Dorothy F. Schmidt
College of Arts and Letters

Link to Course Descriptions for the College of Arts  and Letters

Accreditation: Florida Atlantic University is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

The Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters offers Bachelor of Arts degrees (B.A.) with majors in Anthropology, Art, Communication Studies, English, History, Interdisciplinary Studies, Jewish Studies, Multimedia Studies, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, Theatre, and Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature. The College also offers a Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.), Bachelor of Public Management (B.P.M.) and a Bachelor of Public Safety Administration (B.P.S.A.). The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) may be earned in Art and Theatre. The College also awards the Bachelor of Music (B.M.), and a Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.) is offered in conjunction with the College of Education. University programs leading to teacher certification in art and foreign languages are available to undergraduate students registered in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters. In addition, the College offers several minors available at the undergraduate level.

For graduate students, the College offers a range of Master of Arts (M.A.) degrees with majors in Anthropology, Communication, English, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature as well as an interdisciplinary M.A. degree with major in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. The College also offers Master of Music (M.M.), Master of Nonprofit Management (M.N.M.) and Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) degree programs.

Master of Fine Arts degrees (M.F.A.) may be earned in Studio/Fine Arts, Creative Writing, Media, Technology and Entertainment, and Theatre. (The M.F.A. in Media, Technology and Entertainment is currenlty on suspension and not accepting students.)

A combined degree program - Bachelor of Architecture/Master of Urban and Regional Planning Advanced Standing - is offered jointly by the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters and the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science. For a complete description of this B.Arch./M.U.R.P. Advanced Standing Program, see the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Graduate students may obtain the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) degree in Anthropology. 

A Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) with a Major in Comparative Studies and a Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) with Major in Public Administration are offered by the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters as well.

In addition, the College offers several certificate programs, interdisciplinary in nature, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Each type of program—bachelor's degree programs, master's degree programs, the doctoral program and the certificate programs—is described in the following sections. The course offerings pertaining to each program are listed by department at the end of the College section.


Bachelor's Degree Program Information

General Studies Degree Program
The University offers a Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) degree program that allows students to design a plan of study to meet their personal interests and career goals. The 120-credit program includes 15 credits of upper-division coursework in one discipline, which students select in consultation with an advisor. For more B.G.S. details and degree requirements, please refer to the Degree Programs section of this catalog.

Degree Requirements
To receive a bachelor's degree in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, students must complete the following requirements.

Bachelor of Architecture

  1.  The School of Architecture requires that all prerequisites be met prior to enrolling in the upper-division (3000 level or above) design studio sequence. Failure to fulfill all prerequisites prevents entry into any design studio. Students who have not met prerequisites will be administratively withdrawn from the course at the time the deficiency is determined to exist.
  2. The last 30 upper division credits (5000-level courses) must be earned in residence at FAU.
  3. Students in Architecture should consult their program's student manual/handbook for more detailed information.

Bachelor of Arts

(Freshmen and transfer students with fewer than 30 credits)

  1. All degree requirements of the University. (See Degree Requirements section of this catalog.)
  2. All requirements in the major. Refer to the description of major requirements listed with each undergraduate degree program in this section.
  3. Majors in Art History, History, Music and Philosophy will take 9 credits in Arts and Letters electives.
  4. The University Foreign Language Graduation Requirement.
  5. A cumulative average of "C" or better in all coursework attempted. At least a "C" or better in each course in the major, minor or certificate. All courses in the major must be graded. Pass/Fail is not accepted.
  6. File an Application for Degree form, available at the Office of the Registrar. File with the Office of Student Academic Services.
  7. Certification by the faculty of the College for the awarding of the degree.

Additional Admission Requirements
Any student who does not have a "C" average in freshman English will be required to take further expository writing. Proficiency in a foreign language is strongly recommended for admission to programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Bachelor of Arts

(Transfer students with 30 credits or more)

  1. All degree requirements of the University, with a minimum of 120 credits in academic courses, except Architecture, which requires 159 approved credits (see the Degree Requirements section of this catalog).
  2. All requirements in the major. Refer to the description of major requirements listed with each undergraduate degree program in this section. All coursework transferred from another institution in the major field must be approved in writing by the chair of the major department.
  3. A minimum of 9 credits (12 credits at the upper division in the School of Communication and Multimedia Studies) within the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters but outside the major department, excluding courses used to satisfy the foreign language requirement and any course used to satisfy lower-division General Education requirements in Arts and Letters. The Departments of Anthropology, English, Political Science, Sociology, and Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature do not require Arts and Letters electives. These departments treat this requirement as "free" electives.
  4. A cumulative average of "C" or better in all coursework attempted. At least a "C" or better in each course in the major, minor or certificate. All courses in the major must be graded. Pass/Fail is not accepted.
  5. File an Application for Degree form, available at the Office of the Registrar. File with the Office of Student Academic Services.
  6. Certification by the faculty of the College for the awarding of the degree.


Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education

(Freshmen and transfer students with fewer than 30 credits)

  1. All degree requirements of the University, including the University Foreign Language Requirement (Bachelor of Fine Arts-Art majors only; Bachelor of Fine Arts-Theatre, Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Music Education majors are excluded from this requirement). (See Degree Requirements section of this catalog.)
  2. All requirements in the major. Refer to the description of major requirements listed with each undergraduate degree program in this section.
  3. A cumulative average of "C" or better in all coursework attempted.
  4. The University Foreign Language Graduation Requirement (Bachelor of Fine Arts-Theatre, Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Music Education majors are excluded from this requirement.)
  5. At least a "C" or better in each course in the major, minor or certificate. All courses in the major must be graded. Pass/Fail is not accepted.
  6. File an Application for Degree form, available at the Office of the Registrar. File with the Office of Student Academic Services.
  7. Certification by the faculty of the College for the awarding of the degree.

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education

(Transfer students with 30 credits or more)

  1. All degree requirements of the University, with a minimum of 120 credits in academic courses. (See the Degree Requirements section of this catalog.)
  2. All requirements in the major. Refer to the description of major requirements listed with each undergraduate degree program in this section. All coursework transferred from another institution in the major field must be approved in writing by the chair of the major department.
  3. A cumulative average of "C" or better in all coursework attempted
  4. At least a "C" or better in each course in the major, minor or certificate. All courses in the major must be graded. Pass/Fail is not accepted.
  5. The Foreign Language Entry Requirement.
  6. File an Application for Degree form, available at the Office of the Registrar. File with the Office of Student Academic Services.
  7. Certification by the faculty of the College for the awarding of the degree.

Bachelor of Nonprofit Management and Bachelor of Public Administration

Refer to the admission and degree requirements under the School of Public Administration header.

Second Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts Programs

  1. A minimum of 30 credits must be earned in residence at FAU, in addition to the first degree (a minimum total of 150 credits for concurrent degrees).
  2.  Satisfy the admission requirements of the college granting the second degree.
  3.  Satisfy all College and department degree requirements. Refer to Degree Program Requirements under the major department listed below.
  4. File an Application for Degree form, available at the Office of the Registrar. File with the Office of Student Academic Services.

Master's Degree Program Information

The Master of Arts degree is offered in Anthropology, Communication, English, History, Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature, Political Science, Sociology, and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree is offered in the Department of Anthropology. 

The Master of Fine Arts degree is offered in Fine Arts in the Department of Visual Arts and Art History, in Creative Writing in the Department of English, in Media, Technology and Entertainment in the School of Communication and Multimedia Studies and in Design and Technology and Performance in the Department of Theatre and Dance. (The M.F.A. in Media, Technology and Entertainment is currenlty on suspension and not accepting students.)

The Master of Music degree is offered in the School of the Arts, Department of Music.

The Master of Nonprofit Management and the Master of Public Administration are offered in the School of Public Administration.


M.A., M.A.T., M.F.A., M.M. Admission Requirements

To be admitted to the Master of Arts, the Master of Arts in Teaching, the Master of Fine Arts or the Master of Music degree program, the student must meet the following criteria:

  1.  For Visual Arts and Art History and Political Science:
    1. At least a 3.0 average in the 60 credits prior to receipt of the bachelor’s degree or a graduate degree from an accredited institution.
    2.  For Anthropology, Communication, the English M.A., Sociology, Theatre and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies: At least a 3.0 average in the 60 credits prior to receipt of the bachelor's degree and competitive GRE scores.
    3. For the M.A. in Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature and the M.F.A. in Creative Writing: At least a 3.0 grade point average in the last 60 undergraduate credits.
    4.  For Music: A baccalaureate in music and a satisfactory audition, writing sample or portfolio depending on desired concentration.
    5.  For History: At least a 3.0 average in the 60 credits prior to receipt of the bachelor’s degree, a 155 on the verbal portion and a 4.0 on the analytical writing section of the GRE.
  2. Recommendation for admission by the proposed major department and the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters graduate committee.
  3. An undergraduate degree in the discipline (since departments may vary in requirements, students should discuss their qualifications with the department).
  4.  Master of Fine Arts students must pass an acting audition, pass a directing evaluation or have portfolios evaluated, depending upon their major sequence.

Master's Degree Requirements
To be eligible for the Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Music, Master of Nonprofit Management or Master of Public Administration degree from the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, the student must complete all University requirements for the degree. To be recommended by the department and the graduate committee, the student must meet all departmental requirements.

Graduate students must meet the language requirement set by each department in the College of Arts and Letters for their graduate degree programs.

Doctoral Degree Program Information

The Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters offers Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Comparative Studies and in Public Administration.

Comparative Studies is the application of various approaches within the humanities, arts and social sciences to the study of significant issues. The Ph.D. in Comparative Studies also involves developing expertise in advanced interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary study, including exploration of topics and materials from at least two traditional disciplines (e.g., political science and English literature; anthropology and history; art history, literature and communication).

The Ph.D. in Public Administration offers paths of study in Administrative Theory and Inquiry, Public Policy Studies, Organizational Studies, Public Budgeting and Financial Administration, and Urban and Regional Planning. Also, students are allowed to assemble paths of study of their own devising.

Admission and degree requirements for these Ph.D. programs are listed under the Comparative Studies Department or School of Public Administration headings later in this section.


Interdisciplinary Minors

Environment and society
Undergraduate minor

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in Environment and Society introduces students to the intersecting fields of Environmental and Climate Science, Environmental Humanities (inclusive of Literature and the Visual Arts), Political Science, Sociology, History, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Careers in Environmental Journalism, Environmental Consulting, and Climate Change Mitigation and Postsecondary Education in Environmental Humanities and Environmental Studies require interdisciplinary study across the humanities, geosciences and social sciences. The expanding academic discipline of Environmental Humanities, which recognizes that our environmental dilemmas are fundamentally problems of ethics and political power, demands fluency in this expanding field of study.

Students may earn this minor by completing 12 credits in courses that focus on Environment and Society. Students may choose from the content courses below to meet the 12-credit requirement.

Of the 12 credit hours required for the minor, 9 must be at the upper-division level; at least 75 percent of required credits for the minor must be completed at FAU; and students completing the minor must earn a minimum overall FAU grade point average of 2.0 within the coursework required. Program Coordinator: Dr. Stacey Balkan, Department of English, sbalkan@fau.edu

Required Courses    
Hazards, Climate and People EVR 4112 3
Literature and Environment LIT 4434 3
Elective Courses (choose two from table below, at least one must be upper division)
American Environmental History AMH 3630 3
America and the Sea AMH 4694 3
Exploring Natural Habitats as a Curriculum for Young Learners EEC 4237 3
The Blue Planet ESC 2000 3
Environmental Science and Engineering ENV 3001C 3
Environmental Science and Sustainability EVR 1001 3
Climate Change: The Human Dimensions EVR 1110 3
Environment and Society EVR 2017 3
Climate Change: Myths, Realities and Solutions EVR 3114 3
Comparative Environmental Politics INR 4054 3
Global Environmental Politics and Policies INR 4350 3
Environmental Journalism JOU 4314 3
U.S. Environmental Law and Policy POS 4697 3
Environmental Sociology SYD 3510 3
Sociology of Climate and Disaster SYP 4464 3
Gender and Climate Change WST 2351 3
Green Consciousness WST 4349 3


Film and Video
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 16 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in Film and Video gives students in any major the opportunity to bring together courses from several departments and colleges into a multidisciplinary curriculum emphasizing all aspects of film and video. Participating are faculty from communication and multimedia studies, literature, languages, anthropology, theatre and other disciplines. Students are offered scholarly study of the history, theory and criticism of film, video and television as well as hands-on courses in video production. The minor structures FAU’s current course offerings in film and video to guide undergraduate students through a cohesive study of film and its related disciplines.

This program is open to all degree-seeking students, with the exception of those pursuing the B.A. in Multimedia Studies (Film and Media concentration). Students may enroll with the program director at any time but must be enrolled by the time they apply for graduation. The minor will be awarded upon completion of the bachelor’s degree. A student who already holds a baccalaureate degree may pursue the minor in conjunction with a second bachelor’s degree. All courses taken in the program may be counted toward other general and specific graduation requirements, and courses taken to fulfill other requirements may be applied to the film and video program.

The curriculum consists of four parts: the core course, Film Appreciation, which introduces students to basic critical and technical concepts in film analysis; one course in the history of film and video; one course in theory and/or criticism; and two courses in production and/or contexts. Students must follow the distribution guidelines and complete a minimum of five courses. Each course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to be counted toward the minor. At least 75 percent of all credits for the minor must be earned from FAU. In addition to the regular curriculum, other courses with significant attention to film and video may be approved by the program director.

Core Course (required)

Film Appreciation

FIL 2000

3

History (one course required)

Film to the 1940s

FIL 4036

4

Film since the 1940s

FIL 4037

4

Traditions of Documentary Film

FIL 4364

4

Theory and Criticism (one course required)

Film Theory

FIL 3803

4

Film Criticism

FIL 4851

3

Media Criticism

MMC 4501

3

Production and Contexts (two courses required)

Production

Television Production

RTV 3543C

4

Digital Film Production

RTV 3531

4

Experimental Cinema

RTV 3229

4

Producing and Directing Documentary Film

RTV 3332C

4

Scriptwriting

FIL 4106

4

Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen 1

TPP 4600

3

Contexts

Anthropology of Film

ANT 3391

3

Literature and Film

ENG 4114

3

Women and Film

FIL 4056

3

Radical Film, New Media and Social Movements

FIL 4058

4

RI: Hollywood, Censorship and Regulation

FIL 4672

4

Studies in Asian Cinema

FIL 4843

3-4

Introduction to the Business of Motion Pictures

GEB 3052

3

Italian Cinema: From Text to Screen

ITT 3520

3

Italian-American Cinema

ITT 3522

3

U.S. Telecommunication Industry

RTV 4403

3

Spanish Literature and Film

SPT 4720

3

Sex, Violence and Hollywood

WST 4337

3

 

HEALTH HUMANITIES
UNDERGRADUATE MINOR

(Minimum of 15 credits)

The minor in Health Humanities is open to all undergraduate students at FAU. The minor is awarded upon graduation from an undergraduate program at FAU; it is not awarded independently of an undergraduate degree. For minor details click here.


Museums, Archives and Public History
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 18 credits required)

This 18-credit multidisciplinary minor in Museums, Archives and Public History is designed to train undergraduate students in the increasingly sophisticated and interconnected fields of public history, museum studies, archive and records management, conservation of art and artifacts, historic preservation, material culture, digital humanities and web-based exhibit design, and material culture. The minor equips students with the latest skills to serve in associated jobs in the public and private sectors, including professional opportunities in museums, galleries, historical societies, archaeological sites, libraries, private and corporate collections, and archives. At least 75 percent of the18 credits required for the minor must be completed at FAU. Students completing the minor must have a minimum overall FAU grade point average of 2.0 within the coursework required.

Core Courses (9 credits)

Required

Introduction to Public History

HIS 3065

3

Two of the following:

Museum Studies and Gallery Practices

ARH 4794

3

Introduction to Archives

HIS 3080

3

Historic Preservation

HIS 3086

3

Elective Courses* (9 credits)

American Material Culture to 1860

AMH 4302

3

American Material Culture from 1860

AMH 4303

3

Real Archaeology

ANT 3190

3

Native-American Culture and Society

ANT 3312

3

Florida Archaeology

ANT 4158

3

Internship in Anthropology

ANT 4940

1-3

History of Ceramics

ARH 4013

3

Medieval Art and Archaeology

ARH 4200

3

Renaissance Art and Architecture

ARH 4305

3

Baroque Art and Architecture

ARH 4350

3

18th- and 19th-Century Art

ARH 4371

3

Modern Art: 1863-1945

ARH 4450

3

Contemporary Art

ARH 4470

3

American Painting and Sculpture

ARH 4610

3

History of Photography

ARH 4710

3

Art History Internship

ARH 4940

1-4

Introduction to Archives

HIS 3080

3

Historic Preservation

HIS 3086

3

Internship in Public History

HIS 4944

1-3

Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector

PAD 4144

3

Funding for Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 4202

3

Financial Management of Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 4203

3

* Additional courses that fulfill the elective requirements may be added in the future.

Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The Peace, Justice and Human Rights (PJHR) minor is designed to provide an enriching educational experience for degree-seeking students interested in themes of peace, social justice and human rights. For details about the minor, see the Peace, Justice and Human Rights minor and certificate entry below.

Sport Studies
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in Sport Studies gives students in any major the opportunity to bring together courses from across Arts and Letters to explore various aspects of sports and society that will help strengthen their ability to see sports not just as a game, but as a significant aspect of modern society.

This minor is open to all degree-seeking students and will be awarded upon completion of a bachelor’s degree. A student who already holds a baccalaureate degree may pursue the minor in conjunction with a second bachelor’s degree. All courses taken in the program may be counted toward other general and specific graduation requirements, and courses taken to fulfill other requirements may be applied to this minor.

Requirements for the minor include completion of four courses (12 credits) with a minimum grade of "C" and a 2.5 GPA. At least 75 percent of all credits for the minor must be earned from FAU. In addition to the regular curriculum, other courses with significant attention to sport studies may be approved by the program director.

Required Courses (select four courses, 12 credits)

American Sports History

AMH 4611

3

Sports Journalism

JOU 3313

3

Management Principles in Exercise Science and Health Promotion

PET 4404

3

Sports Communication

PUR 3463

3

The Sociology of Sport

SYP 3650

3

Gender and Sport

WST 4614

3

Sport-related courses as approved by coordinator

3

Sport-related internship in major area

3


Certificate Programs

Arts and Performance Entrepreneurship
Asian Studies
Caribbean and Latin American Studies
Classical Studies
English as a Second Language (ESL) Studies
Ethics, Law and Society
Ethnic Studies
Film and Culture
Literary Translation
Nonproft Executive Leadership
Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Professional and Technical Writing
Public Ethics and Leadership
Public Policy
Religious Studies
Sexuality and Gender Education
Undergraduate Research
Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

The Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters offers certificates of study in interdisciplinary fields at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Courses taken for a certificate program may be used to fulfill other general and specific degree requirements, just as courses taken to fulfill other requirements may be applied to the certificate curriculum. Certificates are awarded upon completion of the certificate requirements. The certificates are described below. For more information, please visit www.fau.edu/artsandletters/certificate-programs.php.

Arts and performance entrepreneurship
Undergraduate Minor or Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The Undergraduate Arts and Performance Entrepreneurship minor or certificate provides artists, writers and performers the entrepreneurial skills needed to forge their freelance careers. This program is meant for anyone whose career trajectory is likely to follow the freelance model. Students may earn this minor or certificate by completing 12 credits: two required entrepreneurship courses (6 credits) and two additional electives in their area of concentration (6 credits).

Required    
Entrepreneurship ENT 4024 3
Arts and Performance Entrepreneurship 1 MUM 3052 3
Two of the following courses    
Museum Studies and Gallery Practices ARH 4794 3
Building a Web Portfolio ART 4632C 3
Literary Publishing and Editing CRW 4723 3
Writing for Nonprofits ENC 4354 3
Introduction to the Music Business MUM 3301 3
Legal Issues for the Musician MUM 3303 3
Arts and Performance Entrepreneurship 2 MUM 4053 3
Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector PAD 4144 3
Funding for Nonprofit Organizations PAD 4202 3
Financial Management of Nonprofit Organizations PAD 4203 3
Audition and Career Forum TPP 4224 3


Description/ Information
The minor is available to all undergraduate degree-seeking students and may be earned upon successful completion of the coursework above and the simultaneous completion of a bachelor's degree at FAU.

The certificate is available to degree-seeking students, non-degree students, and working professionals. Students pursuing the certificate may apply for it in the College of Arts and Letters Office of Student Academic Services upon successful completion of the coursework.

Students cannot obtain both a certificate and a minor. Each program requires 12 credits, with minimum grades of "C" required in all courses for the minor and certificate. For the minor, at least 9 of the 12 credits must be earned at FAU.

Timely Graduation
M!nors and certificates should be considered an optional direction for elective credits. Students may not add a minor or certificate without permission from an Arts and Letters advisor (and main college advisor if different). Students are generally not permitted to add a minor/certificate after earning 90 credits or if completing it will result in an Excess Hour Surcharge.


Asian Studies
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The certificate in Asian Studies introduces undergraduate students to continuity and change in the Asian world, encompassing East Asia, the Middle East and South Asia. A variety of careers in this era of globalization necessitate knowledge of international affairs. Students in the Asian Studies certificate will benefit from being exposed to diverse approaches to the study of Asia.

Students may earn this certificate by completing 15 credits in courses that focus on Asia. No more than 9 of these credits may be earned in a single discipline. Students may choose from the content courses below to meet the 15-credit requirement.

Cultures of South Asia

ANT 3361

3

Islamic History

ASH 3222

3

The Modern Middle East

ASH 3223

3

The Ottoman Empire

ASH 3233

3

History of East Asia

ASH 3300

3

Women in Asian History

ASH 3384

3

The Crusades

ASH 4210

3

History of Modern China

ASH 4404

3

History of Modern Japan

ASH 4442

3

History of Modern India

ASH 4550

3

Indian Civilization

ASH 4560

3

History of Eastern Ideas

ASH 4600

3

Comparative Politics: Middle East

CPO 4403

3

Beginning Hebrew Language and Culture 1

HBR 1120

4

Beginning Hebrew Language and Culture 2

HBR 1121

4

Intermediate Hebrew Language and Culture 1

HBR 2220

4

Beginning Japanese Language and Culture 1

JPN 1120

4

Beginning Japanese Language and Culture 2

JPN 1121

4


Caribbean and Latin American Studies
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The certificate in Caribbean and Latin American Studies is awarded to undergraduate students completing multidisciplinary studies of Latin America and the Caribbean in conjunction with an academic major, usually in one of the departments represented in the curriculum. It is approximately the equivalent of an interdisciplinary minor. The certificate program seeks to provide the student with both an overview of the region's heritage as well as an opportunity to pursue upper-division study in several disciplines focused on current affairs. The successful completion of the program will prepare the student for a wide range of job opportunities and graduate programs in and dealing with Latin America and the Caribbean.

The curriculum consists of three parts:

  1. A required overview course, Introduction to Latin American Studies, LAS 2000 (3 credits);
  2. Four additional courses from the list of core courses below. No more than two can be taken from any one department (12 credits);
  3. Students must demonstrate an intermediate level of proficiency in a languageof the region other than English. This can be achieved by one of two means: passing the CLEP test through the 2220 level, or a passing grade in a 2220-level language course. Heritage or "native" learners of one of the region's languages should discuss their language skills with a certificate advisor in order to determine if they should CLEP or take a special language course for heritage learners.

Students are advised to enroll first in LAS 2000 and then continue their studies in any order. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in each course applicable to the certificate. These courses may be counted toward other general and specific graduation requirements. No more than two core courses may be in the student's major. Students who already hold a baccalaureate degree may pursue the certificate as a non-degree-seeking student or in conjunction with a second bachelor's degree. Students are encouraged to study in a country of the region through FAU Study Abroad Programs.

Core Courses
This is not an exhaustive list. Students may take any course with content focused on the region. The following are examples:

The Maya and Their Neighbors

ANT 3163

3

South America Before Columbus

ANT 3165

3

Latin American Politics

CPO 4303

3

Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean

GEA 4405

3

Colonial Latin American History

LAH 3100

3

Latin American Independence

LAH 3133

3

Modern Latin American History

LAH 3200

3

History of Mexico

LAH 4430

3

History of the Caribbean

LAH 4470

3

History of Cuba

LAH 4480

3

Special Topics in Latin American History

LAH 4930

3

Caribbean Literatures in English

LIT 4192

3

Latin American Culture and Civilization*

SPN 3501

3

Latin American Literature in Translation

SPT 4130

3

Introduction to Hispanic Literature*

SPW 3030

3

Special Topics*

SPW 4930

1-3

* Courses taught in Spanish and may require prerequisites.


Classical Studies
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 18 credits required)

The certificate in Classical Studies, available to undergraduate students, is a multidisciplinary program in the ancient Greek and Roman foundations of Western culture. Program offerings include courses in history, philosophy, literature, languages, social and political theory, the arts, archaeology and rhetoric. In addition to courses that pertain directly to Greco-Roman antiquity, the curriculum includes select courses that treat the reception and influence of classical culture in later historical contexts, including contemporary popular culture. The program will be especially valuable to students pursuing careers in law, medicine, the ministry, education or public service.

The Classical Studies Program welcomes students from any of FAU's colleges and those who have earned degrees elsewhere. Along with the certificate curriculum, the program also sponsors lectures by visiting scholars and other special events.

Complete one of the options below to earn the certificate:

Option 1 (six courses): Six lecture courses, at least three of which must be from the core list.

Option 2 (six courses): Two semesters of either Classical Greek or Latin and four lecture courses, at least two of which must be from the core list.

Option 3 (six courses): Two semesters of Classical Greek, two semesters of Latin and two courses from the core list.

Lecture Courses

Core Courses

Backgrounds for Literature

ENL 3425

History of Greek Civilization

EUH 4403

History of Roman Civilization

EUH 4411

Special Topics*

FOL 4933

Ancient Philosophy

PHH 3100

Elective Courses

Topics - Art History*

ARH 4930

Special Topics*

LIT 4930

Special Topics*

POT 4932

Classical Rhetoric

SPC 3233

Reception Courses

Medieval Literature

ENL 4210

Special Topics*

FRW 4930

History of Christianity to 1500

HIS 3432

Dante: The Commedia in Translation

ITT 4440

Seminar: Special Topics*

LIT 6934

Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

PHH 3280

Language Courses**

Beginning Classical Greek Language and Culture 1

GRE 1120

Beginning Classical Greek Language and Culture 2

GRE 1121

Beginning Latin 1

LAT 1120

Beginning Latin 2

LAT 1121

* Check website link below for specific course title each term.

** Language courses may be used to satisfy the University Foreign Language Graduation requirement.


English as a Second Language (ESL) Studies
Undergraduate and Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The certificate in English as a Second Language (ESL) Studies is open to all undergraduate, graduate and nondegree students at FAU. The ESL Studies certificate aims to prepare those who wish to teach ESL in a variety of settings, in the United States or abroad.

ESL certificate courses taken to fulfill other degree requirements at FAU may be applied toward the certificate. For more information, visit this website.

 

Required Courses (15 credits)

ESL Certificate Undergraduate Program

ESL Certificate Graduate Program

Introduction to Linguistics

LIN 3010

Principles of Linguistic Analysis

LIN 6135

Applied Linguistics and TESOL

TSL 4251

Applied Linguistics and TESOL

TSL 4251

(choose any three of the following)

(choose any three of the following)

Structure of Modern English

LIN 4680

Structure of Modern English

LIN 4680

Sociolinguistics

LIN 4600

Sociolinguistics

LIN 6601

Bilingualism

LIN 4620

Bilingualism

LIN 6622

Special Topics

LIN 4930

Second Language Acquisition

LIN 6720

Introduction to TESOL

TSL 4080

Research in Foreign Language Learning Theories

FLE 6892

 

 

Intercultural Communication

SPC 6715

All courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better and with an overall average of "B."

All courses must be completed with a grade of "B" or better.

Ethics, Law and Society
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The Ethics, Law and Society certificate program for undergraduate students encourages the study of normative and value issues in the humanities, social sciences and the arts. Ethical competence is becoming increasingly important in professional life. This certificate program is aimed at preprofessionals in law, health care and business as well as disciplinary majors. It may be advantageous for students who plan professional careers to be able to demonstrate formal training or interest in ethics. That aside, students are well served by examining the complex relationship between the normative enterprises of law, morality and politics.

Students are required to take five (3-credit) upper-division courses, earning a grade of "B" or better in each course, for a total of 15 credits with the following distribution.

General Ethics (one course) 

Ethical Theory

PHI 4661

Moral Problems

PHI 3638

Philosophy (one course)

Philosophy of Law

PHM 3400

Social and Political Theory

PHM 3200

Philosophy of Sexuality

PHM 3020

Feminist Philosophy

PHM 3123

Biomedical Ethics or RI: Biomedical Ethics

PHI 4633

Environmental Ethics

PHI 3640

Ancient Philosophy

PHH 3100

Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

PHH 3280

Late Modern Philosophy

PHH 4440

Political Science (two courses)

Law and American Society

POS 3691

Constitutional Law: Government Powers and Limits

POS 4603

Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties

POS 4604

The Judicial Process

POS 4609

U.S. Environmental Law and Policy

POS 4697

Ancient Political Thought

POT 4013

Modern Political Thought

POT 4054

International Law: Foundations and Institutions

INR 3403

International Law of Peace and Diplomacy

INR 3413

International Law of Armed Conflict

INR 3433

War and Peace

INR 4006

The Politics of Human Rights

INR 4075

Course in a third discipline (one course)

History of American Immigration and Ethnicity

AMH 3530

Law in U.S. History

AMH 4558

The Civil Rights Movement

AMH 4575

Ethics and Architecture

ARC 4202

Conservation Biology

BSC 3052

Any Business Law course

BUL

Ethics and the Justice System

CCJ 4054

Issues in Criminal Law

CCJ 4931

Criminal Law and the Constitution

CJL 4064

Judicial Administration and the Criminal Courts

CJL 4510

News Media Ethics

COM 4621

Principles of Hospitality Law

HFT 3603

History of Human Rights

HIS 3204

The Holocaust

JST 4701

Mass Communication Law and Regulation

MMC 4200

Ethics in Nursing

NUR 4826

Administrative Process and Ethics

PAD 4604

Contemporary Social Theory

SYA 3120

Social Control and Deviance

SYP 3570

Gender and Society

SYD 3800

Class Status and Power

SYO 3530

Intersectional Feminist Politics in the U.S.

WST 4404

Gender-Based Violence and Social Movements

WST 3325


Ethnic Studies
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The Ethnic Studies certificate program is open to all degree-seeking undergraduate students and is designed to be taken concurrently with the student's major. Students who already hold a baccalaureate degree may pursue the certificate as a non-degree-seeking student or in conjunction with a second bachelor's degree. The program is especially appealing because courses may be counted toward other general and specific graduation requirements in the student's major. Likewise, courses taken to fulfill other requirements can be applied to the Ethnic Studies Program.

Certificate Requirements
A student must earn a minimum of 15 credits in Ethnic Studies courses with a grade of "C" or better in each course in order to receive the certificate. Once satisfactorily completed, the certificate will be awarded and the student will receive a transcript notation designating completion of the program. Each student participating in the program must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Satisfactory completion of one of the Core Courses. See eligible Core Courses below.
  2. Satisfactory completion of four Distribution Courses in at least three disciplines/departments. See eligible courses divided by discipline/department below.

Curriculum
The curriculum of the Ethnic Studies certificate program offers students the outstanding benefits of an interdisciplinary education. Students have the option of choosing from a menu of courses that covers various aspects of ethnicity or various ethnicities. The curriculum is grounded in core courses devoted to the critical study of the main concepts and methodologies related to ethnicity. Besides focusing on these concepts, the courses examine different theories of ethnicity and race as well as other issues about the creation and legitimization of ethnicity emerging from its social and historical construction. Consistent with the viewpoint of the program, the core courses are taught from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Core Courses
(select one of the following)

History of American Immigration
and Ethnicity

AMH 3530

3

Race and Ethnic Relations

SYD 3700

3

Minorities and the Media

MMC 3601

3

American Multicultural Discourse

SPC 3704

3

Intercultural Communication

SPC 3710

3

Gender, Race and Communication

SPC 4712

3

Ethnicity and Communication

SPC 4718

3

Distribution Courses
(select four of the following from at least three
disciplines/departments)

Anthropology

African-American Anthropology

ANT 4315

3

Cultures of South Asia

ANT 3361

3

Cultural Anthropology

ANT 4414

3

Gender and Culture

ANT 4302

3

Native-American Culture and Society

ANT 3312

3

Communication

Storytelling in Popular Culture

COM 4703

3

Curriculum and Instruction

Education in a Multicultural Society

EDF 3610

3

Introduction to Diversity for Educators

EDF 2085

3

English

African-American Literature to 1895

AML 4604

3

African-American Literature 1895-Present

AML 4607

3

American-Indian Literature

AML 4640

3

Asian-American Literatures

AML 4673

3

Caribbean Literatures in English

LIT 4192

3

Jewish-American Literature

AML 4663

3

U.S. Latino/a Literatures

AML 4630

3

History

African-American History to 1877

AMH 3571

3

African-American History since 1877

AMH 3572

3

The Civil Rights Movement

AMH 4575

3

History of the Caribbean

LAH 4470

3

Islamic History

ASH 3222

3

Slavery and Abolition in the Americas

HIS 4451

3

Women in Asian History

ASH 3384

3

Jewish Studies

American-Jewish History, 1492-1990

JST 4415

3

The Holocaust

JST 4701

3

Classical Jewish Civilization

JST 3403

3

Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature

Introduction to Latin American Studies

LAS 2000

3

Italian-American Cinema

ITT 3522

3

Music

Ethnomusicology

MUH 3514

3

Jazz in American Society

MUH 3801

3

Philosophy

Africana Philosophy

PHP 3781

3

Political Science

Comparative Politics: Middle East

CPO 4403

3

The Comparative Politics of Ethnic Conflict

CPO 4724

3

Religions and World Politics

CPO 3761

3

Sociology

Self and Society

SYP 3110

3

Social Change

SYP 3400

3

Women's Studies

Intersectional Feminist Politics in the U.S.

WST 4404

3


Film and Culture
Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

This certificate program is available for master's and doctoral students. It provides a flexible curricular framework for an interdisciplinary focus on film and culture. The program is ideal for preparing graduate students in any department or college to write a thesis or dissertation in the area of film and culture studies or simply to demonstrate coherent knowledge for teaching or other purposes.

Admission to the Film and Culture Graduate Certificate is limited to students currently enrolled in a graduate program at Florida Atlantic University. Credits earned for graduate degree programs will also count for the certificate if approved by advisors in both programs. Requirements include the two core courses below and two graduate-level elective courses. Applications for the certificate should be submitted to the certificate director upon successful completion of the required courses with a minimum grade of "B" in each.

Required Core Courses

Film Theory and Criticism

FIL 6807

3

Film History and Historiography

FIL 6026

3

Recommended Electives (select two courses)*

Mass Media Theory

MMC 6408

3

Sex, Violence and Hollywood

WST 6339

3

Italian Culture through Film

ITT 6524

3

The Business of Motion Pictures

GEB 6055

3

Contemporary Motion Picture Business Management

GEB 6056

3

Special Topics in Spanish-American Literature

SPW 6939

3

* Substitutions may be made with the approval of the certificate director.


Literary Translation
Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The graduate certificate in Literary Translation, offered jointly by the English Department and the Department of Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature, offers students an opportunity to study and practice literary translation in more depth during the course of their studies. Literary translation is an increasingly in-demand vocation in the rapidly globalizing world. This certificate gives students tangible training in the field and acknowledgment of that training. Through directed coursework in the history and practice of translation, as well as through a capstone translation project, students gain knowledge and competency beyond that of their cohort who simply take a class or two in the field. Students typically work from Spanish, French, Italian, German or Hebrew into English or the reverse. However, students are welcome to work in a wide variety of other languages. The is not a certificate in simultaneous interpretation, technical translation or any other type of non-literary translation.

Certificate Requirements

Coursework
(15 credits, no more than one of the required courses may be transferred from another institution, to be approved on a case-by-case basis).

Required - Translation workshop
(must be taken twice)

Translation Workshop

CRW 6024

3

Required

History and Theory of Translation

FOT 6807

3

Required - Two of the following courses

Foundations of Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature

FOL 6731C

3

Topics in Translation Studies

FOT 6930C

3

History of the English Language

LIN 6107

3


Capstone Project (LIT 6914) 0-3 credits
The final translation project usually is a continuation/expansion of a translation project on which the student has begun work during one of the translation workshops. The parameters of the project (page count, paratextual material, etc.) are decided upon by the student and the advisor. These projects are longer than a seminar paper but shorter than a thesis: 15-20 poems or 25-30 pages of prose. The project is supervised by a primary advisor and a secondary advisor who is an expert in the project's source language. (Students most typically translate into their native language.) The student should consult the director of the certificate program for guidance in selecting advisors.

Nonprofit Executive Leadership
Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

This 12-credit graduate certificate program is available to students who have completed an undergraduate degree. Students may enroll in this certificate program while pursuing a degree in another discipline at FAU or independent of other graduate work.

For admission to this certificate program, students should have a B average (3.0) at the graduate level or an overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0. Students not matriculating at FAU should complete a non-degree seeking student application through the Registrar's Office. Credits earned for graduate degree programs will also count for the certificate, if approved by advisors in both programs. Applications for the certificate should be submitted to the graduate (master's) programs coordinator in the School of Public Administration upon successful completion of the required courses with a minimum grade of "B" in each.

Requirements include the successful completion of four courses: two core courses and two electives chosen from the list below.

Required Core Courses

Introduction to Nonprofit Management

PAD 6142

3

Public Policy and Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 6143

3

Recommended Electives (select two courses)*

Public Leadership

PAD 6063

3

Organization and Administrative Behavior

PAD 6106

3

Volunteer Management in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 6145

3

Governance in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 6149

3

Legal and Ethical Issues in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 6165

3

Human Resource Management for Nonprofits

PAD 6166

3

Management in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 6168

3

Fundraising for Nonprofits

PAD 6206

3

Grant Writing and Project Management

PAD 6233

3

Financial Management for Nonprofit Managers

PAD 6260

3

* Substitutions may be made with the approval of the graduate programs coordinator.


Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Undergraduate Minor
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The Peace, Justice and Human Rights (PJHR) minor and certificate are designed to provide an enriching educational experience for students interested in themes of peace, social justice and human rights. The minor and certificate have a tailored curriculum that allows students flexibility to design a program matching their personal interests and their academic and professional objectives. Graduates enter fields such as law, international relations, social and community work and education. The minor is available for degree-seeking students and the certificate is for non-degree-seeking students.

Requirements for the Certificate:
Students who are non-degree-seeking may complete the PJHR certificate, which has the same requirements and offers the same tailored curriculum as the minor as noted below.

Requirements for the Minor:

  1. 12 credits of coursework in the area of the minor.
  2. 9 of the 12 credits must be upper-level credits.
  3. At least 75 percent of all required credits must be completed at FAU.
  4. Students completing the minor must have a minimum overall FAU GPA of 2.0 within the coursework required.

Students are required to complete 12 credits from the two categories of classes listed below. No more than 6 credits may be taken from any one department.

Core Courses (6 credits required)

Anthropology of Peace and Violence

ANT 4409

3

History of Human Rights

HIS 3204

3

Introduction to Peace Studies

PAX 3001

3

Rhetoric of Social Protest

SPC 4633

3

Special Topics (Human Rights)

SYA 4930

3

Elective Courses (6 credits required)

Human and Cultural Rights

ANT 4006

3

Ethics in Business

BUL 4443

3

Organized Crime and the Business of Drugs

CCJ 4642

3

Human Trafficking: A Global Justice Issue

CCJ 4694

3

International Criminal Justice Systems

CJE 4174

3

Global Development and Inequality of Nations

CPO 4033

3

The Comparative Politics of Ethnic Conflict

CPO 4724

3

Introduction to Diversity for Educators

EDF 2085

3

The Educated Citizen in a Global Context

EDF 2854

3

Equity Issues in Multicultural Education

EDF 3203

3

Educators in a Multicultural Society

EDF 3610

3

History of European Sexuality

EUH 4684

3

Radical Film, New Media and Social Movements

FIL 4058

3

International Law: Foundations and Institutions

INR 3403

3

International Organization

INR 3502

3

The Politics of Human Rights

INR 4075

3

Global Environmental Politics and Policies

INR 4350

3

Advanced Diplomacy

INR 4503

3

Literature of War

LIT 4605

3

International Communication

MMC 4301

3

Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector

PAD 4144

3

Diversity and Social Vulnerability in Public Safety Administration

PAD 4894

3

Special Topics

PAX 4930

3

Honors Ethics of Social Diversity

PHI 2642

3

Honors Biomedical Ethics

PHI 3633

3

Environmental Ethics

PHI 3640

3

Honors Ethics in Business, Government and Society

PHI 3653

3

Ethical Theory

PHI 4661

3

Philosophy of Law

PHM 3400

3

Honors Punishment

POS 2692

3

Family Violence

SOW 4141

3

Issues in Counseling Women

SOW 4357

3

Intercultural Communication

SPC 3710

3

Capstone in Communication and Civic Life

SPC 4271

3

Special Topics (Law)

SYA 4930

3

Globalization and Social Movements

SYP 3454

3

Globalization and Inequality 

SYP 4453

3

Gender and Climate Change

WST 2351

3

Gender-Based Violence and Social Movements

WST 3325

3

Green Consciousness

WST 4349

3


Professional and Technical Writing
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

Undergraduate students at FAU who wish to enhance their skills and experience in the field of professional writing should pursue the Professional and Technical Writing certificate (PTWC). This certificate offers an interdisciplinary approach to writing instruction and experience, with courses drawing from departments across the University, including English, Communications, Marketing, Management Information Systems, Business and Public Administration. Elective courses are designed to complement students' requirements within their majors, as well as provide students interested in writing and communication with additional, well-rounded training that they will need to succeed in today's digital workplace.

PTWC requirements include a final portfolio that demonstrates students' writing abilities, a required course in professional writing and an internship that includes real-world training in writing.

The certificate is awarded to students who complete 15 credits from the list of approved courses below and the portfolio requirement. The student will receive a transcript notation designating completion of the program. For more information, please visit the PTWC webpage or contact the certificate director.

Required Courses (6 credits)

Professional Writing

ENC 3213

3

OR

Communicating Business Information

GEB 3213

3

AND

English Internship

ENG 4940

3

OR

Outside internship approved by CPTW director

 

3

Elective Courses (9 credits, select three from list below)

Creative Writing

CRW 3010

3

Writing for the Technical Professions

ENC 2248

3

Advanced Exposition

ENC 3310

3

Principles of Research Writing

ENC 4138

3

Writing for Nonprofits

ENC 4354

3

Studies in Writing and Rhetoric

ENG 4020

3

Public and Community Relations

PUR 4411

3

Social Media and Web Technologies

ISM 4054

3

Creative Advertising Strategy: Concepts and Design

MAR 4334

3

Communication Skills for Public Managers

PAD 3438

3

Funding for Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 4202

3

Public Speaking

SPC 2608

3

One special topics class focused on professional communication or writing from any department, approved by the CPTW director

3

Portfolio Requirement

Students must submit a final portfolio, including a résumé, a formal report, a job letter or other example of professional correspondence and one other professional writing sample. For more details on portfolio requirements and assessment, contact the PTWC Director, Julia Mason, at jmason32@fau.edu.


Public Ethics and Leadership
Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

This 12-credit graduate certificate program is available to students who have completed an undergraduate degree. Students may enroll in this certificate program while pursuing a graduate degree at FAU or independent of other graduate work.

For admission to this certificate program, students should have a B average (3.0) at the graduate level or an overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0. Students not matriculating at FAU should complete a non-degree seeking student application through the FAU Registrar’s Office. Credits earned for graduate degree programs also count for the certificate, if approved by advisors in both programs. Applications for the certificate should be submitted to the graduate (master's) program coordinator in the School of Public Administration upon successful completion of the required courses with a minimum grade of "B" in each.

Requirements include the successful completion of four course: two core courses and two elective courses chosen from the list below.

Required Core Courses (6 credits)

Public Leadership

PAD 6063

3

Ethical and Legal Foundations in the Public Sector

PAD 6436

3

Elective Course Options (6 credits, select two courses)*

Public Administration and Public Policy

PAD 6036

3

Organization and Administrative Behavior

PAD 6106

3

Legal and Ethical Issues in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 6165

3

Human Resource Management for Nonprofits

PAD 6166

3

Public Budgeting and Finance

PAD 6227

3

Financial Management for Nonprofit Managers

PAD 6260

3

Strategic Planning in the Public Sector

PAD 6333

3

Human Resource Management in the Public Sector

PAD 6417

3

Special Topics

PAD 6931

3

* Substitutions may be made with the approval of the graduate (master's) programs coordinator.

Public Policy
Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

This certificate program is available to master's and doctoral students. It provides a flexible curricular framework for a focus on public policy. The program is ideal for preparing graduate students in any department or college to demonstrate knowledge for future service in public policy implementation or analysis, or other purposes such as teaching.

Admission to the Public Policy Certificate program is limited to students currently enrolled in a graduate program at Florida Atlantic University. Credits earned for graduate degree programs will also count for the certificate, if approved by the advisors in both programs. Requirements include the successful completion of four courses (12 credits) with a minimum grade of "B" in each, chosen from the list below. Applications for the certificate program should be submitted to the graduate (master's) programs coordinator in the School of Public Administration upon successful completion of the required courses.

Select four courses*

Seminar in Administrative Policy Making

PAD 6035

3

Public Administration and Public Policy

PAD 6036

3

Public Policy and Nonprofit Organizations**

PAD 6143

3

Public Finance and Policy Analysis

PAD 6205

3

Program Review and Analysis**

PAD 6327

3

Seminar in Policy Implementation

PAD 6365

3

Public Policy Process

PAD 6385

3

Regulation***

PAD 6612

3

Special Topics (TBD)

PAD 6931

3

* Substitutions may be made with the approval of the graduate (master's) programs coordinator.
** Has prerequisite.
*** Has policy course prerequisite.


Religious Studies
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The certificate in Religious Studies promotes the academic study of religion. Any degree-seeking undergraduate student in good standing may enroll. Recognizing the significance of religion within human culture, the program advocates constructive, critical analysis of religion, seeking to be as open-minded and pluralistic as possible. It does not sanction any specific religion, but strives to treat religion as similar to other social, political and cultural phenomena representative of the universal panorama of human culture. Because the program is interdisciplinary in orientation and scope, participating students are encouraged to take courses from several departments.

The certificate is awarded to students who complete 15 credits from a list of approved classes with a grade of "C" or higher. No more than two courses may be in the student's major. Two of these must be core courses, one course that focuses on methods for studying religion and one that focuses on the content of religion. The other courses may be selected from a list of approved electives that devote at least half of their content to religion.

The following classes meet the stated criteria:

Core Courses (two courses required)

Methods Courses (one course required)

Anthropology of Religion

ANT 3241

3

Old Testament

REL 3213

3

Philosophy of Religion

PHI 4700

3

Content Courses (one course required)

History of Christianity to 1500

HIS 3432

3

History of Christianity since 1500

HIS 3434

3

History of Eastern Ideas

ASH 4600

3

History of Hasidism

JST 4464

3

Islamic History

ASH 3222

3

Reformation Europe

EUH 4144

3

Religion in America

AMH 4620

3

Elective Courses (choose three from any of the above courses or from the list below)

History of East Asia

ASH 3300

3

The Holocaust

JST 4701

3

Jewish Wisdom

JST 3513

3

The Modern Middle East

ASH 3223

3

Religions and World Politics

CPO 3761

3


Undergraduate Research
Undergraduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

To recognize undergraduate students' excellence in undergraduate research, the Office of Undergraduate Research and Inquiry (OURI) has established the Undergraduate Research Certificate. Requirements for the Research Certificate include completion of 12 credits of research exposure, skill-building and intensive courses as well as dissemination of the outcomes of students' research and inquiry through a research presentation or exhibition.


Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

The Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies offers a variety of opportunities for students:

  1. Undergraduate Minor in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
  2. Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Concentration
    This concentration is available as part of the B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies.
  3. Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Certificate
    This option is available to students who have completed an undergraduate degree and either want a graduate certificate while working toward an M.A. in another area, or want a graduate certificate independent of other graduate work. Successful students will complete four graduate courses for 12 credits. (Listed below.)
  4. Sexuality and Gender Education Certificate
    This is a collaborative certificate program between the Sandler School of Social Work and the Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Details below. 
  5. Master of Arts in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
    This option is a core of the Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and is explained in greater detail under department descriptions found here.
  6. Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies courses available as electives
    This option is open to students throughout the University.

Each of the options above employs an interdisciplinary approach to gender-related issues. Students receive credit for specific courses in a variety of fields, including anthropology, criminal justice, communication, English, history, languages and linguistics, literature, nursing, political science, sociology, and of course, women's studies. The underlying goal of the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program is to understand the broad range of experiences that reflect class, race, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation and age and the interconnections that shape these experiences. The Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program prepares students to think critically about the political, social, economic and historical forces that shape women's and men's lives, along with responses through activism and advocacy.

Undergraduate students whose programs allow electives are encouraged to enroll in the center's course, Introduction to Women's Studies. Program faculty includes professors from many departments who stress student participation in colloquia, conferences, workshops and other engagements across disciplines.

For more information, contact the Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at 561-297-3865 or email wsc@fau.edu.

Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The graduate certificate in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies is available to students who have completed an undergraduate degree. There are two options available for students interested in the graduate certificate.

  1. Students may enroll in the certificate program while pursuing a degree in another discipline.
  2. Students may enroll in the certificate program independent of other graduate work.
  3.  Students will complete 12 credits of graduate courses, 3 credits of which should be taken from one of the Women's Studies core graduate courses.
  4. At least 6 credits should be earned outside of a student's major for those students working toward a graduate degree.
  5. Students may choose courses from a wide selection offered by departments throughout FAU.
  6. Students must receive a grade of "B" or better.
  7.  Approval of courses from the Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies should be obtained prior to enrolling.

Sexuality and Gender Education
Graduate Certificate

(Minimum of 12 credits required) 

This collaborative certificate program between the Sandler School of Social Work and the Center for Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is available for master's and doctoral students. It provides a flexible curricular framework for a focus on Sexuality and Gender Studies within social work and related professions.

From a context that emphasizes the values of diversity, equity, inclusion and social justice, the Graduate Certificate in Sexuality and Gender Education (SAGE) is designed to prepare graduate students to acquire, integrate and apply knowledge of issues related to sex, sexuality and gender. For students pursuing clinical careers, the certificate is designed to provide credits toward certification as a sex therapist based on Florida Department of Health’s current requirements as well as toward certification as a sex educator, counselor or therapist with the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors, and Therapists (AASECT). For students
pursuing other careers, the certificate offers the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of issues connected to service, facilitation, leadership and advocacy with vulnerable populations, especially marginalization related to sex, sexuality and gender.

Admission to the this certificate program is limited to students currently enrolled in any graduate program at Florida Atlantic University. Credits earned for graduate degree programs also count for the certificate if approved by advisors in both programs. Requirements include the two core courses below and two graduate-level elective courses, one from each program (SOW and WST). Applications for the Graduate Certificate should be submitted to the Director of the Center for Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies upon successful completion of the required courses with a minimum grade of "B" in each. Advising for the SAGE Graduate Certificate is shared between the Director of Graduate Studies in the Center and the SAGE Coordinator at
the School of Social Work.

Required Core Courses    
Social Work and Human Sexuality SOW 6153 3
Sexuality and Gender Studies WST 6604 3
Recommended Electives (choose two courses, one from each area)
Conflict Resolution SOW 6158 3
Ethical Issues in Contemporary Social Work Practice SOW 6296 3
Social Work Practice with Survivors of Human Trafficking SOW 6786 3
Special Topics (if applicable) SOW 6930 3
Gender, Sexuality, Myth and Reality WST 6306 3
Gender-Based Violence and Social Movements WST 6327 3
Intersectional Feminist Politics in the U.S. WST 6405 3
Feminist Theory and Praxis WST 6564 3
Gender, Health and Power WST 6615 3
Special Topics in Women's Studies WST 6934 3
Feminization of Poverty WST 6938 3



Departments in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters

The College includes the schools/departments/programs of Anthropology, Architecture, Communication and Multimedia Studies, Comparative Studies, English, History, Jewish Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature. Three departments associated with the arts — Music, Theatre and Dance, and Visual Arts and Art History — are grouped under the heading of "School of the Arts."

Anthropology

Faculty:
Harris, M. S., Chair.; Brown, C. T.; Ellis, A.; Garriga-Lopez, A.; Martinez, V.; Napora, K.; Rynkiewich, K.

Link to Master's Programs


Anthropology
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

(Minimum of 120 credits required)

The Anthropology Department offers an undergraduate program that provides a framework for understanding human cultures and societies through culture, archaeology, adaptation and evolution. The department also offers an Honors Program for qualified students and a minor.

Anthropology prepares students for understanding the past and the present of a rapidly globalizing world by developing knowledge of contemporary national, ethnic and cultural complexities. Graduates with a major in Anthropology have a knowledge and understanding of the cultures of Western and non-Western peoples and are qualified to work in local, national and international agencies and the corporate world. An undergraduate degree in Anthropology provides the foundation for a graduate degree in Anthropology and any of the other social sciences. Students who have graduated with a degree in Anthropology from FAU have also gone on to graduate work in law, medicine, journalism, education and other graduate programs.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the General Education Program) and requirements for the College and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the  Transition Guides.

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Outline of the Anthropology Major
In addition to the College and University requirements, an Anthropology major must satisfy the following departmental requirements:

  1. Three credits in an introductory course;
  2. Six credits in biological anthropology courses (3000 level or above);
  3. Six credits in archaeology courses (3000 level or above);
  4. Six credits in sociocultural courses (3000 level or above);
  5. Six credits in research methods courses;
  6. Nine credits in electives (anthropology courses at the 3000 level or above from any of the subfields);
  7. Thirty-six credits total in anthropology; a grade of "C" or better is required for a course in anthropology to count toward the major.

Introductory Courses (3 credits)

University Honors Seminar in Anthropology

ANT 1930

3

Introduction to Anthropology

ANT 2000

3

Frauds, Myths and Mysteries: Science and Pseudoscience in Archaeology

ANT 3016

3

Culture and Society

ANT 2410

3

Introduction to Biological Anthropology with Lab

ANT 2511&L

3

Anthropology Study Abroad

ANT 2952

1-6

Upper-Division Courses (33 credits)

Biological Anthropology Courses (6 credits minimum)

Human Variation

ANT 3516

3

Human Evolution

ANT 3586

3

Environment and Disease

ANT 4463

3

Biological Anthropology

ANT 4514

3

Forensic Anthropology

ANT 4520

3

Primate Behavior

ANT 4552

3

Directed Independent Study

ANT 4905

1-3

Directed Independent Research

ANT 4917

1-3

Directed Independent Research (S/U)

ANT 4918

0-3

Special Topics

ANT 4930

1-3

Anthropology Study Abroad

ANT 4957

1-6

Archaeology Courses (6 credits minimum)

Stones and Bones: Unearthing the Past 

ANT 3114

3

Archaeology of Europe 

ANT 3143

3

The Maya and Their Neighbors

ANT 3163

3

South America Before Columbus

ANT 3165

3

Real Archaeology

ANT 3190

3

Native-American Culture and Society

ANT 3312

3

Development of Ancient Civilization

ANT 4141

3

Florida Archaeology

ANT 4158

3

Directed Independent Study

ANT 4905

1-3

Directed Independent Research

ANT 4917

1-3

Directed Independent Research (S/U)

ANT 4918

0-3

Special Topics

ANT 4930

1-3

Anthropology Study Abroad

ANT 4957

1-6

Sociocultural Anthropology Courses (6 credits minimum)

Peoples Around the World

ANT 3212

3

Anthropology of Religion

ANT 3241

3

Cultures of South Asia (WAC course)

ANT 3361

3

Anthropology of Film: An Introduction to Visual Anthropology

ANT 3391

3

Anthropological Linguistics

ANT 3610

3

Gender and Culture

ANT 4302

3

Human and Cultural Rights

ANT 4006

3

Economic Anthropology

ANT 4266

3

The Anthropology of Politics

ANT 4274

3

African-American Anthropology

ANT 4315

3

Asian Medical Systems

ANT 4365

3

Anthropology of Peace and Violence

ANT 4409

3

Social Anthropology

ANT 4412

3

Anthropology of Sex and Gender

ANT 4413

3

Cultural Anthropology

ANT 4414

3

Anthropology of Nature

ANT 4419

3

Systems and Institutions in Anthropological Perspective 

ANT 4425

3

Psychological Anthropology

ANT 4433

3

Culture, Gender and Health

ANT 4469

3

Global Health and Culture 

ANT 4480

3

Epidemics, Culture, Science and Policy

ANT 4532

3

Directed Independent Study

ANT 4905

1-3

Directed Independent Research

ANT 4917

1-3

Directed Independent Research (S/U)

ANT 4918

0-3

Special Topics

ANT 4930

1-3

Anthropology Study Abroad

ANT 4957

1-6

Research Methods Courses (6 credits minimum)

Archaeological Research Methods

ANT 4116

3

Research Methods in Bioarchaeology

ANT 4192

3

Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology

ANT 4495

3

Ethnographic Fieldwork

ANT 4802

3-6

Fieldwork in Archaeology

ANT 4824

3-6

Directed Independent Study

ANT 4905

1-3

Directed Independent Research

ANT 4917

1-3

Directed Independent Research (S/U)

ANT 4918

0-3

Foreign Language Requirement
Anthropology majors are required to take 8 credits of appropriate college-level courses in one modern foreign language. College-level transfer credits or credits earned through CLEP or Advanced Placement Examination may satisfy or be applied toward the foreign language requirement for graduation.

Free Electives
The remaining credits of upper-division work are defined as free electives. Students are advised to select courses relevant to their interests in anthropology. STA 2023 (Introductory Statistics) is recommended for students interested in a quantitative approach to anthropology, and LIN 3010 is recommended as an introduction to linguistics.

Three elective credits from departments outside Anthropology, but taught by anthropologists at FAU (e.g., courses in Comparative Studies, History, Art History, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies), may be substituted for the free- electives part of the major with permission of the Anthropology Department chair.

Many anthropology courses fulfill some requirements for interdisciplinary certificate programs at FAU, such as the Ethnic Studies, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Caribbean and Latin American Studies certificates.

Honors Program in Anthropology

The Honors Program in Anthropology encourages students to engage in the subject more intensely and engage in significant original research while undergraduates. Because Anthropology is a field and laboratory science, students should seek opportunities, in consultation with their faculty advisor(s), to conduct or participate in original research.

Admission Requirements

  1. FAU students must have completed between 60 and 90 credits with an overall GPA of at least 3.5 and a GPA in Anthropology courses of at least 3.5.
  2.  Transfer students must complete 9 upper-division Anthropology credits with a GPA of at least 3.5 in those classes at FAU before they are eligible to apply for the Honors Program. Transfer students must also earn an overall GPA of at least 3.5 to be eligible for admission to the program.
  3.  Students should complete an application provided by the department, including a personal statement addressed to the chair of the department explaining why they seek honors in the field. Students should also solicit a letter from one Anthropology Department faculty member supporting their application. Completed applications will be reviewed by faculty. Admission to the Honors Program is contingent on approval by the department faculty.


Standards for Maintaining Active Status

  1. Once accepted, students must maintain a GPA of 3.5 overall and in the Anthropology major. Students may request a temporary probationary status for a semester in the Honors Program if their GPA falls below the required level. However, subsequent failure to raise the GPA will result in dismissal from the Honors Program.
  2. Continued enrollment in the program is contingent upon strict adherence to the Code of Academic Integrity. Any violation of the Code will be grounds for dismissal from the Honors Program.


Honors-Level Enrichment

To receive the designation of Honors in the Major, students in the program shall enhance their education in Anthropology by completing 39 credits in Anthropology courses and performing at least three of the following:

  1.  Interdisciplinary research as part of the Honors Thesis (see below);
  2. Original research as part of the Honors Thesis;
  3. Successful completion of Honors Compacts in at least two upper-division Anthropology courses;
  4. Leadership, including, for example:
    1. Documented service on an official University committee;
    2.  Documented service as an officer of an anthropology club, society or other organization, whether affiliated with FAU or not;
    3. Documented service to the Department of Anthropology as, for example, chair or organizer of a research symposium or speakers’ colloquium;
  5. Documented field and laboratory experience such as:
    Attendance at a field school or participation as a laboratory assistant;
  6.  Documented civic engagement on anthropological issues in the public arena.


Thesis Requirement

  1.  Students in the Honors Program must consult with at least one faculty member of their choice about their honors research prior to embarking on the research;
  2. Students shall complete with a grade of “B+” or higher a minimum of a two-semester sequence (6 credits) of Honors Thesis in Anthropology (ANT 4972) culminating in the presentation of an honors thesis approved by the faculty;
  3. Students shall defend the thesis research orally before the faculty;
  4. Students shall publicly disseminate the results of their research, for example:
    1. Through a poster or presentation at a conference or symposium, such
      as the FAU Undergraduate Research Symposium or a departmental symposium; or
    2. Through submission of the manuscript of research report or article to a research journal, such as FAU's Undergraduate Research Journal.

Students will receive the designation “Honors in Anthropology” at the time of graduation upon satisfactory completion of the foregoing requirements if they also fulfill all normal distribution requirements for the Anthropology major and provided they have earned a GPA of at least 3.5 overall and a GPA of at least 3.5 in all Anthropology courses at graduation. Students who fail to meet any of these requirements, will receive credit for all work successfully completed but will not be certified as having received honors.

Students interested in the Honors Program in Anthropology should contact the chair of the Department of Anthropology.

Anthropology
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

  1.  For students majoring in another field, a minor in Anthropology shall consist of a minimum of 15 credits in upper-division anthropology courses, earned in any five courses at the 3000 level or above.
  2. A minimum of 12 credits must be taken in residence at FAU.
  3. A grade of "C" or better is required for a course in anthropology to count toward the minor.


Anthropology Study Abroad Programs

The Department of Anthropology participates in Florida Atlantic University's Study Abroad Programs and offers ANT 2952 and ANT 4957. The department also operates a Field School in Ecuador with programs in archaeology and ethnographic methods in which students may participate during the summer terms. To participate, students enroll in ANT 4802 or ANT 4824.


Master's Programs

Anthropology
Master of Arts (M.A.)

(Minimum of 30 credits required)

The M.A. degree in Anthropology focuses on the interplay of method, data and theory in anthropology and allows for specialization in the subfields of cultural anthropology, biological anthropology or archaeology. The graduate program's emphasis is on the linkage of "materials" analysis (e.g., bone, shell, ceramic, lithic, interview/observational and behavioral data) to major schools of anthropological thought. The department's program aims to contextualize and advance the understanding of being human in the past and the present. The degree prepares students for doctoral work in anthropology.

Admission Requirements
The applicant must have earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with a GPA of 3.0 or higher in the last 60 credits taken for that degree. The GRE is recommended but not required. The application requires (1) a Statement of Purpose and (2) two letters of recommendation sent directly to the department. The application must have the approval of the department. Where there is a deficiency in a requirement for admission or some other problem, the applicant may be admitted conditionally as decided by the department.

Degree Requirements
The M.A. curriculum requires completing a minimum of 30 credits and maintaining a 3.0 GPA in all coursework. The minimum passing grade in each course is "B."

Core Requirements - 19 credits minimum

Seminar in Anthropological Theory

ANG 6034

3

Proposal Development and Writing

ANG 6095

3

Seminar in Archaeology

ANG 6115

3

Seminar in Biological Anthropology

ANG 6587

3

Seminar in Cultural Anthropology

ANG 6490

3

Quantitative Reasoning in Anthropological Research

ANG 6486

3

Master's Thesis
(may take multiple times)

ANG 6971

1-6

Methods Requirement: At least one course from this list

Research Methods in Archaeology

ANG 6199

3

Research Methods in Sociocultural Anthropology

ANG 6492

3

Research Methods in Bioarchaeology

ANG 6535

3

At least 8 credits from this list

Internship in Anthropology
(may take multiple times)

ANG 5940

2-4

Advanced Anthropological Research 1

ANG 6090

3

Advanced Anthropological Research 2

ANG 6092

3

Directed Independent Study
(may take multiple times)

ANG 6905

1-4

Special Topics

ANG 6930

1-3

Prior to registering for courses in the first semester of graduate study, the student must consult with the department's graduate advisor to determine the likely sequencing of coursework in the student's program.

The Admissions Committee may determine that the applicant must enroll in undergraduate anthropology courses as a condition for graduate work. These remedial courses are not applicable to graduate credit.

Students must demonstrate proficiency of a language appropriate to their field of specialization. Students can fulfill this requirement by completing a two-semester sequence in a language or a Reading for Research course (e.g., FRE/GER/SPN 5060). Alternatively, students may demonstrate proficiency in a language by examination as determined by the department.

A public thesis proposal defense is required. Work on the thesis is expected to begin upon successful defense of the proposed research. Students must be enrolled for a minimum of 1 or up to a maximum of 6 credits in ANG 6971 during the semesters they are working on the thesis and the semester in which they expect to graduate.

Admission to Candidacy
After completion of the thesis proposal defense, a student is eligible for admission to candidacy. The student must file an approved Plan of Study form no later than the third semester of the student's program. In preparing the plan, the student should take professional objectives into consideration as well as all department and University requirements. A completed Research Compliance Verification form must be attached to the Plan of Study form. After the plan has been filed, subsequent major changes must be approved by the chair of the department, the student's advisor and the dean of the Graduate College.


Anthropology
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)

(Minimum of 36 credits required)

The Department of Anthropology also offers a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) degree designed for any student wishing to prepare for teaching at the elementary, secondary or community college level. This program is particularly appropriate for current teachers who are looking to build anthropological knowledge into their curricula and advance their teaching credentials.

Admission requirements are the same as for the M.A. program. The M.A.T. total course requirements are 36 credits earned in core courses, pedagogy, DIS courses (6 credits), teaching internship (6 credits) and completion of a modified thesis (3 credits).


Art

(Art programs are listed following Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, under School of the Arts, Visual Arts and Art History.)


Arts and Humanities

(Arts and Humanities is listed under Interdisciplinary Studies.)

School of Architecture

Faculty:
Choma, J., Director; Lyn, F. E., Associate Director; Abbate, A. J.; Bolojan, D.; Caldierón, J-M.; Camargo, D.; d'Anjou, P.; Granger, W.; Huber, J.; Ligler, H.; Rodgers, T.; Sandell, J.; Vermisso, E.; White, D.; Yousif, S.

The School of Architecture prepares students for the professional practice of architecture. Situated in the broader context of the humanities and social sciences, the curriculum is composed of specialized courses in history, theory, technology and design communication built around a core of a progressive sequence of architectural design studios.

The School offers the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.), an accredited first professional degree. It offers a preprofessional lower-division program and an upper-division professional degree program. Both are limited-access programs. The School also offers a minor in Architectural Studies.

For students interested in pursuing graduate-level studies in planning in addition to their professional degree in architecture, the School of Architecture and School of Urban and Regional Planning offer an Advanced Standing degree program. See the School of Urban and Regional Planning section for more information.

Program Accreditation
In the United States, most registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit professional degree programs in architecture offered by institutions with U.S. regional accreditation, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted an eight-year, three-year or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may require a preprofessional undergraduate degree in architecture for admission. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The School of Architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program: B.Arch. (159 credits, undergraduate and graduate, as required). Next accreditation visit for all programs: 2025.

Link to Architectural Studies Minor

Link to Advanced Standing Bachelor of Architecture/Master of Urban and Regional Planning Program


Architecture

Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.)

(Minimum of 159 credits required)

Lower-division courses are offered at the Boca Raton campus
Upper-division courses are offered at the Fort Lauderdale campus

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the General Education Program) and requirements for the college and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or state college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution.

Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the  Transition Guides . All prerequisite courses must be completed by the School's designated date or within the first year after transferring to FAU and before reaching senior status (90 total credits).

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Application to Lower-Division Preprofessional Program
Prior to applying to the School of Architecture, admission to the University is required. (Refer to the Admissions section of this catalog.)

Lower-Division Preprofessional Course Sequence
In addition to the General Education requirements, the following courses are required. 

A minimum grade of "C" is required for each architecture (ARC-prefixed) course. A grade of "C-" or below does not meet this requirement. When a grade below a "C" is earned, the course will not count toward any portion of the 159-credit requirement.

Year 1 (Freshman Level)

Architectural Design 1

ARC 1301

4

Culture and Architecture

ARC 2208

3

Architectural Design 2

ARC 1302

4

Materials and Methods 1

ARC 2461

3

Year 2 (Sophomore Level)

Architectural Design 3

ARC 2303

4

Architectural Theory 1

ARC 2201

3

Architectural Design 4

ARC 2304

4

Architectural Structures 1

ARC 2580

3

Methods of Calculus

MAC 2233

3

College Physics 1

PHY 2053

4

Application to Upper-Division Professional Degree Program
The following students are eligible to apply to the professional degree program:

  1. Students who have successfully completed the lower-division preprofessional program at Florida Atlantic University or equivalent coursework at any college or university;
  2. Students with an approved Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree in Architecture from Broward College, Hillsborough Community College, Indian River State College, Miami Dade College, Palm Beach State College, St. Petersburg College or Valencia Community College;
  3. Transfer students from an accredited degree program in architecture.
  4. Transfer students from a preprofessional degree program in architecture.
  5. Transfer students with international equivalency.

Students applying to the professional degree program with an approved A.A. preprofessional degree in Architecture or transfer students from an accredited program in architecture must submit evidence of having completed the necessary prerequisite courses or course equivalents. Course equivalents for in-state colleges are determined by state guidelines. Course equivalence from other accredited programs is verified by faculty review of the corresponding published course descriptions and syllabi. Only grades of "C" or better are accepted for all required courses. Courses for which grades of "C-" or lower are indicated in official transcripts shall not be accepted for credit toward the 159-credit requirement.

Applicants with any portion of their education completed abroad must have their foreign credentials evaluated by an accredited independent evaluation service. This evaluation should reflect a course-by-course evaluation with a cumulative grade point average for each institution attended. The course descriptions and syllabi must be translated into English by such evaluation agency or by the institution from which the student is transferring. The National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (www.NACES.org) has a list of agencies. In addition, applicants with international academic backgrounds must demonstrate English proficiency by earning a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). International applicants must also verify nation of citizenship with the appropriate documentation.  Applicants who wish to transfer from out-of-state or international institutions must submit course descriptions from their institutions’ catalog of each architecture, mathematics and physics course earned with a grade of “C” or better. 

Transfer applicants seeking approval for equivalency or substitution of published courses in the curriculum at the 3000-4000 level, taken outside Florida's State University System, must submit copies of the original course syllabus and assignments. In addition, students must submit evidence of completed coursework (papers, exercises, drawings, examinations, etc.) demonstrating levels of accomplishment (understanding or ability) required for each course. The School of Architecture, at its sole discretion, may accept or deny equivalency or substitution of required courses based on reference to the Student Performance Criteria (SPC) for each course as determined by the faculty. In the event a course is denied, it may qualify for elective credits.

Applications to the School of Architecture are accepted only from students who have been accepted for admission to Florida Atlantic University. Applicants must demonstrate the potential to successfully complete the professional degree program. Admission and placement is determined by the faculty upon review of each application to ensure students have met all academic requirements through the demonstration of the following. The decision by the faculty to recommend admission and placement is final and may not be appealed.

  1. Overall Grade Point Average (GPA);
  2. TOEFL score of 550 or greater for students whose primary language is not English;
  3. Official transcripts of academic records;
  4. Copies of published course descriptions and syllabi for the purpose of determining conformance of courses submitted as equivalent to the required courses in the curriculum;
  5. Assigned sample of writing;
  6. Portfolio of student work;
  7. Completed application to the School of Architecture.

Automatic Admission into the Upper Division Bachelor of Architecture Program for Students from FAU Lower Division Foundations Pre-Architecture Program 
Any student currently or formerly registered in the FAU Lower Division Foundations Pre-Architecture program will be automatically accepted into the FAU Bachelor of Architecture Program if they meet the following qualifications:

  • Successful completion of all courses listed below with a minimum grade of B:

o ARC 1301 Architectural Design 1
o ARC 1302 Architectural Design 2
o ARC 2303 Architectural Design 3

  • Successful completion of all courses listed below:

o ARC 2208 Culture and Architecture: The Master Builder
o ARC 2201 Architectural Theory 1
o ARC 2461 Materials and Methods 1
o MAC 2233 Methods of Calculus (or higher)
o PHY 2053 College Physics (or higher)

  • Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.

In addition, the following courses must be successfully completed prior to enrollment in any Upper Division design studio:

o ARC 2304 Architectural Design 4
o ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1

Successful completion is defined as a minimum grade of C or better for all ARC courses, MAC 2233 and
PHY 2053. Notifications of Automatic Admission will be sent in early February. Students who do not meet these qualifications must submit an application and portfolio for admission into the Upper Division Bachelor of Architecture Program.

Priority Consideration for Admission into the Upper Division Bachelor of Architecture Program For Applicants from the Florida State University System or Florida College System
Any applicant who has completed coursework at an institution in the Florida State University System or the Florida College System, and who meets the requirements listed below may apply for Priority Consideration for Admission into the Bachelor of Architecture Program at FAU.

  • Successful completion of the following courses with a minimum grade of B:

o ARC 1301 Architectural Design 1
o ARC 1302 Architectural Design 2
o ARC 2303 Architectural Design 3
o ARC 2208 Culture and Architecture: The Master Builder
o ARC 2201 Architectural Theory 1
o ARC 2461 Materials and Methods 1

  • Successful completion of all courses listed below:

o MAC 2233 Methods of Calculus (or higher)
o PHY 2053 College Physics (or higher)

  • Cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher.

Successful completion is defined as a minimum grade of C or better for all ARC courses, MAC 2233 and
PHY 2053. Students who are offered Priority Consideration Admission will not be required to submit a portfolio. Students who do not meet these qualifications must submit an application and portfolio for
admission into the Upper Division Bachelor of Architecture Program.

Students accepted under priority consideration must complete their AA degree prior to start of the Bachelor of Architecture program. In addition, the following courses must be successfully completed prior to enrollment in any Upper Division design studio:

  • ARC 2304 Architectural Design 4
  • ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1

Deadlines for Priority Consideration Application
The following Priority Consideration Application deadlines occur in early spring.

  • Priority Consideration Application Submission – Mid January
  • Decision Letters Sent – Early February
  • Priority Deposit Submission to Reserve Position (non-refundable) – Early March

To view specific annual deadlines, see Architecture Admissions.

Application Deadlines for Fall Enrollments
School of Architecture applications, including portfolios, are due prior to the end of business on the last Friday of February.

Portfolio Submissions and Requirements
Students applying for admission to the School of Architecture must submit a portfolio of work. Portfolios that are not submitted with the application shall not be accepted. Refer to the School of Architecture Portfolio Submission Requirements.

Summer Admission Eligibility
Students who have successfully completed all of the following prerequisites may be eligible for summer admission:

  • ARC 1301 Architectural Design 1
  • ARC 1302 Architectural Design 2
  • ARC 2303 Architectural Design 3
  • ARC 2304 Architectural Design 4
  • ARC 2208 Culture and Architecture: The Master Builder
  • ARC 2461 Materials and Methods 1
  • ARC 2201 Architectural Theory 1
  • ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1
  • PHY 2053 College Physics 1
  • MAC 2233 Methods of Calculus
  • ENC 1101 College Writing 1
  • ENC 1102 College Writing 2
  • All General Education requirements

Please contact an academic advisor for more information.

Upper-Division Professional Degree Course Sequence
All students admitted to the B.Arch. program are expected to enter the professional course sequence with the ability to prepare graphic presentations utilizing normative, descriptive, architectural drawing techniques. 

A minimum grade of "C" is required for each architecture (ARC-prefixed) course, including electives. A grade of "C-" or below does not meet this requirement. When a grade below a "C" is earned, the course will not count toward any portion of the 159-credit requirement. The 159-credit requirement must be met by all students seeking the first professional B.Arch. degree.

Year 3 (Junior Level)

Architectural Visualization Methods 1 

ARC 3133

3

Architectural Design 5

ARC 3320

4

Materials and Methods of Construction

ARC 3463

3

Pre-Modern Architecture History and Theory

ARC 3710

3

Site Planning and Engineering

ARC 3374

3

Architectural Design 6

ARC 3321 or

 

Vertical Studio

ARC 4322

4

Architectural Structures 2

ARC 3503

3

Environmental Technology 1

ARC 3610

3

Architectural Visualization Methods 2 

ARC 3185C

3

Architectural Research Methods and Analysis

ARC 3091

3

Year 4 (Senior Level)

Architectural Theory

ARC 4219

3

Architectural Design 7

ARC 4326 or

 

Vertical Studio

ARC 4322

4

Modern Arch. History and Theory

ARC 4712

3

Architectural Design 8

ARC 4327 or

 

Vertical Studio

ARC 4322

4

Environmental Technology 2

ARC 4620

3

Architectural Structures 3

ARC 4504

3

Electives

 

12

Note: Students may enroll once in ARC 4322, Vertical Studio, as a substitute for one of the following: ARC 3321, ARC 4326 or ARC 4327. Prerequisites and corequisites for each of the above courses must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. (See Course Descriptions section for ARC 3321, ARC 4326 and ARC 4327 for further information.

Year 5 (Thesis Level)

Advanced Architectural Design 1

ARC 5328

6

Professional Practice: Project Versus Practice

ARC 5271

1

Professional Practice: Craft and Collaboration in Design and Making

ARC 5272

1

Professional Practice: Financial and Business Management for the Practice of Architecture

ARC 5275

1

Professional Practice: Principles of Practice

ARC 5280

1

Professional Practice: Communication Methods for Design and Construction

ARC 5283

1

Professional Practice: Contractual Relationships and Risk Management

ARC 5287

1

Topical Design Studio

ARC 5352

6

Introduction to Urban Design

ARC 6305

3

Electives (3000, 4000, 5000 level)

 

12

School of Architecture Student Handbook
Policies and protocols regarding registration, ethical conduct, discipline and other matters are found in the current edition of the School of Architecture Student Handbook. The School of Architecture may publish amendments and modifications as needed on an ongoing basis.

Intellectual Property
Student work submitted to the School of Architecture to satisfy course or degree requirements is the property of the School. Students, as authors of the original work, retain all rights to the intellectual property of such work, including papers, drawings, models and other materials. At the discretion of the faculty, all student submissions may be retained, returned or discarded.

Enhanced Learning Opportunities
The School of Architecture may organize field trips and travel study programs (domestic and international) to provide an opportunity to enrich the educational experience. While students are encouraged to participate in these activities, additional fees may apply. Students interested in international study opportunities should register with the Office of International Programs.

Scholarships and Grants
The School of Architecture offers a number of stipends, grants and other financial assistance on an annual basis. Students are encouraged to apply. (See the School of Architecture Student Handbook for more information.)


Architectural Studies

Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in Architectural Studies offers students the possibility to gain insight into the discipline of Architecture, broadening students' global backgrounds on the relationship between the built environments and cultural meaning. The minor is available to all full-time, degree-seeking FAU students, except those enrolled in the Pre-Architecture or Bachelor of Architecture programs. However, students transferring out of the Pre-Architecture or Bachelor of Architecture programs may opt to receive recognition for their efforts spent in the major by completing the requirements for the minor.

Students must complete 15 credits from the lists of courses below, with 9 credits required in upper-level courses. A grade of "C" or better is required for all courses taken in the minor. A minimum of 75 percent of all minor courses must be completed at FAU. To apply for the minor, students must complete an application and submit it to the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters. The application may be submitted once the final course is in progress. The minor will be noted on students' transcripts.

For completion of the undergraduate minor, the School of Architecture offers the following courses annually:

Architectural Design 1

ARC 1301*

4

Architectural Design 2

ARC 1302*

4

Architectural Theory 1
(instructor permission required)

ARC 2201

3

Culture and Architecture: The Master Builder

ARC 2208

3

Architectural Design 3

ARC 2303*

4

Architectural Design 4

ARC 2304*

4

Materials and Methods 1
(instructor permission required)

ARC 2461

3

Architectural Research Methods and
Analysis

ARC 3091

3

Architectural Visualization Methods 1 

ARC 3133*

3

Pre-Modern Architectural History and Theory

ARC 3710

3

Architectural Theory

ARC 4219

3

Designing Safer Communities with CPTED

ARC 4384

3

* These courses are available only to students enrolled in the Pre-Architecture or Bachelor of Architecture programs and may count toward the minor for those students transferring out of either of those two programs.

Additional courses available for the minor appear below. These are offered on a rotation basis:

Color Material Space

ARC 4134

3

Ethics and Architecture

ARC 4202

3

Architectural Detail Generation

ARC 4482

3

Modern Architectural History and Theory 2

ARC 4712

3

Architects and Engineers: Histories of a Relationship

ARC 4742

3

Historic Preservation

ARC 4801

3

Special Topics

ARC 4930

1-6

Architecture and Urbanism Study Abroad

ARC 4950

3

Architecture Study Abroad

ARC 4955

1-6

Literature and Criticism in Architecture

ARC 5221

3

Sustainability and Tropical Architecture

ARC 6598

3


Architecture to Urban and Regional
Planning
Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) to Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.)
Advanced Standing Program

This combined program is jointly offered by the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters and the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science. For a complete description and all requirements for the B.Arch./M.U.R.P. Advanced Standing Program, see the program listing in the College of Science's Department of Urban and Regional Planning section.


School of Communication and Multimedia Studies

Faculty:
Mills, C., Director; Abad, A.; Ashe, I.; Bargsten, J.; Benitez, L.; Bruns, L.; Carrico, C.; Charbonneau, S.; DeVinney, D.; Durnell-Uwechue, N.; Eason, S.; Elfenbein, M.; Greene, D.; Gutsche, C.; Gutsche, R.; Harris, R.; Hofmann, M.; Lopez De Victoria, S.; McFerguson, M.; Nieto Fernandez, B.; Petrich, K.; Poole, D.; Prusher, I.; Robb, J.; Robé, C.; Santaniello, N.; Sim, G.; Sobnosky, M.; Trapani, W.; Veenstra, A.; Von Spalding, R.; Winn-Trapani, L.; Wolfson, S.

Mission
The mission of the FAU School of Communication and Multimedia Studies (SCMS), carried out through its courses, research and services, is to help provide the knowledge and skills that will allow students to understand and contribute to the increasingly communication- and media-oriented environment. Communication courses are designed to help students become: 1) more ethical, effective communicators in all contexts, from interpersonal to large public gatherings, print, radio, television, film and emerging technologies, and 2) more critical and analytical consumers of communication in all its many aspects.

In the undergraduate program, the School offers a variety of liberal arts and technically oriented courses that cover theoretical, historical, multicultural, analytical, critical and performance approaches to communication processes and media. At the same time, the program allows students to emphasize areas of particular interest: communication studies; film and media, and multimedia journalism.

The School's overarching goal for its graduates is to provide them with a broad liberal arts education. Students will be afforded the opportunity to gain a technical and/or professional orientation sufficient to qualify them for a first job in any business or institution that needs employees who are effective communicators. Students will also be afforded the background needed to pursue further education in communication or related fields.

The School offers a B.A. in Communication Studies and a B.A. in Multimedia Studies with a concentration in Film and Media or a concentration in Multimedia Journalism. It also offers advanced degrees in Communication and Multimedia Studies, with an M.A. in Communication and an M.F.A. in Media, Technology and Entertainment. (The M.F.A. is currenlty on suspension and not accepting students.)

Link to Minors

Link to Master's Programs


Communication Studies
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

(Minimum of 120 credits required)

Link to Multimedia Studies

Students who enroll for a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Communication Studies must meet all University and Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters requirements. These include satisfactory completion of a total of 120 credits, 60 of which must be earned at a four-year college or university, and 8 credits in sequence in a single foreign language. A student whose GPA falls below 2.0 will be dropped from the major. A GPA of 2.0 or higher is required to transfer to the major.

The B.A. in Communication Studies is a problem-focused program that emphasizes contemporary cultural concerns while situating these within the broader historical context of communication and cultural theory. The purpose of the degree is to provide students with the awareness, knowledge, motivation and skills to develop communication strategies to address the problems of a global society, and the emphasis is on all forms of civic engagement. The program examines the strategic role that symbol systems play in constructing meaning in a fast-changing, information-based, media-saturated and culturally diverse world. Courses examine how meaning informs and persuades individuals, and introduce students to the history and theories of how communication operates in societies.  The goals are for students to develop both high level oral and written communication skills and critical thinking and analytical problem-solving skills, and to become active in civic life.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the General Education Program) and requirements for the College and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transition Guides.

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Core

Introduction to Communication and Civic Life

COM 2053

3

Senior Capstone: Capstone in Communication and Civic Life

SPC 4271

3

Theory (three courses required)

Human Communication Theory

COM 3405

3

New Media and Civic Discourse

COM 4603

3

Classical Rhetoric

SPC 3233

3

Contemporary Rhetoric

SPC 3235

3

Rhetorical Foundations of Publics and Counterpublics

SPC 3272

3

Rhetorical Theories of Persuasion

SPC 3542

3

Intercultural Theory

SPC 3717

3

Methods (two courses required)

American Multicultural Discourse

SPC 3704

3

Rhetorical Analysis of Democracy (WAC course)

SPC 4273

3

Rhetoric of Argument (WAC course)

SPC 4517

3

Rhetorical Criticism (WAC course)

SPC 4680

3

Communication Skills (two courses required) 

Storytelling in Popular Culture

COM 4703

3

Interpersonal Communication

SPC 2300

3

Public Speaking

SPC 2608

3

Small Group Processes

SPC 3425

3

Argumentation and Debate

SPC 4513

3

Contexts (three courses required)

Communication, Gender and Language

COM 3014

3

Organizational Communication

COM 3120

3

Conflict and Communication

COM 3462

3

Political Communication

COM 3500

3

Communication Internship

COM 3945

3

Media and Sexual Identities

COM 4094

3

Strategic Communication

COM 4150

3

Corporate Communication

COM 4201

3

Rhetoric and Aesthetics of Contemporary Culture

COM 4411

3

Non-Verbal Communication in a Diverse Society

COM 4461

3

Peace, Conflict and Oral Narrative

COM 4707

3

Minorities and the Media

MMC 3601

3

International Communication

MMC 4301

3

Media, Representation and Diversity

MMC 4704

3

Public and Community Relations

PUR 4411

3

Gender and Television

RTV 4412

3

Intercultural Communication

SPC 3710

3

Studies in Rhetoric

SPC 4232 

3

Leadership and Communication

SPC 4443

3

Propaganda

SPC 4540

3

Rhetoric of Social Protest

SPC 4633

3

Gender, Race and Communication

SPC 4712

3

Ethnicity and Communication

SPC 4718

3


Honors Program in Communication

The Honors Program in Communication allows highly motivated and well-prepared students to pursue a course of study organized around a specific topic, area of interest or creative project. Students take a special sequence of courses both within and outside the School. In their last semester they complete a senior honors thesis or a senior honors project under the direction of a School faculty advisor.

Minors

Communication Studies
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 18 credits required)

A minor in Communication Studies requires that the student complete both MMC 1540 and COM 2053 plus 12 credits in courses with COM, SPC or MMC prefixes, no less than 9 credits of which must be at the 3000 level or above. At least 15 of the 18 credits must be taken at FAU.

Film and Video
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 16 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in
Film and Video gives students in any major the opportunity to bring together courses from several departments and colleges into a multidisciplinary curriculum emphasizing all aspects of film and video.

Political Communication
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in Political Communication gives students in any major the opportunity to bring together courses from Communication and Multimedia Studies and Political Science into a multidisciplinary curriculum. Students are offered scholarly study of political networks as well as hands-on courses in political advocacy and campaigning.

Public Relations
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in Public Relations provides students with a solid foundation of the principles and practices in the field of public relations. The minor helps prepare students for careers in publicity, promotion, public affairs, government relations and media relations.

This minor is open to all degree-seeking students and will be awarded upon completion of a bachelor’s degree. A student who already holds a baccalaureate degree may pursue the minor in conjunction with a second bachelor’s degree. All courses taken in the program may be counted toward other general and specific graduation requirements, and courses taken to fulfill other requirements may be applied to this minor.

Requirements for the minor include completion of five courses (15 credits) with a minimum grade of "C" and a 2.5 GPA. Students are required to take 12 credits from the required list with one elective option. At least 12 credits for the minor must be earned from FAU. In addition to the regular curriculum, other courses with significant attention to public relations may be approved by the SCMS director.

Required Courses - 12 credits

Communication Internship (or other approved elective)

COM 3945

3

Corporate Communications

COM 4201

3

Public Relations and the Press

PUR 3009

3

Public and Community Relations

PUR 4411

3

Elective Option - 3 credits; select one course from the following*

Organizational Communication

COM 3120

3

Strategic Communication

COM 4150

3

Fundamentals of Multimedia

DIG 3110

3

Photojournalism

JOU 4601

3

Writing for the Media

MMC 2121C

3

Intercultural Communication

SPC 3710

3

* or approved special topics course


Sport Studies
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 12 credits required)

The undergraduate minor in Sport Studies gives students in any major the opportunity to bring together courses from across Arts and Letters to explore various aspects of sports and society that will help strengthen their ability to see sports not just as game, but as a significant aspect of modern society.


Multimedia Studies
Bachelor of Arts (.B.A.)

Film and Media Concentration
Multimedia Journalism Concentration

(Minimum of 120 credits required)

Students who enroll for a Bachelor of Arts degree with Major in Multimedia Studies must choose one of two concentrations: the Film and Media concentration or the Multimedia Journalism concentration. In addition, students must meet all University and Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters requirements. These include satisfactory completion of a total of 120 credits, 60 of which must be earned at a four-year college or university, and 8 credits in sequence in a single foreign language. Students in the Multimedia Journalism concentration whose GPA falls below 2.0 will be dropped from the major. Students in the Film and Media concentration whose GPA falls below 2.5 will be dropped from the major. A GPA of 2.0 or higher is required for transfer to this major.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the General Education Program) and requirements for the College and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the
Transition Guides.

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.


Film and Media Concentration

The Film and Media concentration is a comprehensive curriculum that includes courses in media studies, media production, and digital media, including computer animation. Courses analyze the power and responsibility of American and international media from formal, historical, economic and ideological perspectives. This concentration is committed to helping students understand media texts in relation to the worlds they represent. Its course of study emphasizes not only the meanings of these texts, but also the processes by which these meanings are constructed and disseminated. The goal is to help undergraduates understand the study and creation of visual media within the larger contexts of human audiovisual and verbal expression and to shape students into sophisticated readers and producers of visual culture. Courses consider both mainstream and alternative media and include industrial and artistic approaches, linking production techniques and aesthetics to industry, history and politics.

Core - the following courses are required

Digital Culture

DIG 2202

3

Introduction to Media Studies

MMC 1540

3

Introduction to Media Production

MMC 2130

3

Capstone - one course from the following

 

 

Communication Internship

COM 3945

3

Multimedia Practicum

VIC 4943

4

History - one course from the following required

History and Theory of Computer Arts and Animation

DIG 4026

4

Film to the 1940s

FIL 4036

4

Film since the 1940s

FIL 4037

4

Practice Fundamentals - one course from the following required

Fundamentals of Digital Media Practice

DIG 3110

4

Fundamentals of 3D Computer Animation

DIG 3305C

4

Digital Film Production

RTV 3531

4

Theory and Criticism - two courses from the following required

Studies in New Media

COM 4332

3

Film Appreciation 

FIL 2000

3

Film Theory

FIL 3803

3

Film Criticism

FIL 4851

3

Media Criticism

MMC 4501

3

Practice and History/Criticism - five courses from the following required, with a minimum of 15 credits)*

Practice

Introduction to Game Programming

CAP 4028

3

Digital Film Editing

DIG 3207

4

Digital Audio Recording and Editing

DIG 3253C

4

Advanced 3D Computer Animation

DIG 3306C

4

Advanced 3D Computer Modeling for Animation

DIG 3323C

4

3D Video Game Design

DIG 3725C

3

Immersive Media for Games and Virtual Reality

DIG 3773C

3

Visual Design for Film, Animation and Games

DIG 4122C

4

Advanced Digital Compositing for Animation

DIG 4394C

4

Producing and Directing Fiction Film 

DIG 4412

4

Scriptwriting

FIL 4106

4

Exhibition Practices in Film, Video and Media

FIL 4613

4

Production Management for Film and TV

FIL 4647

3

Interactive Digital Media

MMC 3711

4

New Media Narrative

MMC 4713

4

Television Production

RTV 3543C

4

Experimental Cinema 

RTV 3229

4

Producing and Directing Documentary Film

RTV 3332C

4

History and Criticism

Media and Sexual Identities

COM 4094

3

Video Game Studies

DIG 4713

3

Women and Film

FIL 4056

3

Radical Film, New Media and Social Movements

FIL 4058

4

Traditions of Documentary Film

FIL 4364

4

Digital Documentary

FIL 4378

3

RI: Hollywood, Censorship and Regulation

FIL 4672

4

Studies in Asian Cinema

FIL 4843

3

Special Topics

FIL 4930

3

Cultural Study of Globality

IDS 4332

3

Minorities and the Media

MMC 3601

3

Media, Culture and Technology

MMC 4263

3

Media, Representation and Diversity

MMC 4704

3

Special Topics

MMC 4930

3

Gender and Television

RTV 4412

3

* Courses listed in History, Theory and Criticism and Practice may be substituted in this category if they are not used to fill other requirements.


Multimedia Journalism Concentration 

The Multimedia Journalism concentration prepares students to work in the new media convergence environment — where competition, deregulation and digital technology break down the barriers between print, radio, television and the Internet. Students are expected to develop strong basic writing and analytical skills. Then they are expected to become adept at writing and producing for multiple media platforms simultaneously, exhibiting the versatility necessary to succeed in a quickly evolving and growing media market, as well as to fully exercise the civic responsibilities of journalists for the lively functioning of democratic institutions.

Before enrolling in JOU 4181, Coverage of Public Affairs, students in the Multimedia Journalism concentration must take the Multimedia Journalism Skills Test (spelling, grammar and punctuation), which is offered at the University Testing and Certification Center every semester, or pass MMC 2121C with a minimum grade of "C." The test must be passed, may be taken a maximum of two times and may only be taken once in a given semester. 

JOU 4181 thus serves as the gateway course to the next Multimedia Journalism Performance and Production courses in the curricular sequence: RTV 4301, Broadcast Journalism; JOU 4342, Multimedia Journalism; and the capstone course RTV 4304, Advanced Broadcast Journalism (or its “Disciplinary Core” alternative VIC 4943, Multimedia Practicum).

Required Credits for the B.A. in Multimedia Studies: Multimedia Journalism Concentration (120 credits):
General Education Program (44 credits)
Multimedia Journalism Major (38 credits)
College of Arts and Letters Electives (12 credits)
Free Electives (26 credits)  

Core (the following courses are required)

U.S. Journalism

JOU 4004

3

Introduction to Media Studies

MMC 1540

3

Public Opinion

MMC 4640

3

Multimedia Practicum

VIC 4943

4 or

 Advanced Broadcast Journalism

RTV 4304

4

Production (the following courses are required)

News and News Reporting

JOU 3101

3

Coverage of Public Affairs

JOU 4181

3

Multimedia Journalism

JOU 4342

3

Broadcast Journalism

RTV 4301

4

Focus (select a minimum of 12 required credits from the list below)

Political Communication

COM 3500

3

Communication Internship

COM 3945

3

Studies in New Media

COM 4332

3

News Media Ethics

COM 4621

3

Fundamentals of Multimedia

DIG 3110

4

Web Research for Journalists

DIG 4820

3

Traditions of Documentary Film

FIL 4364

4

Feature and Freelance Writing

JOU 4308

3

Environmental Journalism

JOU 4314

3

International Reporting

JOU 4316

3

Photojournalism

JOU 4601

4

Special Topics

JOU 4930

3

Mass Communication Theory

MMC 3403

3

Mass Communication Law and Regulation

MMC 4200

3

Media, Culture and Technology

MMC 4263

3

Public and Community Relations

PUR 4411

3

Producing and Directing Documentary Film

RTV 3332C

4

Digital Film Production

RTV 3531

4

Television Production

RTV 3543C

4

U.S. Telecommunication Industry

RTV 4403

3

Intercultural Communication

SPC 3710

3

Communication Study Abroad
Students may receive from 1 to 4 credits for participating in one of the many University-approved Study Abroad Programs offering courses relevant to the major.

Communication Internship
Students may receive 3 credits for practical experience working 12 to 16 hours per week in a communication-related business or industry. The course culminates in a research paper or project in which the student evaluates the experience by methodologies learned in other communication courses. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 overall and a GPA of 3.0 in the School. Permission from the SCMS is required.

Master's Programs

Link to M.F.A. in Media, Technology and Entertainment


Communication
Master of Arts (M.A.)

(Minimum of 30 credits required)

The central objective of the Master of Arts program in the School of Communication and Multimedia Studies is to equip students with historical, theoretical and critical knowledge of oral, written, visual and aural symbol systems, the institutions and processes that produce them and the audiences/readers who engage them. Emphasis is placed on research skills, the cultivation of original scholarship in communication and cognate fields and the critical examination of primary and secondary source materials. The goal is to enhance and focus students' ongoing or future efforts in communication-related professions or activities or to prepare them for doctoral studies and/or academic careers. For information, refer to www.fau.edu/scms.

Admission Requirements

  1.  Applicants should have:
    1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution;
    2.  A minimum 3.0 grade point average in the last 60 undergraduate credits attempted;
    3.  Competitive Graduate Record Exam (GRE) demonstrating strength in verbal, analytic and writing scores.
  2. Applicants must submit a 500-word typewritten statement of their goals, aspirations and reasons for seeking the M.A. in Communication. Care should be taken to align educational and career goals with the program and faculty specialization offered by the School of Communication and Multimedia Studies.
  3. Applicants must submit two letters of recommendation detailing academic abilities and performance.
  4. Applicants should submit a sample of their academic writing (no fewer than 3,000 words). The writing sample should exhibit sufficient depth and sophistication of thought as well as quality and clarity of writing so as to justify admission into the master's program.
  5.  International applicants must also meet the additional requirements listed elsewhere in this catalog.
  6. Students need not have an undergraduate specialization in communication to apply for the M.A. program.
  7. Deadline for applications (online and postmarked): September 1 for spring admissions and March 1 for fall admission.

Admission Requirements for Degree Candidacy
A student may be admitted to candidacy for the degree of Master of Arts with Major in Communication after having satisfied the following requirements.

  1. The student must complete 9 or more credits of graduate coursework in Communication with a GPA of 3.0 or better.
  2. The student must complete all other College and University requirements.
  3. The student must be recommended by the department and thesis supervisory committee.
  4. The student must be formally accepted into the Master of Arts program by the SCMS. Non-degree-seeking, master's-level students are not permitted to enroll for more than 6 credits in SCMS courses without being formally accepted into the program.
  5. If a student is awarded a graduate teaching assistantship, that student is required to enroll in COM 6944, Theory and Practice of Teaching Communication, in their first year of study.

Requirements for Degree, Thesis Option 
(Minimum of 30 credits required)

  1.  Nine credits of required courses:
    1. COM 6400 (3 credits), Introduction to Graduate Studies in Communication;
    2. COM 6424 (3 credits), Communication Theory; 
    3. COM 6318 (3 credits), Communication Research and Design. 
  2.  Fifteen credits of approved electives, of which a minimum of 9 must be in Communication. Any coursework in a department other than Communication must be approved in writing by a Communication faculty advisor prior to enrollment.
  3. Six credits of thesis research.
  4. Courses taken to satisfy the foreign language requirement cannot be applied to the degree.
  5. Submission of an approved thesis.
  6. A minimum 3.0 GPA on all work completed.
  7. A grade of "B" or higher on all credit applied to the degree.

Requirements for Degree, Non-Thesis Option
(Minimum of 30 credits required)

  1. Nine credits of required courses:
    1. COM 6400 (3 credits), Introduction to Graduate Studies in Communication;
    2. COM 6424 (3 credits), Communication Theory; 
    3. COM 6318 (3 credits), Communication Research and Design. 
  2. Twenty-one credits of elective courses, of which 21 must be in Communication. Any coursework in a department other than Communication must be approved in writing by a Communication faculty advisor prior to enrollment.
  3. Satisfactory completion of a written comprehensive examination or professional project.
  4. Courses taken to satisfy the foreign language requirement do not count toward the 30-credit degree requirement.
  5. A minimum of 3.0 GPA on all work completed.
  6. A grade of "B" or higher on all credit applied to the degree.
  7. Additional requirements that the student's advisory committee may prescribe.


Media, Technology and Entertainment
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)

(Minimum of 60 credits required)

The M.F.A. is currently on suspension and not accepting students.

The Master of Fine Arts program in the School of Communication and Multimedia Studies is an interdisciplinary degree offered in collaboration with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The degree combines film, video, interactive media and computer animation faculty with computer science and engineering faculty to provide graduate students innovative approaches to digital entertainment that stretch creative and scientific boundaries. Students are challenged to think in artistic, scientific and industrial terms about: 1) innovative forms of digital media practice within film and video production, video gaming, web-based interactive media and mobile media; 2) new pipeline models for media production, such as 3D processing for film and game development; 3) practical applications, such as interface design, hardware and software, enhanced content delivery and ubiquitous computing.

The program is intended to prepare students for creative careers in the emerging field of digital media. The related entertainment industries along with the evolving interdisciplinary nature of the arts require a combination of skills from the traditional media of film and television. They also require a deep understanding of the effects of interactivity upon the quality of experience as well as grounding in the computer sciences to understand hardware build, coding, interface design and data delivery within multimedia systems. Therefore, the program emphasizes collaboration across the faculty and programs of Multimedia Studies and Computer Science and Engineering while envisioning expanded cross-disciplinary activities throughout the University. The fundamental philosophy of the program stresses creativity of expression, experimentation and excellence in execution as well as innovation in the field of entertainment technologies and an earnest appreciation of the fine arts.

With these goals in mind, students are able to develop a number of technical proficiencies within 2D and 3D computer animation; interactive, web-based and mobile media; video production and post production; multimedia integration and content delivery. Following a collaborative work model, students are also able to develop specializations within the program while learning to map their technical skill sets onto a broad range of industry settings and using a broad range of visualization strategies.

Admission Requirements

  1.  A baccalaureate degree (B.A., B.F.A. or B.S.) from an accredited institution. Applicants will be drawn from a range of fields and should have an undergraduate degree in computer animation, new media, information technology, media arts, computer science and engineering or a related discipline with a 3.0 GPA.
  2. Competitive Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.
  3. In addition to a completed online application form submitted to the Graduate College, the applicant must submit items 4 through 8 to the degree program office.
  4. A 500-word personal statement. The personal statement should articulate the applicant’s areas of interest and compatibility of those interests with the M.F.A. program. The personal statement is an opportunity for the student to express his or her background and interest in the degree program; the statement will be read by the faculty panel as a measure of creativity, self-awareness and vision.
  5. Writing sample. The writing sample is used to demonstrate the candidate's imagination; the candidate must describe an interactive media experience that has inspired him or her to enter the field, outlining the specific qualities that made the experience meaningful.
  6. Portfolio list. The portfolio list is a record of the applicant’s creative material; it should include a concise description of each project, the month and year of completion, the applicant’s creative role and the purpose of the project. The material should give an idea of the range and depth of the candidate’s creative ability, and formal recognition such as awards, publication, jobs and exhibitions should be noted. When listing creative materials prepared for a class or publication, the name of the institution or the publication should be included.
  7. Creative work sample. The creative work sample is the portfolio that represents the candidate’s best or most relevant work.
  8. Letters of recommendation. A minimum of three letters of recommendation from a variety of sources are required; these may be from teachers and industry supervisors.
  9. International applicants must also meet the additional requirements listed on the Graduate College website.
  10. Applicants must submit all materials listed above no later than March 1 to be considered for fall enrollment. Exceptionally qualified applicants may be considered after that date at the discretion of the graduate faculty.


Degree Requirements

The Master of Fine Arts is an intensive, two-plus year program that requires 60 credits, of which 42 are requirements, 12 are electives and 6 are thesis. As part of the required coursework, students must complete an advanced portfolio or present a creative digital media project that they design and produce on their own or as part of a team.

An overall GPA of at least 3.0 must be maintained in all coursework toward the degree and a minimum grade of 3.0 must be earned in all required courses. There is project work required each semester, and the degree cannot be completed in less than two years of four full-time semesters.

Course Requirements

Core - 39 credits

3D Production for Interactivity

DIG 6547

4

Graduate Media Technology Studio

DIG 6575L

4

Creating Interactive Culture

MMC 6707

4

Portfolio Workshop (may be repeated)

DIG 6589

4

Survey in Digital Media Techniques

DIG 6436

4

Preproduction, Prototyping and Previsualization

DIG 6546

4

Studies in New Media

MMC 6715

4

Experimental Cinema
(may be replaced with alternate production course)

FIL 6409

4

Interactive Interface Design

DIG 6605

4

Master's Thesis - 9 credits

Complete 9 credits from the following options

Master's Thesis
(may be taken over multiple terms)

FIL, JOU, MMC, RTV, SPC 6971

1-6

Electives - 12 credits

Exhibition Practices in Film, Video and New Media

ART 6684

4

Multimedia Systems

CAP 6010

3

Multimedia Programming

CAP 6018

3

Foundations of Vision

CAP 6411

3

Mobile Multimedia

CNT 6515

3

Video Communication

CNT 6885

3

Special Topics

COM 6931

3

Topics in Computer Science
(including Computer Animation, Cutting-Edge Web Technologies, iPhone Programming, Android Programming)

COT 5930

3

Topics in Computer Science
(including Visual Information Retrieval)

COT 6930

3

Video Processing

DIG 6645

3

Film Theory and Criticism

FIL 6807

3

Film History and Historiography

FIL 6026

3

Video Production Workshop

FIL 6365

4

Special Topics

FIL 6931

3

Studies in Film and Television

FIL 6935

3

Special Topics

JOU 6931

3

Special Topics
(including Video Game Studies)

MMC 6931

3

Special Topics

RTV 6931

3

Special Topics

SPC 6931

3

May select additional electives from the College of Engineering and Computer Science.

For more details, visit the program's website. Questions may be directed to Dr. Francis X. McAfee, Program Director, at mcafee@fau.edu.


Comparative Studies

Faculty:  E. Berlatsky, Director; Associated College Faculty

Definition of Comparative Studies
Comparative Studies is the application of various approaches within the humanities, arts and social sciences to the study of significant issues. The Ph.D. in Comparative Studies also involves developing expertise in advanced interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary study: exploration of topics and materials from at least two traditional disciplines (e.g., political science and English literature; anthropology and history; art history, literature and communication). Students select a concentration from the following choices: Culture, Society and Politics; Cultures, Languages and Literatures; Design, Aesthetics and the Arts; Fine and Performing Arts; and Public Intellectuals. The latter two concentrations are on hiatus and currently not accepting students.


Comparative Studies
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Concentrations:
Culture, Society and Politics 

Cultures, Languages and Literatures 
Design, Aesthetics and the Arts 
Fine and Performing Arts 
Public Intellectuals 

Admission Requirements (for all concentrations)

  1. A statement of intent that outlines the applicant's goals and objectives and how this interdisciplinary program can help the applicant achieve these.
  2. A B.A., B.F.A., B.S., M.A., M.S., M.F.A., B.Arch, M.Arch, M.Des or M.M. degree. Students with other undergraduate or graduate degrees, such as M.B.A. or J.D., may also be considered. An applicant must submit a paper, approximately 20 pages in length and with scholarly documentation, that will demonstrate the applicant's analytical and explanatory skills and command of the discipline in the area of the master's degree.
  3. Three descriptive letters of recommendation, including at least two from professors whose course(s) the student has taken. These letters should be current and should attest to the applicant's intellectual qualifications for the Ph.D. in Comparative Studies.
  4. Approval of Ph.D. executive committee.
  5. It is recommended, but not required, that students submit competitive verbal, quantitative and analytic GRE scores from within the last five years.

Application Procedures

  1.  Applications may be obtained from the Graduate College.
  2.  All application materials, including letter of intent, transcripts, three letters of reference and writing sample, should be sent to the Graduate College, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431.
  3. Application deadline for Fall: January 15.


Culture, Society and Politics Concentration
The Culture, Society and Politics concentration of the Ph.D. Program in Comparative Studies is designed to foster interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary study in the social sciences. It is structured to allow students the opportunity to develop deep expertise in one of three primary areas - sociology, anthropology or political science - and to bring their interests and scholarship related to these areas into conversation with other disciplines both within and outside of traditional social science fields. At the heart of the program is a commitment to the belief that comparative models of inquiry lead to unique advancements in the production of new knowledge and a greater awareness of the larger implications of such knowledge generally.

As an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary program, the Comparative Studies: Culture, Society and Politics concentration draws on the strengths of the various departments in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters as well as the broader graduate programs of Florida Atlantic University. Areas of particular strength include: (Anthropology) sociocultural and medical anthropology; bioarchaeology, ethnoarchaeology, zooarchaeology and primatology; (Sociology) studies of gender, agriculture, adulthood, adolescence, childhood, race, social class and economics; (Political Science) comparative politics, American politics, international relations, public policy and law, post-conflict resolution, democracy and democratization, political behavior and quantitative methods.

The program is structured so that students follow a cohesive plan of study that includes both an interdisciplinary social science core and, in close consultation with their advisory committees, the development of two specific areas of specialization that might themselves be multidisciplinary. The program encourages students to address issues in cultures, societies and/or politics from multiple perspectives and to seek the convergence of these perspectives through the insights of interdisciplinary approaches.

This program invites students to explore the interplay among cultures, societies and politics, as well as theories and methodologies, technologies and pedagogies. Toward this end, students are expected to attend Ph.D. Colloquia in addition to their formal coursework. While most graduates of the program will prepare for the challenge of the academy in an increasingly globalized society, others will prepare for a variety of non-academic opportunities, including positions in public and private organizations.

Degree Requirements

  1. Minimum Standards
    Ph.D. students will take a minimum of 48 credits if matriculating with a master's degree or 78 credits if matriculating with a bachelor's degree, 24 of them at the 7000 level. The concentration requires a minimum 36 credits of coursework and 12 dissertation credits. No grade lower than "B" may apply to the degree. To continue in the program, students must maintain a "B" (3.0) grade point average on all work attempted toward the degree.
  2. Distribution Requirements
    For students entering with a bachelor's degree, completion of the following requirements along with all requirements for earning a Master's en Passant degree in their primary field of study (e.g., Anthropology, Communication and Multimedia Studies; Political Science, Sociology) are needed. Students entering with a bachelor's or master's degree are required to complete the following:

    Core - 12 credits

    Theory and Criticism

    CST 7309

    3 credits

    Research Design in Social Science

    CST 7912

    3 credits

    Interdisciplinary Perspectives

    CST 7936

    6 credits

    Electives - 24 credits

    Select 24 credits at the 5000, 6000 or 7000 level, 15 of which must be concentrated in a program in the College of Arts and Letters. No more than 12 of the 24 credits may be at the 5000 level.

    Research and Dissertation - 12 credits (minimum)

    Advanced Research and Study
    (as needed)

    CST 7910

    1-9 credits

    Dissertation 
    (12 credits minimum, may be taken over multiple terms)

    CST 7980

    12 credits

  1. Qualifying Exams
    Students begin the program as a Doctoral Student. After completing 18 credits of coursework in the distribution requirements for the program, students will be required to submit an Application for Qualification, which, if approved, will advance them to the status of Doctoral Scholar. Through the application, the Ph.D. Executive Committee  will review the applicant's current progress to date through the program, their skills as a scholar/researcher and their progress in planning for the Comprehensive Examination. After its review, the committee will make one of two decisions: to advance the student to Doctoral Scholar or to deny advancement. If advancement is denied, the student may choose to reapply one more time the following semester. Failure to be advanced will result in dismissal from the program.
  2. Comprehensive Exams
    Comprehensive Exams consist of a written and oral component. In the semester after completing 32 graduate credits in the program, typically fall of Year 3, the student will take the Written Comprehensive Examination in the eighth week of the semester and the Oral Comprehensive Examination in the tenth week of the semester. The Comprehensive Examinations are administered and evaluated by the student's dissertation committee  (see dissertation section below). In consultation with the student, the committee will compile a reading list from which the exams will be constructed. This list will not be based solely on the student's coursework, but will include as well readings that the exam committee deems foundational for the student's program of study. The successful completion of this written component is followed by the oral exam within two weeks, which examines, beyond the limits of the written exam, the extent of the student's mastery of the material. Students who fail the written exam may retake it one time only. Students who fail the oral exam may retake it one time only. Failure to pass either exam on the second attempt will initiate the dismissal process from the program, consistent with the Provost's policy.
  3. Satisfactory Completion of a Dissertation
    By the end of the second year of coursework, the student will ask a faculty member to serve as the major professor for the dissertation. In consultation with the major professor, the student will ask at least two to three other faculty members to serve on the committee. The student will defend his/her Dissertation Prospectus the semester after passing the comprehensive examinations, typically at the beginning of spring in Year 3. The dissertation will contain original research and will be defended before the student's committee and others.


Cultures, Languages and Literatures Concentration

The Cultures, Languages and Literatures concentration is an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary course of study that enables doctoral students to develop expertise within traditional disciplines and across disciplinary and cultural boundaries. At the heart of the program is the recognition that cultures, languages and literatures are most fruitfully understood through comparative modes of analysis that include an ever-changing landscape of theory and methodologies.

This concentration is both interdisciplinary (the integration of different fields) and multidisciplinary (the comparative analyses of different fields), consistent with the original approved design of the Ph.D. in Comparative Studies. Primary areas of strength for this broadly based program include studies of literature and migration, rhetoric and composition, U.S. multiethnic literatures, early modern literatures, gender, sexuality and embodiment, modernity and postmodernity in literature, space and place in literature, and postcolonial literature and culture. The curriculum also draws from such disciplines as Anthropology, Art History, Communication, History, Peace Studies, Philosophy and Religion, Political Science, Sociology, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, among others.

This program promotes interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary work through a cohesive course of study. All students follow an interdisciplinary core curriculum before developing, in consultation with their advisory committees, areas of specialization which might themselves be multidisciplinary. Students are encouraged to address issues in cultures, languages and literatures from multiple perspectives and to seek the convergence of these perspectives through the insights of interdisciplinary interests.

This program invites students to explore the interplay among cultures, languages and literatures, as well as theories and methodologies, technologies and pedagogies. Toward this end, students will be expected to attend Ph.D. Colloquia in addition to their formal coursework. While most graduates of the program will prepare for the challenge of the academy in an increasingly globalized society, others will prepare for a variety of non-academic opportunities, including positions in public and private organizations.

Degree Requirements

  1.  Minimum Standards
    Ph.D. students will take a minimum of 48 credits if matriculating with a master's degree or 78 credits if matriculating with a bachelor's degree, 24 of them at the 7000 level. The concentration requires a minimum 36 credits of coursework and 12 dissertation credits. No grade lower than "B" may apply to the degree. To continue in the program, students must maintain a "B" (3.0) grade point average on all work attempted toward the degree.
  2. Distribution Requirements
    For students entering with a bachelor's degree, completion of the following requirements along with all requirements for earning a Master's en Passant degree in their primary field of study (e.g., Communication and Multimedia Studies; English; Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature; or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies) are needed. Students entering with a bachelor's or master's degree are required to complete the following:

    Core - 12 credits

     

     

    Theory and Criticism

    CST 7309

    6 credits

    Interdisciplinary Perspectives

    CST 7936

    6 credits

    Electives - 24 credits

    Select 24 credits at the 5000, 6000 or 7000 level, 15 of which must be concentrated in a program in the College of Arts and Letters. No more than 12 of the 24 credits may be at the 5000 level.

    Research and Dissertation - 12 credits (minimum)

    Advanced Research and Study
    (as needed)

    CST 7910

    1-9 credits

    Dissertation 
    (12 credits minimum may be taken over multiple terms)

    CST 7980

    12 credits

  1. Qualifying Exams
    Students begin the program as a Doctoral Student. After completing 18 credits of coursework in the distribution requirements for the program, students will be required to submit an Application for Qualification, which, if approved, will advance them to the status of Doctoral Scholar. Through the application, the Ph.D. Executive Committee will review the applicant's current progress to date through the program, their skills as a scholar/researcher and their progress in planning for the Comprehensive Examination. After its review, the committee will make one of two decisions: to advance the student to Doctoral Scholar or to deny advancement. If advancement is denied, the student may choose to reapply one more time the following semester. Failure to be advanced will result in dismissal from the program.
  2. Comprehensive Exams
    Consist of a written and oral component. In the semester after completing 32 graduate credits in the program, typically fall of year three, the student will take the Written Qualifying Examination in the eighth week of the semester and the Oral Qualifying Examination in the tenth week of the semester. The Qualifying Examinations are administered and evaluated by the student’s dissertation committee (see dissertation section below).

    In consultation with the student, the committee will compile a reading list from which the exams will be constructed. This list will not be based solely on the student’s coursework, but will include as well readings that the exam committee deems foundational for the student’s program of study. The successful completion of this written component is followed by the oral exam within two weeks, which examines, beyond the limits of the written exam, the extent of the student’s mastery of the material.

    Students who fail the written exam may retake it one time only. Students who fail the oral exam may retake it one time only. Failure to pass either exam on the second attempt will initiate the dismissal process from the program, consistent with the Provost’s policy.
  3. Language Requirement
    In a language other than English, the student must demonstrate working knowledge either by passing a written translation exam or by successfully completing (with a grade of "B" or better) a "reading for research" course at the graduate level, which does not count toward the required minimum credits for the Ph.D.
  4. Satisfactory Completion of a Dissertation
    By the end of the second year of course work, the student will ask a faculty member to serve as the major professor for the dissertation. In consultation with the major professor, the student will ask at least two to three other faculty members to serve on the committee. The student will defend his/her Dissertation Prospectus the semester after passing the comprehensive examinations, typically at the beginning of spring in year three. The dissertation will contain original research and will be defended before the student’s committee and others.


Design, Aesthetics and the Arts Concentration

The Design, Aesthetics and the Arts concentration of the Ph.D. Program in Comparative Studies is designed to foster interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary study in the philosophy/theory of aesthetics, design and the fine arts. It is structured to allow students the opportunity to develop deep expertise in these areas, through the disciplines of Philosophy, Design, Architecture, Visual Arts and Art History, Music, Film, Communication and Multimedia Studies, and Theatre, and to bring their interests and scholarship related to these areas into conversation with one another and with other disciplines. At the heart of the program is a commitment to the belief that comparative models of inquiry lead to unique advancements in the production of new knowledge and a greater awareness of the larger implications of such knowledge generally.

As an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary program, the Design, Aesthetics and the Arts concentration draws on the strengths of the various departments and schools in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, as well as the programs of the Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, with whom FAU has a Memo of Understanding (MOU), and the broader graduate programs of Florida Atlantic University.

The program is structured so that students follow a cohesive plan of study that includes both an interdisciplinary core in Design, Aesthetics and the Arts and, in close consultation with their advisory committees, the development of two specific areas of specialization that might themselves be multidisciplinary. The program encourages students to address issues in design, aesthetics and the arts from multiple perspectives and to seek the convergence of these perspectives through the insights of interdisciplinary approaches.

This program invites students to explore the interplay among and within design, aesthetics and fine arts cultures, as well as theories and methodologies and technologies and pedagogies. Toward this end, students are expected to attend Ph.D. Colloquia, when possible and available, in addition to their formal coursework. While many graduates of the program will prepare for the challenge of the academy in an increasingly globalized society, others will prepare for a variety of non-academic opportunities, including positions in public and private organizations, companies or corporations.

Degree Requirements

  1.  Minimum Standards
    Ph.D. students will take a minimum of 48 credits if matriculating with a master's degree or 78 credits if matriculating with a bachelor's degree, 24 of them at the 7000 level. The concentration requires a minimum 36 credits of coursework and 12 dissertation credits. No grade lower than "B" may apply to the degree. To continue in the program, students must maintain a "B" (3.0) grade point average in all work attempted toward the degree.
  2. Distribution Requirements
    For students entering with a bachelor's degree, completion of the following requirements along with all requirements for earning a master's en passant degree in their primary field of study (e.g., Graphic Design, Music, Theatre), are needed. Students entering with a bachelor's or master's degree are required to complete the following courses.

    Core - 12 credits

     

     

    Theory and Criticism

    CST 7309

    6 credits

    Interdisciplinary Perspectives

    CST 7936

    6 credits

    Electives - 24 credits

    Select 24 credits at the 5000, 6000 or 7000 level. No more than 12 of the 24 credits may be at the 5000 level.

    Research and Dissertation - 12 credits (minimum)

    Advanced Research and Study
    (as needed)

    CST 7910

    1-9 credits

    Dissertation 
    (12 credits minimum may be taken over multiple terms)

    CST 7980

    12 credits

  1. Qualifying Exams
    Students begin the program as a doctoral student. After completing 18 credits of coursework in the distribution requirements for the program, students will be required to submit an Application for Qualification, which, if approved, will advance them to the status of Doctoral Scholar. Through the application, the Ph.D. Executive Committee will review the applicant's current progress to date through the program, their skills as a scholar/researcher and their progress in planning for the Comprehensive Examination. After its review, the committee will make one of two decisions: to advance the student to Doctoral Scholar or to deny advancement. If advancement is denied, the student may choose to reapply one more time the following semester. Failure to be advanced will result in dismissal from the program.
  2. Comprehensive Exams
    Comprehensive Exams consist of a written and oral component. In the semester after completing 32 graduate credits in the program, typically fall of Year 3, the student will typically take the Written Comprehensive Examination in the eighth week of the semester and the Oral Comprehensive Examination in the tenth week of the semester. The Comprehensive Examinations are usually administered and evaluated by the student's dissertation committee (see dissertation section below). In consultation with the student, the committee will compile a reading list from which the exams portfolio will be constructed. This list will not be based solely on the student's coursework, but also will include readings that the exam committee deems foundational for the student's program of study. The successful completion of this written component is followed by the oral exam within two weeks, which examines beyond the limits of the written exam, the extent of the student's mastery of the material. Students who fail the written exam may retake it one time only. Students who fail the oral exam may retake it one time only. Failure to pass either exam on the second attempt will initiate the dismissal process from the program, consistent with the Provost's policy.
  3. Satisfactory Completion of a Dissertation
    By the end of the second year of coursework, the student will ask a faculty member to serve as the major professor for the exams and dissertation. In consultation with the major professor, the student will ask at least two to three other faculty members to serve on the committee. The student will defend his/her Dissertation Prospectus the semester after passing the comprehensive examinations, typically at the beginning of spring in Year 3. The dissertation will contain original research and will be defended before the student's committee and others. Because of the unique nature of this program, the dissertation may be traditional scholarship but will more likely be something more innovative. This will comprise theoretical or empirical research, as well as innovative/experimental research.

    The proposed output for such a Ph.D. endeavor will feature:
  1. Strong written element (either proto-monograph, three essays or combination), as well as
  2. Audio-visual, interactive, spatial or performative elements.

    Collaborative Ph.D. work will be allowed in special cases (with academic peers, unique professionals or high-profile experts, as deemed appropriate by Ph.D. committee).


Fine and Performing Arts Concentration

This program is on hiatus and currently not accepting students.

The Fine and Performing Arts concentration in Comparative Studies provides a breadth of training and experience across the traditional divisions of the arts for those who already have developed professional skills in one or more areas, such as dance, music, theatre and/or the visual arts. The concentration offers a balance between a series of core courses and an individually prescribed curriculum. Analytical studies cover fundamental research resources and techniques as well as current theoretical trends in each discipline. Creative studies offer the opportunity to explore the ways in which each discipline expresses specific themes as well as the potential for creative communication through the integration of two or more of the arts. A course in the fundamental concepts and history of aesthetic theory is also a requirement for all students.

The goal of the program is to enable students to be conversant in the arts as a whole. To this end, all students are required to take traditional seminars in areas outside their chosen discipline. Over half the courses required for completion of the degree, however, are to be chosen by the student from among the offerings in Comparative Studies and other departmental listings with the guidance of an advisor and the approval of the Ph.D. committee. Comprehensive examinations are required for candidacy. Upon acceptance, a dissertation on a topic involving both analytical and creative aspects will allow students to develop a base of knowledge and a degree of flexibility useful both in the traditional and in the increasingly interdisciplinary academic world of the arts.

Curriculum
The curriculum for the concentration in Fine and Performing Arts in Comparative Studies is organized as follows:

  1. Five required core courses;
  2.  24-27 credits of courses that address the primary, secondary and comparative areas of focus;
  3. 12-15 credits of dissertation.

Grading
The program's procedures for grading are as follows: "A," "A-": expected progress; "B+": improvement needed; "B": lowest passing grade.

Admission Requirements
The following admission requirements are in addition to the admission requirements found at the beginning of this Comparative Studies section:

  1. Four credits of or demonstration of an intermediate-level proficiency of one foreign language (may be met during Ph.D. study and must be met before admission to candidacy).
  2. A portfolio, dossier or audition as specified by the School of the Arts, if appropriate.
  3. A copy of the student's application to the Graduate College. Students should be aware that the Graduate College outlines its own set of admission requirements in addition to this program's admission requirements.
  4. Résumé.

Degree Requirements

  1. Minimum Standards
    Ph.D. students will take a minimum of 54 credits in courses in three areas: required core courses in comparative arts and aesthetics; seminars offered in music, theatre and the visual arts; and electives related to their area of focus. No grade lower than "B" may apply to the degree. To continue in the program, students must maintain a "B" (3.0) grade point average on all work attempted toward the degree.
  2. Distribution Requirements

    Analytical and Creative Studies in the Arts

    Aesthetics and Philosophy of the Arts

    6 credits

    Music Core: Concepts, Culture and Creation

    Theatre Core: Performance Theory and Practice

    Art Core: A Thematic Study

    9 credits

    Studies in comparative, major or secondary areas (including at least 6 credits from the arts component of the Public Intellectuals program)

    27 credits

    Dissertation

    12 credits

  1. Comprehensive Exams
    Upon completion of coursework, the student takes a sequence of comprehensive exams: a written exam followed by an oral exam. Upon successful completion, the student qualifies to advance to candidacy.
  2. Language/Research
    The student must demonstrate working knowledge of a language other than English by successfully completing (with a grade of "B" or better) 4 credits, at the intermediate level or its equivalent, of one foreign language at the university level.
  3. Satisfactory Completion of a Dissertation


Public Intellectuals Concentration

This program is on hiatus and currently not accepting students.

The Public Intellectuals concentration is an interdisciplinary program for students interested in advanced study and life as a public intellectual. While "public intellectual" often connotes a famous name, public intellectuals also include journalists, artists, architects, legislators, clergy, museum curators, environmental planners, community organizers, as well as teachers and scholars whose work defines, shapes and influences public issues.

The program explores historical, conceptual and practical relationships among such areas as public policy, mass media, literature, aesthetics, ethics, gender studies, culture and rhetoric. Its goal is to combine theoretical with concrete analysis and to strive for this integration in every core course, producing students who are theoretically confident and knowledgeable about the world they hope to understand and change.

Curriculum
The curriculum for the Public Intellectuals concentration in Comparative Studies is organized as follows:

  1.  Two semester-long required core courses;
  2.  Two courses in public intellectual theory and method;
  3. A minimum of three courses in the student's concentration;
  4. 15 credits in electives. These can be chosen from Comparative Studies courses or from other graduate programs in the University. A practicum, if undertaken, will count as elective credit, and the student's advisory committee will determine the degree of credit. Students undertaking a practicum before the completion of the program core courses and/or before establishing an advisory committee must have the practicum approved and credits established by the Ph.D. executive committee.

Public Intellectuals Program Paths of Study
In addition to paths of study listed below, students may petition to design their own focus with the approval of the Public Intellectuals executive committee.

  1. Global and Local: Movements and Transformations
  2. Art, Literature and Culture(s)
  3.  Feminism, Gender and Sexuality
  4.  Technology, Environment and Society
  5.  Media and Communication
  6. Peace Studies

Degree Requirements

  1.  Minimum Standards
    A Ph.D. student will take a minimum of 51 credits in courses in three areas: required core courses in Comparative Studies; the three 7000-level Comparative Studies courses that are the student's path of study; and electives from 7000-level courses or 6000-level courses within other departments and programs. No grade lower than "B" may apply to the degree. To continue in the program, students must maintain a "B" (3.0) grade point average on all work attempted toward the degree.
  2. Distribution Requirements

    Required Core Courses

    6 credits

    Public Intellectual Theory and Method Courses

    6 credits

    Student's Major Concentration

    9 credits

    Electives

    15 credits

    Advanced Research and Study

    3 credits

    Dissertation

    12 credits

  1. Public Matters Core Course Sequence
    Students admitted to the program may take no more than 6 credits before registering in the core course sequence. Students who do not complete each course with a passing grade must retake and pass the course at its next offering in order to remain in good standing.
  2. Qualifying Exams
    Students begin the program as a Doctoral Student. After completing 18 credits of coursework in the distribution requirements for the program, students will be required to submit an Application for Qualification, which, if approved,will advance them to the status of Doctoral Scholar. Through the application, the Ph.D. Executive Committee  will review the applicant's current progress to date through the program, their skills as a scholar/researcher and their progress in planning for the Comprehensive Examination. After its review, the committee will make one of two decisions: to advance the student to Doctoral Scholar or to deny advancement. If advancement is denied, the student may choose to reapply one more time the following semester. Failure to be advanced will result in dismissal from the program.
  3. Comprehensive Exams
    Upon completion of coursework, the student takes a sequence of comprehensive exams: a written exam followed by an oral exam. Upon successful completion, the student qualifies to advance to candidacy.

    The second exam is taken upon completion of the student's other coursework and is administered and evaluated by the student's advisory committee. The second exam is based on a dissertation proposal and a bibliography developed by the student and approved by the student's advisory committee.

    Students who fail an exam may retake it one time only.
  4. Language/Research Tools Requirement
    Proficiency is required in the use of two research tools. At least one of these tools must be a language other than English demonstrating an intermediate level of proficiency. The other tool, if not a language, should be the demonstration of a skill relevant to life as a public intellectual, e.g., planning and organizing a public issue conference, publishing a substantial critical essay or journalistic work in a public venue, or developing a media production or live performance. This skill must be approved by the program director.
  5. Satisfactory Completion of a Dissertation


English

Faculty:
Buckton, O., Chair; Adams, R.; Balkan, S.; Barrios, B.; Berlatsky, E.; Blakemore, S., Emeritus; Bucak, P.; Chenovick, C.; Dagbovie-Mullins, S.; Fox, R.; Furman, A.; Galin, J.; Hagood, T.; Hinshaw, W.; Klein, S.;  Lettman, S.; Low, J., Emeritus; MacDonald, I.; Mason, J.; McGuirk, C., Emeritus; McKay, B.; Medina, D.; Miller, T.; Mitchell, S.; Murtaugh, D., Emeritus; Schwartz, J.; Scroggins, M., Emeritus; Stockard, E.; Taylor, T. J.; Thomas, C.; Ulin, J.; Vado, K.

Instructors:
Amadori, C.; Blount, J..; Cassanetti, N.; Cervone, S.; Chasteen, N.; Cohen, J.; Criscuolo, M.;  Fedden, V.; Fox, P.; Frost, T.; Gifford, S.; Gothard, A.; Jones, S; Henson, J.;  Kelly, W.; Kiley, E.; Miller, D.; Mullen, J.; Osborne-Parker, T.; Polak, K.; Potter, R.; Redman, F.; Rooney, S.; Salisbury, L.; Trewick, L.; Trotter, D.; Wedding, C.; White, J.; Zvolensky, J.

Link to Master's Programs


English
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Professional and Creative Writing Concentration

(Minimum of 120 credits required)

English majors develop advanced skills in writing and critical interpretation that are valued by employers in a number of fields. They have established careers in law, medicine, entertainment, communications, information technology, journalism, speech writing, government, publishing and teaching.

All English majors acquire a broad background in literature in English taking courses that stress literary history, literary genres and the achievements of individual authors. Depending upon their particular interests, majors may also pursue a concentration in Professional and Creative Writing. The Professional and Creative Writing concentration includes courses in both creative writing and rhetoric/composition. Creative writing courses focus on the writing of poetry, fiction and non-fiction. Rhetoric and composition courses focus on the professional, analytical, academic and theoretical dimensions of writing. 

Qualified undergraduate majors may apply to the Honors Program in English or Honors Program in Creative Writing. An English Internship Program and Secondary Education Program are also available.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the General Education Program) and requirements for the College and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transition Guides .

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
All courses listed below have as a prerequisite the successful completion of the English Composition sequence (ENC 1101 and ENC 1102, or their equivalents, with minimum grade of "C"). Grades in all courses taken in the major must average "C" or 2.0 or higher, and no course with a grade of "D+" or below will count toward the major. Students whose grades in major courses average below a "C" or 2.0 will not be able to graduate with an English major. Except where noted, courses cannot be counted twice. With these conditions being met, completion of the English major will require 39 credits drawn from the following:

English Undergraduate Curriculum (39 credits)
(Courses cannot be counted twice.)

Introduction to Literary Studies

ENG 3822

3

(It is strongly recommended that students take this course concurrently with or before their first upper-division English course. English majors should not take any more than three upper-division courses before taking ENG 3822.)

Criticism

3

Literary Theory

LIT 3213

3

Philosophy of Literature

PHI 3882

3

Literature*

(At least two courses must pay significant attention to literature before 1800. These courses are marked by * below. No more than 6 credits at the 2000 level.)

Category 1: Literature of Ethnicity, Gender and Culture

6

Florida Women Writers

AML 3264

3

Florida Writers

AML 3265

3

African-American Literature to 1895

AML 4604

3

African-American Literature 1895 to Present

AML 4607

3

U.S. Latino/a Literatures

AML 4630

3

American-Indian Literature

AML 4640

3

Jewish-American Literature

AML 4663

3

Asian-American Literatures

AML 4673

3

Irish Literature

LIT 3184

3

Comparative Literature

LIT 4061

3

Caribbean Literatures in English

LIT 4192

3

World Literature: Critical Approaches

LIT 4225

3

Postcolonial Literature

LIT 4233

3

Major Writers of World Literature in English

LIT 4244

3

Black Literatures

LIT 4355

3

Women and Literature

LIT 4383

3

Comparative European Romanticism

LIT 4604

3

Directed Independent Research

LIT 4915

1-3

Directed Independent Research

LIT 4916

0-3

AML 4930, ENG 4932, ENL 4930 and LIT 4930 are Special Topics courses and may also count for this category if approved by the department.

Category 2: American and British Literature & Specialized Subjects and Genre Studies

15

American Literature to 1865

AML 2010

3

American Literature from 1865

AML 2020

3

American Novel: 19th Century

AML 3111

3

American Novel: 20th Century

AML 3121

3

Literature of the South

AML 3263

3

Colonial and Early American Literature

AML 4213

3

American Literature: 19th-Century Traditions

AML 4223

3

American Literature: 20th-Century Movements

AML 4242

3

Major American Writers: 19th Century

AML 4311

3

Major American Writers: 20th Century

AML 4321

3

Directed Independent Research

AML 4915

1-3

Directed Independent Research

AML 4916

0-3

Literature and Film

ENG 4114

3

British Literature to 1798

ENL 2012

3

British Literature since 1798

ENL 2022

3

British Novel: 18th Century*

ENL 3112

3

British Novel: 19th Century

ENL 3122

3

British Novel: 20th Century

ENL 3132

3

Backgrounds for British and American Literature

ENL 3425

3

Medieval Literature*

ENL 4210

3

Renaissance Literature*

ENL 4220

3

17th-Century Literature*

ENL 4221

3

18th-Century Literature*

ENL 4230

3

British Romanticism

ENL 4243

3

Victorian Literature

ENL 4251

3

Victorian Genres and Themes

ENL 4264

3

20th-Century British Literature

ENL 4273

3

Chaucer*

ENL 4311

3

Shakespeare*

ENL 4333

3

Milton*

ENL 4341

3

Directed Independent Research

ENL 4915

1-3

Directed Independent Research

ENL 4916

0-3

Modern Drama

LIT 3043

3

Fantasy Literature

LIT 3312

3

Science Fiction

LIT 3313

3

Literature of Adolescence

LIT 3333

3

Detective Fiction

LIT 3344

3

Literary Genres

LIT 4001

3

Modern Poetry

LIT 4032

3

Contemporary Drama

LIT 4094

3

Literature and Environment

LIT 4434

3

Literature and Social Movements

LIT 4484

3

Literature of War

LIT 4605

3

AML 4930, ENG 4932, ENL 4930 and LIT 4930 are Special Topics courses and may also count for this category if approved by the department.

Category 3: Writing and Rhetoric

3

Advanced Exposition

ENC 3310

3

Professional Writing

ENC 3213

3

Principles of Research Writing

ENC 4138

3

Writing for Nonprofits

ENC 4354

3

Special Topics

ENC 4930

3

Directed Independent Research

ENC 4915

1-3

Directed Independent Research

ENC 4916

0-3

Studies in Writing and Rhetoric

ENG 4020

3

Creative Writing

CRW 3010

3

Fiction Workshop 1

CRW 4120

3

Fiction Workshop 2

CRW 4121

3

Creative Writing: Non-Fiction Writing

CRW 4211

3

Poetic Forms

CRW 4311

3

Poetry Workshop 1

CRW 4310

3

Poetry Workshop 2

CRW 4321

3

Literary Editing and Publishing

CRW 4723

3

Special Topics

CRW 4930

3

Honors Creative Writing Seminar

CRW 4932

3

Structure of Modern English

LIN 4680

3

Category 4: Courses that may be taken from another department in Arts and Letters. Please see advisor for these courses.

Electives at 3000 level and above (9 credits)
Students must complete an additional 9 credits, choosing courses from Categories 1-4. All must be earned at the 3000 or 4000 level. With departmental approval, 3 credits may be taken from another department in the College of Arts and Letters, provided the course has an English disciplinary focus (e.g., SPT 4130, Latin American Literature in Translation). The department offers an internship, ENG 4940, a 1-6 credit course that also counts toward electives.

Optional Area of Concentration in Professional and Creative Writing 
Students interested in pursuing more specialized study in writing may wish to complete the Professional and Creative Writing concentration. While all B.A. English students are required to take 39 credits of introductory courses, courses in categories 1, 2, and 3, and electives, the distribution of credits required for the Professional and Creative Writing concentration emphasizes additional study and practice of various forms of composition.

English Undergraduate Curriculum with Professional and Creative Writing Concentration - 39 credits
(Courses cannot be counted twice.)

Creative Writing CRW 3013 3
Professional Writing ENC 3213 3
Literary Theory/Criticism   3
Introduction to Literary Studies ENG 3822 3
Literary Theory LIT 3213 3
Category 1: Literature of Ethnicity, Gender and Culture (courses as offfered above) 6
Category 2: American and British Literature, Specialized Subjects and Genre Studies (courses as offered above) 6
Category 3: Writing and Rhetoric (Courses as offered above. Students must choose 6 credits of Category 3 CRW courses and 6 credits of Category 3 ENC/ENG/LIT courses) 12
Electives 6
Total 39


Electives at 3000 level and above (6 credits)
Students must complete an additional 6 credits, choosing courses from Categories 1-4. All must be earned at the 3000 or 4000 level. With departmental approval, 3 credits may be taken from another department in the College of Arts and Letters, provided the course has an English disciplinary focus (e.g., SPT 4130, Latin American Literature in Translation). The department offers an internship, ENG 4940, a 1-6 credit course that
also counts toward electives.


Honors Program in English

The Honors Program in English provides the opportunity for qualified majors to undertake advanced literary research in a community of their undergraduate peers. This program is especially recommended for students who plan to pursue a graduate degree in literary studies.

Eligibility Requirements

  1. Minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and a GPA of 3.5 or above in English major courses;
  2. Completion of 60 credits, including at least 15 upper-division English major credits;
  3. Completion of ENG 3822, Introduction to Literary Studies, or LIT 3212, Literary Theory (or, may petition to take either concurrently with the Honors Seminar).

Application Requirements

  1.  A copy of the student's (unofficial) current transcript highlighting all English major courses;
  2. A one-to-two page statement of purpose detailing why the student is applying to the Honors Program and describing the possible focus of the student's honors thesis;
  3. A copy of a critical essay the student wrote for an English class that exemplifies the student's best work (no more than 10 pages). Please include the course name and instructor.

Program Requirements
The English Honors Program entails taking two related courses (3 credits each) in the fall and spring and completing an honors thesis between 20-40 pages.

  1. Honors Seminar, ENG 4932: Required for honors students but open to those interested in more advanced literary study. Allows students to synthesize the literary knowledge and critical skills gained in the English major. More intensive and interactive than the department’s other courses and organized in ways that anticipate graduate-level courses. Topics of the seminar change from year to year. Offered once a year in the fall.
  2.  RI: Honors Research, ENG 4910: Facilitates the writing of the honors thesis, the final aim of the course. Exposes students to the standards and best practices of research-level literary scholarship while also preparing the ground for the students’ intended research topics. May include library research visits, presentations on different research and analytical methodologies and peer editing workshops. At the end of spring semester, students will present their theses at an Honors Research course event or the Undergraduate Research Symposium. Offered once a year in the spring.

Students will receive the designation “Honors in English” at the time of graduation upon satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

  1. Fulfillment of all normal field distribution requirements for the English major;
  2.  Completion, with a grade of "B" or higher, of Honors Seminar and Honors Research;
  3. Achievement of an overall GPA of at least 3.0 and a GPA of at least 3.5 in all English courses at the time of graduation;
  4.  Completion of a thesis of substance and quality that meets with the approval of the course instructor and/or thesis chair.

Students in the Honors Program in English who complete all requirements, but do not meet the GPA requirements for honors at the time of graduation, will receive credit for all work completed, but will not be certified as having received honors. Students who engage in academic dishonesty will be dismissed from the Honors Program and face additional penalties from the University.

For more information, contact Dr. Julieann Ulin at julin@fau.edu.


Honors Program in Creative Writing

Eligibility Requirements

  1. Completion of at least 60 credits toward degree;
  2. Successful completion of CRW 3010 (Creative Writing) and at least two 4000-level creative writing workshops. At least one of these workshops must be in the genre (poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction) for which the student is applying;
  3. Minimum overall GPA of 3.0 with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in English major courses.

Note: Students who do not meet the GPA requirements or who have not taken a second 4000-level workshop may apply for the course and may be admitted to the program if their applications are considered strong enough. However, in order to receive the honors designation upon graduation, students must meet the GPA requirements.

Application Requirements

  1. A writing sample in the genre in which the student is applying (student's thesis will be written in that genre). For prose (fiction or creative nonfiction), please submit a minimum of 10 pages. For poetry, a minimum of 6 poems (each poem must start on a new page);
  2.  A brief (200-250 words) statement of intent explaining the student's interest in the program and what the student hopes to achieve in the program, with a cover sheet attached;
  3.  A copy of the student's (unofficial) current transcript with all English major courses highlighted.

Program Requirements
The Honors Program in Creative Writing entails completion of the Honors Creative Writing Seminar, CRW 4932: This course provides a structured framework for students in the Honors Creative Writing Program to complete their honors thesis (either a work of fiction, nonfiction or a collection of poetry). Provides information about post-graduate opportunities for creative writers. Examines works of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction in more depth and with more of an eye toward craft than may have been possible in previous coursework.

Note: Students will receive the designation “Honors in Creative Writing” at the time of graduation upon satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

  1.  Fulfillment of all normal field distribution requirements for the English major;
  2. Completion of the Honors Creative Writing Seminar with a grade of “B” or higher, which includes the completion of a thesis of substance and quality that meets with the approval of the course instructor and a second faculty reader (assigned by the Department of English);
  3.  Achievement of an overall GPA of at least 3.0 and a GPA of at least 3.5 in all English courses at the time of graduation.

Students in the Honors Program in Creative Writing who complete all requirements, but do not meet the GPA requirements for honors at the time of graduation, will receive credit for all work completed, but will not be certified as having received honors. Students who engage in academic dishonesty will be dismissed from the Honors Program and face additional penalties from the University.

For more information, contact Dr. Becka McKay at rmckay3@fau.edu.

English
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 15 credits required)

Students majoring in any discipline other than English are eligible to minor in English. The minor encourages breadth of knowledge in literary studies and offers experience in critical analysis. Fifteen credits in English courses must be completed. Four out of five of these classes must be taken at Florida Atlantic University, and at least four out of the five classes must be taken in the English Department. If a course is taken outside of the English Department, it must be approved by the department and have a literary studies focus. English Education majors should note that no more than one course can count toward both the major and the English minor.

Course requirements (15 credits)

Introduction to Literary Studies
(recommended) 

ENG 3822

3 or

Literary Theory

LIT 3213

3

One of the following four 2000-level survey courses:

American Literature to 1865

AML 2010

3

American Literature from 1865

AML 2020

3

British Literature to 1798

ENL 2012

3

British Literature since 1798

ENL 2022

3

One course from Category 1 
(See tables in
Bachelor of Arts with Major in English above.)

3

Two upper-division courses, excluding ENC 3213
(See tables in Bachelor of Arts with Major in English above.)

6

English Internship Program
Internships are extremely important for students pursuing careers related to English studies. The Department of English has developed a diverse internship program that allows students to gain hands-on experience in a wide variety of settings.

The internship program is highly selective, not just in terms of academics, but also in terms of drive, hunger, and innovation. Internship agencies capture FAU’s best talent, and many of the internships have become full-time paid positions for FAU students.

Eligibility Requirements

  1. The student must be an English major at Florida Atlantic University.
  2.  The student must be of junior or senior standing.
  3.  The student must be residing in Florida and available for frequent on-campus meetings at the university.
  4. The student must have no less than a 3.0 overall grade point average AND a 3.0 in the English major.
  5. The student must obtain and submit one letter of recommendation from an FAU English Department faculty member from whom s/he has taken a course. The recommendation should be emailed from the faculty member directly to the internship director.

Note: Some of the internship agencies require a cover letter and writing samples. 

Secondary Education Program
A program leading to teacher certification in English is available through the Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education.


Master's Programs

A program of study toward each degree will be designed upon beginning work toward the degree, and all work counting toward the degree must receive departmental approval beforehand. Courses may be allowed from other disciplines or departments when determined to be purposeful in the student’s curriculum. The credits that the University allows as transfer from other institutions will be considered by the same criteria if they are to count as part of the coursework for the degree. Unless such exceptions are made, all work will be chosen from Department of English, the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters offerings. No course with a grade below “B-” (2.67) will count toward the degree. A minimum GPA of 3.0 must be maintained for graduation.

Assistantships
Graduate assistantships are awarded yearly on a competitive basis, selection being made in early spring for the following fall. Duties include teaching, tutoring and/or research assistance. The award is for one year (two semesters), with the possibility of being recommended for renewal in a second year. Assistantship awards require students to be registered for 9 credits and include a stipend and a full tuition waiver, though students remain responsible for fees. To view our full cost of attendance information page, visit https://www.fau.edu/finaid/other/cost-of-attendance/. Since the department awards assistantships as both an opportunity to gain teaching experience and a means to progress steadily toward completion of the degree, other job commitments while holding the assistantship are discouraged.

Link to M.F.A. in Creative Writing


English
Master of Arts (M.A.)

Rhetoric and Composition Concentration
Science Fiction and Fantasy Concentration

(Minimum of 30 credits required)

Admission Requirements
Admission to the program requires a minimum 3.0 grade point average in the last 60 credits of undergraduate work and a submitted copy of competitive GRE scores. In addition to coursework and test scores, the following are required: a writing sample (a scholarly paper for the literature program; creative work for the Creative Writing concentration), a statement of purpose (3-4 pages) outlining preparation for graduate study and two letters of recommendation.

The writing sample, statement of purpose, letters of recommendation and copies of the application form, official transcripts and GRE scores should be sent directly to the Graduate College. The deadline for M.A. applicants for summer and fall is January 15; for spring it is November 1. The deadline for Creative Writing M.F.A. applicants is January 15. The original application form as well as official transcripts and GRE scores should be sent to the Graduate College.

Applicants who do not have a bachelor's degree in English may be required to complete additional coursework in the field before beginning work that counts toward the master's degree.

Program Requirements
Minimum of 30 credits: The program requires 24 credits of graduate coursework and 6 credits of thesis or comprehensive exam.

General Degree Requirements

  1. Research Methods for Advanced Literary Study (ENG 6009), required during the first term of graduate study or as soon thereafter as possible.
  2.  Literary Criticism 1 or 2 (ENG 5018 or 5019).
  3. Thesis or comprehensive exam (6 credits).

Language Requirements 
Graduate students in the English M.A. program are required to demonstrate an ability to think about the workings of language through formal study, historical research or proficiency equivalent to a year of study. Students can fulfill this requirement in the following ways: 

  1. LIN 6107: History of the English Language. Students who opt to take LIN 6107 as their language requirement may also count this course toward their degree. 
  2. Two semesters of college-level coursework of a language other than English. 
  3. Readings for Research (FRE/GER/SPN 5060) offered by FAU's Department of Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature or an approved equivalent outside course. 
  4. Passing a Foreign Language Achievement Test (FLATS) or College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) to demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language. 

Historical Degree Requirements

  1. One Medieval and/or Early Modern (pre-1699) course.
  2. One 18th and/or 19th century (1700-1899) course.
  3. One 20th and/or 21st century (1900-present) course.

Areas of Concentration
The department offers two concentrations for students who would like to specialize in Rhetoric and Composition or Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Rhetoric and Composition Concentration 
In addition to the two required courses and three historical coverage requirements identified under the headings of General and Historical Degree Requirements, the student will plan, under advisement, a program in Rhetoric and Composition including three courses in the area of  specialization. The concentration culminates in a thesis or comprehensive exam within the area of specialization.

Science Fiction and Fantasy Concentration 
In addition to the two required courses and three historical coverage requirements identified under the headings of General and Historical Degree Requirements, the student will plan, under advisement, a program in Science Fiction and Fantasy including three courses in the area of  specialization (one or more of these courses will also fulfill the period-specific requirements). The concentration culminates in a thesis or comprehensive exam within the area of specialization.

Core - 6 credits 

Literary Criticism 1

ENG 5018 

3 or 

Literary Criticism 2

ENG 5019

3

Research Methods for Advanced Literary Study

ENG 6009

3

Electives - 18 credits

Select credits at the 5000 or 6000 level with the prefix of AML, ENC, ENG, ENL or LIT. Must include the 9 credits of required Historical courses (pre-1700, 1700-1900, 1900-present) noted above in Historical Degree Requirements.

Thesis or Exam

6

Master's Thesis
(may be taken over two terms)

AML / ENC / ENG / ENL / LIT 6971

6 or

Reading for Comprehensive Exams
(may be taken over two terms)

LIT 6900

1-6

Rhetoric and Composition Concentration

Must complete 9 credits at the 5000 or 6000 level with course prefix of ENC. These 9 credits cannot include Master's Thesis (XXX 6971).

Science Fiction and Fantasy Concentration

Must complete 9 credits of Science Fiction and Fantasy coursework at the 5000 or 6000 level from the Department of English. This coursework can meet historical requirements. Coursework cannot include Master's Thesis (XXX 6971) or Reading for Comprehensive Exams (LIT 6900).

Creative Writing
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)

(Minimum of 48 credits required)

Program Requirements
The program requires 42 credits of graduate coursework and 6 credits of thesis.

The student selects, under advisement, seven courses in creative writing (typically workshops), six courses from the areas of literature, theory and rhetoric, and ENG 6009, Research Methods for Advanced Literary Study. Creative writing courses include the following, and can be repeated for credit: CRW 5025, Creative Writing Workshop; CRW 6024, Creative Writing: Genre and Form; CRW 6130, Workshop: Fiction Writing; CRW 6236, Creative Non-Fiction Workshop; CRW 6331, Workshop: Poetry Writing. This program does not have a language requirement.

Core - 3 credits

Research Methods for Advanced Literary Study

ENG 6009

3

Select 21 credits from the following courses

Creative Writing Workshop (may be repeated)

CRW 5025

3

Creative Writing: Genre and Form (may be repeated)

CRW 6024

3

Workshop: Fiction Writing (may be repeated)

CRW 6130

3

Creative Non-Fiction Writing (may be repeated)

CRW 6236

3

Workshop: Poetry Writing (may be repeated)

CRW 6331

3

Electives - 18 credits

Select 6 courses (18 credits) at the 5000 or 6000 level from the Department of English, excluding CRW 5025, 6024, 6130, 6236, 6331

Thesis - 6 credits

 

 

Master's Thesis (may be completed over two terms)

CRW 6971

1-6


History

Faculty:
Kanter, D., Chair; Bennett, E.; Cunningham, C.; Dalin, M.; Dunlea, C.; Engle, S.; Finucane, A.; Ganson, B.; Hanne, E.; Holloway, K.; Kollander, P.; Lowe, B., McGetchin, D.; Mitton, S.; Norman, S.; Rose, M.; Scott, J.; Shannon, K.; Sharples, J.; Weinberg, E.

History majors use the study of the past to make sense of a complicated world. Developing insights into past human experiences prepares students for a wide variety of fields, including law, teaching, public history, business, government, communication and even medicine. Professions and professional schools in today's world look for applicants who have broad interests and backgrounds and analytical and verbal skills rather than narrow field specialization. History is a flexible and broad discipline and majors learn how to think critically, evaluate evidence and write with clarity and strength. Students interested in the Bachelor of Arts degree may pursue the traditional major or the major and one concentration. Concentrations available include Africana History, British History, Legal History and Religious History as detailed below. An undergraduate Honors Program in History program and a minor in History are also available. Two combined programs are offered, which allow students to earn a bachelor's and master's degree in as little as five years. In the graduate area, the department offers a Master of Arts degree.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the General Education Program) and requirements for the College and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the  Transition Guides .

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Link to Combined B.A./M.A. Programs

Link to Master's Program


History

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Africana History Concentration
British History Concentration
Legal History Concentration
Religious History Concentration

(Minimum of 120 credits required)

In addition to other requirements as stipulated by the University and the College, the student pursuing a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History will be required to complete a minimum of 42 credits, including two 3-credit survey courses in World history (WOH) and U.S. history (AMH) (e.g., either WOH 2012 or WOH 2022 and either AMH 2010 or AMH 2020), a course in historical methods (HIS 3150) and senior seminar (HIS 4935) selected from courses listed in the tables below.

Basic Courses (12 credits)

One of the following WOH courses

History of Civilization 1

WOH 2012

or

History of Civilization 2

WOH 2022

3

One of the following AMH courses

U.S. History to 1877

AMH 2010

or

U.S. History since 1877

AMH 2020

3

Both of the following capstone courses

RI: Historical Methods

HIS 3150*

3

RI: Senior Seminar

HIS 4935

3

* History majors are required to take HIS 3150 before completing 90 credits toward graduation. HIS 3150 is also a prerequisite for HIS 4935.

The remaining coursework must include a minimum of 30 credits of 3000-level-or-above courses, including:

United States History (6 credits)

American Capitalism since 1890

AMH 3371

3

History of American Technology

AMH 3372

3

The American South

AMH 3400

3

History of Florida

AMH 3420

3

Work and Workers in U.S. History

AMH 3500

3

History of American Immigration and Ethnicity

AMH 3530

3

U.S. Constitutional History

AMH 3550

3

History of U.S. Women

AMH 3560

3

African-American History to 1877

AMH 3571

3

African-American History since 1877

AMH 3572

3

American Environmental History

AMH 3630

3

Colonial North America

AMH 4110

3

The American Revolution

AMH 4133

3

The Age of Jefferson and Jackson

AMH 4150

3

Civil War and Reconstruction

AMH 4170

3

The U.S. in the Era of World War I and World War II

AMH 4231

3

U.S. since 1945

AMH 4270

3

America in the 1960s

AMH 4273

3

American Material Culture to 1860

AMH 4302

3

American Material Culture from 1860

AMH 4303

3

History of U.S. Drug and Alcohol Use

AMH 4315

3

American Politics since 1750

AMH 4350

3

Shopping, Travel and Leisure

AMH 4377

3

Urban History of the United States

AMH 4460

3

Diplomatic History of the U.S.

AMH 4512

3

Law in U.S. History

AMH 4558

3

History of African-American Women

AMH 4574

3

The Civil Rights Movement

AMH 4575

3

American Sports History

AMH 4611

3

Religion in America

AMH 4620

3

America and the Sea

AMH 4694

3

Special Topics in American History

AMH 4930

3

European History (6 credits)

20th-Century Europe since World War II

EUH 3206

3

Modern Eastern Europe

EUH 3320

3

20th-Century Europe to World War II

EUH 3343

3

History of Modern France

EUH 3451

3

History of Modern Germany

EUH 3462

3

History of Modern Russia

EUH 3570

3

Women in European History

EUH 3619

3

Medieval History

EUH 4120

3

Renaissance Europe (1350–1500)

EUH 4140

3

Reformation Europe (1500–1650)

EUH 4144

3

Early Modern Europe (1650–1789)

EUH 4200

3

19th-Century Europe

EUH 4233

3

History of Greek Civilization

EUH 4403

3

History of Roman Civilization

EUH 4411

3

Hitler and Nazi Germany

EUH 4465

3

Medieval England

EUH 4500

3

Modern Britain

EUH 4502

3

Tudor-Stuart England

EUH 4511

3

British Empire

EUH 4530

3

Modern Ireland

EUH 4538

3

History of European Sexuality

EUH 4684

3

Special Topics in European History

EUH 4930

3

Latin American History (6 credits)

Colonial Latin American History

LAH 3100

3

Latin American Independence

LAH 3133

3

Modern Latin American History

LAH 3200

3

Women in Latin American History

LAH 3721

3

Indians in Latin American History

LAH 4131

3

History of Mexico

LAH 4430

3

History of the Caribbean

LAH 4470

3

History of Cuba

LAH 4480

3

Special Topics in Latin American History

LAH 4930

3

World History (6 credits)

History of African Diaspora

AFH 3512

3

Special Topics in African History

AFH 4930

3

Islamic History

ASH 3222

3

Modern Middle East

ASH 3223

3

The Ottoman Empire

ASH 3233

3

History of East Asia

ASH 3300

3

Women in Asian History

ASH 3384

3

The Crusades

ASH 4210

3

Modern Iran

ASH 4242

3

History of Modern China

ASH 4404

3

History of Modern Japan

ASH 4442

3

History of Modern India

ASH 4550

3

Indian Civilization

ASH 4560

3

History of Eastern Ideas

ASH 4600

3

History of Chinese Thought

ASH 4602

3

Zen and Buddhism

ASH 4603

3

Islamic Intellectual History

ASH 4624

3

Asia and the West

ASH 4630

3

Special Topics in Asian History

ASH 4930

3

History Electives (6 credits; may be taken from the above courses or may include the following)

Introduction to Archives

HIS 3080

3

Historic Preservation

HIS 3086

3

History of Human Rights

HIS 3204

3

Introduction to Public History

HIS 3065

3

History of Christianity to 1500

HIS 3432

3

History of Christianity since 1500

HIS 3434

3

History of Science

HIS 3462

3

Aerospace History

HIS 4322

3

History of Western Ideas

HIS 4345

3

Religion in the Atlantic World

HIS 4435

3

Magic and Superstition in the Atlantic World

HIS 4437

3

Slavery and Abolition in the Americas

HIS 4451

3

Directed Independent Study

HIS 4906

2-3

Special Topics

HIS 4930

1-3

Internship in Public History

HIS 4944

1-3

History Study Abroad

HIS 4957

1-6

Senior Thesis in History

HIS 4970

3

World War II

WOH 4244

3

Gandhi and Hitler

WOH 4405

3

Electives Cross-Listed with Jewish Studies

Classical Jewish Civilization

JST 3403

3

Modern Jewish Civilization

JST 3404

3

American-Jewish History 1492-1990

JST 4415

3

The Jews of Spain and the Middle East

JST 4417

3

Ancient Israel

JST 4424

3

The Holocaust

JST 4701

3

Transfer students planning on a History major are expected to have completed one course each of survey-level history courses in U.S. history and World history before entering FAU. Otherwise they will have to take AMH 2010/2020 and/or WOH 2012/2022 in addition to 30 credits of upper-division work. No grade below "C" in a history course will count as fulfilling requirements for the major, and no history course may be taken under a pass/fail option.

Concentrations within the History Major
Students interested in pursuing more specialized study in the areas of Africana history, British history, legal history or religious history may wish to complete one of the concentrations below.

Students still fulfill all requirements for the History major as stipulated above, but to complete a concentration they need to include the following courses in their program.


Africana History Concentration

Students must take both core courses and choose three courses from the list of elective courses.

Core Courses

African-American History to 1877

AMH 3571

3

African-American History since 1877

AMH 3572

3

Elective Courses (choose three courses)

History of the African Diaspora

AFH 3512

3

Special Topics in African History

AFH 4930

3

American Immigration and Ethnicity

AMH 3530

3

Slavery and Abolition in the Americas

AMH 4451

3

History of African-American Women

AMH 4574

3

The Civil Rights Movement

AMH 4575

3

American Sports History

AMH 4611

3

History of the Caribbean

LAH 4470

3

Any Senior Seminar, Special Topics or 5000-level graduate course that focuses on Africana history.


British History Concentration

Students must take the three core courses below and choose two from the list of elective courses.

Core Courses

Medieval England

EUH 4500

3

Modern Britain

EUH 4502

3

Tudor-Stuart England

EUH 4511

3

Elective Courses (choose two courses)

Colonial North America

AMH 4110

3

History of Modern India

ASH 4550

3

British Empire

EUH 4530

3

Any Senior Seminar, Special Topics or 5000-level graduate course in British history.


Legal History Concentration

Students must choose 15 credits from the core and elective courses in the following list.

Core Courses (choose three courses)

The American Revolution

AMH 4133

3

The Age of Jefferson and Jackson

AMH 4150

3

Medieval England

EUH 4500

3

Tudor-Stuart England

EUH 4511

3

Elective Courses (choose two courses)

History of Florida

AMH 3420

3

History of American Immigration and Ethnicity

AMH 3530

3

American Environmental History

AMH 3630

3

The Civil Rights Movement

AMH 4575

3

Special Topics (such as History of Law in America or History of Prisons in America)

AMH 4930

3

History of Human Rights

HIS 3204

3


Religious History Concentration

Choose at least 15 credits from the following list, with at least one course taken in all four areas: U.S., Asian, Judaic and European history.

Religion in America

AMH 4620

3

Islamic History

ASH 3222

3

Indian Civilization

ASH 4560

3

History of Eastern Ideas

ASH 4600

3

Reformation Europe (1500-1650)

EUH 4144

3

History of Christianity to 1500

HIS 3432

3

History of Christianity since 1500

HIS 3434

3

American-Jewish History 1492-1990

JST 4415

3

Any Senior Seminar, Special Topics or 5000-level graduate course in religious history


Honors Program in History

To be eligible for the Honors Program in History, students must have completed between 60 and 90 credits with an overall GPA of at least 3.2 and a GPA in history courses of at least 3.5. Such students will receive the designation "Honors in History" at the time of graduation upon satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

  1. Completion of all normal field distribution requirements for the History major with a 3.5 at the time of graduation.
  2. An overall GPA of at least 3.2.
  3.  Receipt of a grade of "B" or higher in both RI: Historical Methods (HIS 3150) and RI: Senior Seminar (HIS 4935).
  4. Completion of a 40-50-page Senior Thesis (HIS 4970, 3 credits) with a grade of "B" or higher, under the direction of a tenured or tenure-track faculty member.

Students in the Honors Program in History who complete all requirements but do not meet the GPA requirements for honors at the time of graduation will receive credit for all work completed but will not be certified as having received honors. Students interested in the Honors Program in History should contact the director of Undergraduate Studies of the Department of History, Dr. Patricia Kollander, kollande@fau.edu.


History
Undergraduate Minor

(Minimum of 18 credits required)

Students majoring in any discipline other than History are eligible to complete a minor in History. This minor allows students to tailor their courses to a particular area of history or select a broad assortment of courses in different areas. The minor requires completion of 18 credits in history courses, at least 15 of which must be at the upper division in at least two out of five geographical areas (U.S., Europe, Africa, Latin America, Non-Western). Of the 18 credits, at least 15 must be taken at FAU. Students interested in the minor should contact the Department of History.

Secondary Education Program
A program leading to teacher certification in Social Science is available through the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education.

Link to Combined Program with Wilkes Honors College


History
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) to Master of Arts (M.A.)
Combined Program

(Minimum of 150 or 156 credits required)

The B.A./M.A. with major in History combined degree program enables outstanding students to graduate with both a Bachelor of Arts in History (B.A.) and a Master of Arts in History (M.A.) in as little as five years. The program is 150 credits (B.A./M.A. with thesis option) or 156 credits (B.A./M.A. without thesis option). Students complete 120 credits for the undergraduate degree and 30 credits (thesis option) or 36 credits (non-thesis option) for the graduate degree. Students complete the undergraduate degree first, taking no more than 12 credits of graduate coursework in their senior year, which are then used to satisfy requirements for both degrees. Prospective students must formally apply to this program and meet all admission requirements.

Admission Requirements

  1.  Each applicant must be a declared History major at Florida Atlantic University, with 60-90 credits completed toward the B.A. degree, including HIS 3150: RI: Historical Methods, and HIS 4935: RI: Senior Seminar.
  2.  Applicants must have a minimum 3.25 GPA for the last 60 undergraduate credits attempted.
  3.  Applicants must submit two letters of recommendation, written by tenured or tenure-earning members of the Department of History.
  4. Applicants must provide a writing sample as part of their application. This should be a term paper or lengthy essay.
  5. Applicants must provide a two-to-three-page typed, double-spaced autobiographical statement indicating the nature of their preparation for graduate work and the reasons for seeking the combined B.A./M.A. degree in History.
  6. Prospective applicants for the combined B.A./M.A. degree in History are encouraged to schedule an interview with the department's Director of Graduate Studies.
  7. The application deadline is October 15 for Spring admission, and June 1 for Fall admission.


Undergraduate Course Replacements

In their senior year, students admitted to the combined degree program may take up to 12 credits of graduate coursework, which are then used to satisfy requirements for both degrees. This will be accomplished by substituting 12 credits of free elective credit at the upper division (3000- 4000- level) with HIS 5060: The Historical Experience, and 9 credits of additional graduate coursework with the course prefix AMH, EUH, HIS, LAH, or WOH at the 5000 or 6000 level.

Degree Requirements
To be eligible for the combined B.A./M.A. degree in History, students must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Completion of all requirements for the B.A. in History major, in addition to other requirements as stipulated by the University and the College.
  2. Completion of all requirements for the M.A. in History major, on either the thesis or non-thesis option. 


Master's Program

History
Master of Arts (M.A.)

(Minimum of 30 or 36 credits required)

Admission Requirements 
The Master of Arts degree in History is designed to prepare graduates for doctoral work in history; for museum, preservation and public history work; for employment in education, government or industry; for admission to law school; to qualify instructors in history for community college teaching; and to enhance historical skills and content for secondary school social studies teachers.

  1. Each applicant should have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution, preferably with an undergraduate major in history. Applicants without an undergraduate history major may be admitted on condition that appropriate undergraduate coursework in history be completed in addition to all requirements for the M.A. degree.
  2. Applicants must have a minimum 3.0 grade point average (GPA) for the last 60 undergraduate credits attempted.
  3. Applicants must have two letters of recommendation sent directly to FAU via the online application portal.
  4. Applicants must upload, as part of their online application, a writing sample. This should be a term paper or lengthy essay.
  5. Applicants must upload, as part of their online application, a two-to-three-page typed, double-spaced autobiographical statement indicating the nature of their preparation for graduate work and the reasons for seeking the M.A. in history.
  6. Prospective applicants for graduate work in history are encouraged to schedule an interview with the department's director of Graduate Studies.
  7. Applicants who fail to meet the GPA requirements, and/or who lack a strong background in history, may be admitted on a conditional basis.

Degree Requirements
The Master of Arts in History has two options: 1) the thesis option, requiring 30 credits with a minimum of 24 credits of graduate coursework and completion of the M.A. thesis, for which a minimum of 6 additional credits must be earned; and 2) the non-thesis option, requiring 36 credits of graduate coursework. Graduate courses in history are of two types: readings (5000 level) and research seminars (6000 level). These readings and research seminars are offered in the following fields: Asian, Comparative, European, Florida, Latin American, Middle Eastern, Public, U.S. and World History. Students must choose a major field from among the following: European, U.S., and World History. Those who select U.S. History as their major field may include in their total program up to two public history courses, including internships.

While students may take additional credits of directed independent studies (DIS), only 3 credits may be counted toward the degree requirements. Similarly, even though students may take more internship credits, only 3 credits may be applied to the total number required for the degree.

A grade of "B-" or below will not be accepted for credit toward the M.A. degree in History.

Qualifying Examination
In addition to the other degree requirements, all students must take and pass a qualifying examination at the end of their course of study. To pass, all students must earn at least a "B" grade on each question. The exam may be taken twice, but those students who do not pass the second time will be dismissed from the program. Those students who achieve a superior performance on the entire exam will be designated as having passed "with distinction."

For thesis-option students, this will consist of an oral examination that includes a defense of the thesis along with questions related to the larger field in which the thesis is located. For non-thesis students, the examination will consist of three written questions, of which two will be in the primary field and one in a secondary field.

Students must be enrolled at FAU during any semester in which they take the exam. Students in the non-thesis option who need to take the exam are expected to notify the graduate director in writing at least two weeks before the date it is administered and to abide by all of the procedures set out in the program website: www.fau.edu/history/graduate.php.

For the M.A. with Major in History (Thesis Option), more specific degree requirements are:

  1. All M.A. students must take HIS 5060 (The Historical Experience), a basic course that deals with historiography and changing patterns of historical interpretation, as well as with research techniques and methodologies. Students should take this course as early in their program as possible.
  2. To assure a proper distribution of courses by field, graduate students must take a minimum of 12 credits of graduate coursework in their major/thesis field (European, U.S., or World History) and a minimum of 9 credits in non-major/non-thesis fields.
  3. All M.A. students must complete a minimum of 6 credits of thesis research (HIS 6971) and complete an acceptable master's thesis.
  4. Graduate students may not take undergraduate courses for graduate credit.
  5. Graduate students who also serve as graduate assistants in the Department must complete, in addition to all other requirements, the 3-credit course HIS 5944, Teaching Practicum. Credits for this course may not be counted as part of the requirements for the 36-credit, non-thesis M.A. degree.

Core - 3 credits

The Historical Experience

HIS 5060

3

Thesis Option - 27 credits

Electives - 21 credits

Select a minimum of 18 credits from the Department of History, including a minimum of 9 credits at the 5000 level in reading seminars and a minimum of 9 credits at the 6000 level in research with prefixes of AMH, EUH, HIS, LAH or WOH. Students may substitute up to 3 credits from outside the Department for History credits, with permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

Thesis - 6 credits

Master's Thesis
(may be taken over multiple terms)

HIS 6971

6

Application for the M.A. Thesis Option
All students admitted to the M.A. program in History will be on a non-thesis trajectory. Students may switch to the M.A. thesis option under the following conditions:

  1.  Students must have achieved a minimum overall GPA of 3.75 in their graduate program by the end of the second semester of full-time study (or after completing 15 credits studying part time);
  2. Students must submit the following to the director of Graduate Studies prior to the last day of class of the second semester of full-time study (or the last day of class of the semester when the student will have completed 15 credits studying part time):
    1.  A brief paragraph indicating which professor ideally would serve as thesis advisor and explaining why the student would like to work with that particular professor;
    2.  A 3-5 page overview of the thesis (explain what the thesis is about, how existing literature on the topic is deficient, and what the thesis is proposing that is new) and a preliminary bibliography.

After grades are in for the semester during which the student is applying for the thesis option, the director of Graduate Studies will verify the applicant's overall GPA; if this falls below 3.75, the student must pursue the non-thesis option.

If the student meets the GPA requirement, the director of Graduate Studies will forward the application to the graduate committee members. The committee will communicate its decision to the Graduate Studies director, who will inform the student whether the project is accepted and, if so, under what conditions the student may proceed to write the thesis. If the application is not approved, the student must pursue the non-thesis option.

If approved for a thesis, the student's thesis advisor will put together a three-member thesis committee to oversee the research and writing of the thesis. This proposal and determination of the thesis committee must be submitted and approved by the graduate director and department chair before the student can register for thesis credits. The foreign language requirement must also be met before the student is permitted to enroll in thesis research.

For an M.A. with Major in History (Non-Thesis Option), more specific degree requirements are:

  1. All M.A. students must take HIS 5060 (The Historical Experience).
  2. To assure proper distribution of course by field, graduate students in the non-thesis option should take 18 credits in their major field (European, U.S., or World History) and the remaining 15 credits in other fields.
  3. Graduate students in the non-thesis option may not take undergraduate courses for graduate credit.
  4. Graduate students who also serve as graduate assistants in the department must complete, in addition to all other requirements, the 3-credit HIS 5944: Teaching Practicum. Credits for this course may not be counted as part of the requirements for the 36-credit non-thesis M.A. degree. 

Core - 3 credits

The Historical Experience

HIS 5060

3

Non-Thesis Option - 33 credits

Select a minimum of 30 credits from the Department of History, including a minimum of 12 credits at the 5000 level in reading seminars and a minimum of 18 credits at the 6000 level in research with prefixes of AMH, EUH, HIS, LAH or WOH. Students may substitute up to 3 credits from outside the Department for History credits, with permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

The Plan of Study
All students in the M.A. program in history must file with the Graduate College a Plan of Study upon completion of 9 credits of qualified coursework. This form is completed by the student in consultation with the graduate director. Approval of this plan certifies that the student has demonstrated the ability to do acceptable graduate work. Those students who make changes to their Plan of Study after the original plan is submitted are required to file a Revision to an Existing Plan of Study form in the last semester before graduation. The forms for completion can be accessed through the Graduate College website. Failure to file these forms as required will prevent the student from graduating.

Foreign Language Requirement
In addition to the other degree requirements, all students must fulfill the department language requirement before conferral of the degree through one of the following three options.

  1.  Passing one semester of a foreign language at the intermediate level (2220) at FAU or the equivalent at another university, as determined by the History Department's graduate committee.
  2. Passing an equivalency exam at the intermediate (2220) level.
  3. Passing the graduate Reading for Research course (FRE/GER/SPN 5060).

It is strongly encouraged that students fulfill this requirement soon after beginning their graduate studies.

To qualify for the M.A. degree in history, all students must have the recommendation of the graduate director and the department chair, as well as the dean of the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters.


Interdisciplinary Studies

Interdisciplinary Studies
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Concentrations:
Arts and Humanities 

Community and Visual Design 
Pre-Law 
Social Science 
Women, Gender and Sexuality

(Minimum of 120 credits required)

The Interdisciplinary Studies program is for students who wish to concentrate generally in the arts, humanities and social science without a specific departmental major. The knowledge and intellectual training provided is good preparation for graduate study in the fields of the arts and humanities, the study of law, the ministry and careers in public service professions. Five concentrations are available within the Interdisciplinary Studies program: Arts and Humanities, Community and Visual Design, Pre-Law, Social Science, and Women, Gender and Sexuality. The program is also available fully online with three options: the general degree program, the general program with the Arts and Humanities concentration, and the general program with the Social Science concentration.

Students who wish to pursue the Interdisciplinary Studies major should contact The Office of Student Academic Services for advising and more information. Degree requirements for Interdisciplinary Studies and the five concentrations are shown below.

Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students
Students transferring to Florida Atlantic University must complete both lower-division requirements (including the requirements of the General Education Program) and requirements for the College and major. Lower-division requirements may be completed through the A.A. degree from any Florida public college, university or community college or through equivalent coursework at another regionally accredited institution. Before transferring and to ensure timely progress toward the baccalaureate degree, students must also complete the prerequisite courses for their major as outlined in the Transition Guides .

All courses not approved by the Florida Statewide Course Numbering System that will be used to satisfy requirements will be evaluated individually on the basis of content and will require a catalog course description and a copy of the syllabus for assessment.

Degree Requirements
In addition to the University and College requirements for admission and graduation, including the University foreign language graduation requirement, the requirements for the major in Interdisciplinary Studies are as follows:

  1. 39 credits; 30 must be upper division.
  2. 15-18 credits must be in a single discipline, with a minimum of 12 upper-division credits. No more than 18 credits may be taken in any one area.
  3. Up to 15 credits from another college may be applied to the major.
  4. Students choose a primary area of concentration and develop a plan of study in consultation with the program director. Courses may be taken from across the college.
  5. Earn a "C" or better in all courses applied toward the major. No course taken on a pass/fail basis may be counted for the major.
  6. All students must take IDS 3949 or SLS 4342 for 3 credits (or an approved equivalent) and IDS 3890.
  7. IDS 4930, when offered, may substitute for IDS 3890.


Areas of Concentration

Five areas of concentration are available: Arts and Humanities; Community and Visual Design; Pre-Law; Social Science; and Women, Gender and Sexuality. The program director must approve appropriate courses from other disciplines.

Arts and Humanities Concentration
Students may choose from the following disciplines: Architecture, Communication and Multimedia Studies; English; History; Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature; Music; Philosophy; Theatre and Dance; Art and Art History; and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. The program director may approve courses from any of these disciplines or programs as well as appropriate courses from other disciplines across the University and/or other disciplines or programs within the College of Arts and Letters.

Community and Visual Design Concentration
Students may choose from the following disciplines: Architecture, Art, Multimedia Studies: Film and Media, Political Science, Public Administration and Sociology. The program director may approve courses from any of these disciplines or programs as well as appropriate courses from other disciplines (Geography, Business, Urban Planning) across the University and other disciplines or programs within the College of Arts and Letters.

Pre-Law Concentration
In addition to the Interdisciplinary Studies degree requirements, the following also apply to this concentration area.

  1. All coursework for the major should come from the list below.
  2. Students may select a primary discipline in Communication and Multimedia Studies, Criminology and Criminal Justice, English, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology or Theatre and Dance.
  3. Secondary disciplines must be chosen from the list below.
  4. The required internship should be law related.

Communication and Multimedia Studies

Conflict and Communication

COM 3462

3

Political Communication

COM 3500

3

Mass Communication Law and Regulation

MMC 4200

3

Classical Rhetoric

SPC 3233

3

Rhetorical Analysis of Democracy

SPC 4273

3

Argumentation and Debate

SPC 4513

3

Rhetorical Criticism

SPC 4680

3

Criminology and Criminal Justice

Law, Crime and the Criminal Justice System

CCJ 2002

3

The Criminal Justice System

CCJ 3024

3

Ethics and the Justice System

CCJ 4054

3

Restorative Community Justice

CCJ 4141

3

Drug Courts

CCJ 4293

3

RI: Drug Courts

CCJ 4293

3

Death Penalty

CCJ 4361

3

Elders and the Criminal Justice System

CCJ 4632

3

White Collar Crime

CCJ 4644

3

Race, Ethnicity and Criminal Justice

CCJ 4662

3

Human Trafficking: A Global Social Justice Issue

CCJ 4694

3

Issues in Criminal Law

CCJ 4931

3

Corrections

CJC 4310

3

International Criminal Justices Systems

CJE 4174

3

Policing in America

CJE 4352

3

Fundamentals of Criminal Investigations

CJE 4610

3

Juvenile Justice Administration

CJJ 4010

3

Criminal Law and the Constitution

CJL 4064

3

Judicial Administration and the Criminal Courts

CJL 4510

3

English

Writing for the Technical Professions

ENC 2248

3

Professional Writing

ENC 3213

3

Advanced Exposition

ENC 3310

3

Principles of Research Writing

ENC 4138

3

Writing for Nonprofits

ENC 4354

3

Studies in Writing and Rhetoric

ENG 4020

3

Literary Theory

LIT 3213

3

History

History of Florida

AMH 3420

3

History of American Immigration and Ethnicity

AMH 3530

3

American Environmental History

AMH 3630

3

The American Revolution

AMH 4133

3

Age of Jefferson and Jackson

AMH 4150

3

History of the Civil Rights Movement

AMH 4575

3

Medieval England

EUH 4500

3

Tudor-Stuart England

EUH 4511

3

History of Human Rights

HIS 3204

3

Music

Introduction to Music Business

MUM 3301

3

Legal Issues for the Musician

MUM 3303

3

Music Publishing and Copyright

MUM 4304

3

Artist Management

MUM 4724

3

Music Marketing and Public Relations

MUM 4732

3

Philosophy

Critical Thinking

PHI 2100

3

Logic

PHI 2102

3

Moral Problems

PHI 3638

3

Ethical Theory

PHI 4661

3

Social and Political Philosophy

PHM 3200

3

Philosophy of Law

PHM 3400

3

Analytical Philosophy

PHP 4784

3

Political Science

International Law: Foundations and Institutions

INR 3403

3

International Law of Peace and Diplomacy

INR 3413

3

International Law of Armed Conflict

INR 3433

3

The Politics of Human Rights

INR 4075

3

The International System

INR 4081

3

Law and American Society

POS 3691

3

Constitutional Law: Government Powers and Limits

POS 4603

3

Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties

POS 4604

3

The Judicial Process

POS 4609

3

U.S. Environmental Law and Policy

POS 4697

3

Government and the Economy

PUP 4710

3

Public Administration

Introduction to Public Safety Administration

PAD 3820