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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science

This section of the Preliminary 2015-2016 University Catalog includes revisions received after the 2014-2015 catalog's publish date of June 3, 2014. Revisions appear in red.

Course Descriptions


Biological Sciences

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Complex Systems and Brain Sciences

Environmental Sciences

Geosciences
Interdisciplinary Studies

Mathematical Sciences

Physics

Psychology



Link to Charles E. Schmidt College of Science Programs


Biological Sciences


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.


* Vascular Plant Anatomy (BOT 3223) 2 credits

Prerequisite: One year of general biology, including general botany; Corequisite: BOT 3223L
A study of the origin, structure and function of the principal cells, tissues and organs of the vascular plants with emphasis on the angiosperms. Lecture and laboratory.

Vascular Plants Lab (BOT 3223L) 2 credits
Corequisite: BOT 3223
A laboratory examination of the major taxa of vascular plants.

* Marine Botany (BOT 4404) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, PCB 4043
An introduction to marine plants in the pelagic open-ocean and coastal environments. Focuses on systematics, life history strategies and the ecology of both phytoplankton and benthic marine plant communities.

* Marine Botany Lab (BOT 4404L) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, PCB 4043
Corequisite: BOT 4404

A review of laboratory and field techniques for research of the biology and ecology of marine plants, including algal identification and the determination of primary productivity.

* Principles of Plant Physiology (BOT 4503) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L
Principles of water economy, photosynthesis, respiration, growth and reproduction. Principles of plant-environment interactions.

* Plant Physiology Lab (BOT 4503L) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L
Corequisite: BOT 4503
Investigation of plant water economy, photosynthesis, respiration, growth and reproduction, conducted in the laboratory, greenhouse and the field.

* Plant Biotechnology (BOT 4734C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BOT 4503, 4503L
Course provides materials to help students gain current knowledge of structure and function of plant genomes, genes, and gene products; to learn hands-on techniques of DNA-transfer-based plant biotechnology; and to train for a professional career in plant/agriculture biotechnology research.

* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.

Life Science (BSC 1005) 2 credits
A survey of life on earth for non-majors. Evolution, anatomy, physiology, genetics, reproduction, and ecology are stressed. Lectures and discussions also demonstrate how biological knowledge is relevant to social, economic environmental and philosophical problems. This is a General Education course.

* Life Science Lab (BSC 1005L) 1 credit
Pre or Corequisite: BSC 1005
Laboratory investigation of biological knowledge relevant to social, economic, environmental and philosophical problems. This is a General Education course.

Biological Principles (BSC 1010) 3 credits
Corequisite: BSC 1010L
A comprehensive treatment of biological principles, including the scientific method, evolution and natural selection, cell biology, energy transformation, reproduction, development, genetics and molecular biology. This is a General Education course.

Biological Principles Lab (BSC 1010L) 1 credit
Corequisite: BSC 1010
An introduction to general laboratory procedures to demonstrate the basic principle of biology. This is a General Education course.

Biodiversity (BSC 1011) 3 credits
Corequisite: BSC 1011L
An introduction and survey of organismal diversity, including fungi, protists, plants and animals. Phylogenetic relationships, evolutionary mechanisms, and ecological processes are emphasized. Origins of life and human evolution. This is a General Education course.

Biodiversity Lab (BSC 1011L) 1 credit
Corequisite: BSC 1011
A survey of the diversity of eukaryotic organisms. This is a General Education course.

University Honors Seminar in Biological Sciences (BSC 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in biological sciences.

Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BSC 2085) 3 credits
A study of structure and physiology from the cellular to the system levels in the human body, including integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine. This is a General Education course.

Anatomy and Physiology 1 Lab (BSC 2085L) 1 credit
Laboratory investigations to augment the content of BSC 2085. This is a General Education course.

Anatomy and Physiology 2 (BSC 2086) 3 credits
A study of the structure and functions of the following systems in the human body: cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive.

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* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.

Anatomy and Physiology 2 Lab (BSC 2086L) 1 credit

Laboratory investigations to augment the content of BSC 2086.

Cooperative Education - Biology (BSC 3949) 1-3 credits
Grading: S/U

* Biotechnology Laboratory 1 (BSC 4403L) 2 credits
Prerequisites: MCB 3020, 3020L
This course covers basic techniques in molecular genetics, including those for the isolation and characterization of bacteria, plasmids, and transposons.

* Biotechnology Laboratory 2 (BSC 4448L) 2 credits
Prerequisite: BSC 4403L
This course progresses to more advanced techniques in molecular genetics, including RNA and protein purification.

* Biology of Cancer (BSC 4806) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MCB 3020
A consideration of chemical, viral and physical oncogenic agents; genetics and host factors; immunological response to neoplasia; chemotherapy.

Directed Independent Study (BSC 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Grading: S/U

Honors Research 1 (BSC 4917) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 4905 with minimum grade of "B," admission to Biology Honors Program and permission of instructor
Supervised independent research for students in the Biology Honors program. Must earn an "A" to receive Biology Honors Distinction.

Honors Thesis (BSC 4918) 3 credits
Prerequisite: BSC 4917 with minimum grade of "B"
A continuation of research initiated in BSC 4917. Requires preparation of a written paper and presentation of results at a departmental seminar. Must earn an "A" to receive Biology Honors Distinction.

Special Topics (BSC 4930) 1-3 credits
Special topics of interest to biological sciences students.

* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.

Microbiology for Health Services (MCB 2004) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010 and BSC 1010L, or BSC 2085 and BSC 2085L, or BSC 2086 and BSC 2086L
Corequisite: MCB 2004
Introduction to microbiology with emphasis on the role of microbiology in health services. Covers the progressions and control of bacterial infections. Not acceptable as a substitute for MCB 3020 or as biology elective credit for Biology majors.

Microbiology for Health Services Lab (MCB 2004L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010 and BSC 1010L, or BSC 2085 and BSC 2085L, or BSC 2086 and BSC 2086L
Introduction and demonstration of basic techniques in immunology, virology and bacteriology. Not acceptable as biology elective for Biology majors or as a substitute for MCB 3020L.

* General Microbiology (MCB 3020) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L
A survey of microbiological concepts, microbial types and the use of microorganisms in medicine, agriculture and industry. Lecture.

* General Microbiology Lab (MCB 3020L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L
The application of fundamental techniques in the isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms. Laboratory.

* Medical Bacteriology (MCB 4203) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MCB 3020
The classification and epidemiology of bacteria infecting humans. The role of host defenses in prevention and/or limitation of infection by these organisms and careful examination of the progression of the infections to the disease state. Lecture.

* Virology (MCB 4503) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MCB 3020, 3020L, BCH 3033
An in-depth examination of the physical and structural characteristics, and the methods of replication of mammalian viruses. Viral pathogenesis, immunology, antiviral therapy, transformation, prions, and a detailed examination of human pathogenic viruses.

* Microbial Ecology (MCB 4603) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 8 credits of general biology; 8 credits of general chemistry
A study of factors influencing microorganisms in the environment and the influence of microorganism on the environment.

* Topics in Microbiology (MCB 4930) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: 8 credits in microbiology; permission of instructor
A detailed consideration of specialized areas in microbiology, including bacterial genetics, bacterial physiology and mycology. Lecture.

* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.

* Marine Biodiversity (OCB 4032) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, CHM 2210, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L
Corequisite: OCB 4032L

An overview of the diversity of marine algae, plants and animals, emphasizing the marine biota of Florida, with discussions of marine biodiversity issues.

* Marine Biodiversity Laboratory (OCB 4032L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, CHM 2210, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L
Corequisite: OCB 4032

An overview of the diversity of marine algae, plants and animals, emphasizing the marine biota of Florida, with field trips to local habitats.

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* Marine Biology (OCB 4043) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, ZOO 2203, ZOO 2203L
Corequisite: OCB 4043L

Discussions of the major concepts of modern marine biology with emphasis on life in subtropical and
tropical seas.

* Marine Biology Field Studies and Laboratory (OCB 4043L) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, ZOO 2203, ZOO 2203L
Corequisite: OCB 4043
Field studies of the varied marine habitats of southern Florida: laboratories corresponding to field studies,
field trips.

* Marine Microbiology and Molecular Biology (OCB 4525) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L; Corequisite: OCB 4525L
An overview of microbiology and molecular biology in the context of marine ecosystems. The course covers diverse aspects of marine microbiology and molecular biology, including both fundamental concepts and specialized topics, such as symbiosis, extreme environments, and biotechnological applications.

* Marine Microbiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory (OCB 4525L) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L; Corequisite: OCB 4525
An overview of microbiology and molecular biology techniques in the context of marine ecosystems. Three house of lab every week.

* Marine Ecology (OCB 4633) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, CHM 2210, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L
Corequisite: OCB 4633L

Basic and advanced concepts of marine ecology, including the history of the field, population dynamics in marine systems and the internal and external mechanisms that control marine populations. The final third of the class is an overview of the major marine ecosystems of the world.

* Marine Ecology Laboratory (OCB 4633L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, CHM 2210, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L
Corequisite: OCB 4633

A hands-on laboratory course focusing on the ecology of marine organisms. Field sampling trips to local habitats complement laboratory-based activities. Six hours of lab every two weeks.

* Marine Science (OCE 4006) 4 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, CHM 2210, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L
An introduction to geological, chemical and physical oceanography.

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* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.

* Genetics (PCB 3063) 4 credits

Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L
An in-depth analysis of the mechanisms that operate in transmission genetics and an introduction to eucaryotic molecular genetics.

Issues in Human Ecology (PCB 3352) 3 credits
A discussion and analysis of the major environmental issues confronting modern humans, with emphasis on southern Florida.

* Human Morphology and Function 1 (PCB 3703) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L, CHM 2210, 2211; Corequisite: PCB 3703L
Normal structure and physiology of the human skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. Lecture format. Designed for the preprofessional student planning admission into a graduate clinical program.

* Human Morphology and Function 1 Laboratory (PCB 3703L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L, CHM 2210, 2211; Corequisite: PCB 3703
Laboratory exercises illustrating principles presented in PCB 3703, considering the anatomy and physiology of the human skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. Designed for the preprofessional student planning admission into graduate clinical programs.

* Human Morphology and Function 2 (PCB 3704) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L, CHM 2210, 2211; Corequisite: PCB 3704L
Normal structure and physiology of the human cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Lecture format. Designed for the preprofessional student planning admission into graduate clinical programs.

* Human Morphology and Function 2 Laboratory (PCB 3704L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L, CHM 2210, 2211; Corequisite: PCB 3704
Laboratory exercises illustrating principles presented in PCB 3704, considering anatomy and physiology of the human cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Designed for the preprofessional student planning admission into graduate clinical programs.

* Molecular and Cell Biology (PCB 4023) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BCH 3033 and PCB 3063
Genetics at the molecular level as related to gene structure, function, variation and control with a comprehensive treatment of plant and animal cell structure and function. Basic concepts of cell physiology are treated. Lecture.

* Principles of Ecology (PCB 4043) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 8 credits in general biology, 8 credits in general chemistry, or permission of instructor
A functional approach to the basic principles and concepts of modern ecology. Lecture and field trips.

* Immunology (PCB 4233) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MCB 3020, 3020L, BCH 3033
The tissues, cells and biochemical components of the immune system, and the role of immune responses in the diagnosis and prevention of disease. Lecture.

* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.

* Molecular Genetics (PCB 4522) 4 credits
Prerequisite: MCB 3020; Prerequisite or Corequisite: BCH 3033
The genetic control and molecular basis of gene expression.

* Evolution (PCB 4674) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PCB 3063
An in-depth examination of the mechanisms that operate in the evolutionary process.

* Comparative Animal Physiology (PCB 4723) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, CHM 2210, CHM 2211
A comparison among vertebrates of major physiological systems; nerve, muscle, respiration, circulation, osmoregulation, excretion, temperature regulation and energy metabolism.

* Comparative Animal Physiology Lab (PCB 4723L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, CHM 2210, CHM 2211
Corequisite: PCB 4723
Laboratory experiments designed to explore fundamental physiological processes.

Cellular Neuroscience and Disease (PCB 4842) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PCB 3063 and PCB 4023 with minimum grades of "B"
Course covers cellular neuroscience with a focus on human neurological diseases and disorders. Lectures provide the basic knowledge about cellular and molecular neuroscience. Discussions, presentations, and proposal writing are aimed to stimulate independent thinking about neuroscience research topics.

Practical Cell Neuroscience (PCB 4843C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PCB 3063, PCB 4023, and PCB 4842 with minimum grades of "B"
This course focuses on understanding neurophysiological signaling at the cellular level. It looks at signaling from the perspective of single ion channels to cellular synaptic transmission. Students learn through both theory and practical laboratory experiments and apply these principles in an experimental proposal that they present and execute, resulting in a final report.

* Invertebrate Zoology (ZOO 2203) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 8 credits in general biology; Corequisite: ZOO 2203L
A survey of the invertebrate phyla from the Protozoa through the lower Chordate stressing comparative aspects of morphology and development as well as phylogenetic aspects and ecology.

Invertebrate Zoology Lab (ZOO 2203L) 2 credits
Corequisite: ZOO 2203
Laboratory studies of the structure and diversity of invertebrate organisms.

* Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C-" or better.

* Vertebrate Zoology (ZOO 2303) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L; Corequisite: ZOO 2303L
A study of the structure, relationships and natural history of the vertebrates with special emphasis on the ecology of subtropical and neotropical species.

Vertebrate Zoology Lab (ZOO 2303L) 1 credit
Corequisite: ZOO 2303
A laboratory examination of selected topics in the biology of vertebrates, including formal surveys of the taxa and occasional weekend field trips.

* Functional Biology of Marine Animals (ZOO 4402) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1011, OCB 4043; Corequisite: ZOO 4402L
Course examines various aspects of the functional biology of marine animals, including physiology, feeding, locomotion, morphology and sensory biology. Emphasis on identifying major biological challenges, such as pressure and temperature extremes, then analyzing adaptations developed by marine animals to deal with these challenges.

* Functional Biology of Marine Animals Laboratory (ZOO 4402L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: BSC 1010L, BSC 1011L, OCB 4043L; Corequisite: ZOO 4402
An overview of techniques used to study the physiological and morphological adaptations of marine animals.

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* Ornithology (ZOO 4472) 2 credits
Prerequisite: 8 credits of biology; Corequisite: ZOO 4472L
The study of the anatomy, physiology, taxonomy, evolution, ecology and special adaptations of birds. Lecture.

Ornithology Laboratory (ZOO 4472L) 2 credits
Corequisite: ZOO 4472
Laboratory and field study of birds. Also includes field identification of major groups of birds. Laboratory and field study.

Topics in Ornithology (ZOO 4479C) 1-4 credits
Studies in specialized areas of avian biology including avian nutrition and disease, avian captive breeding, etc. Lecture and laboratory.

* Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis (ZOO 4690) 3 credits
Prerequisite: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L
Corequisite: ZOO 4690L
A study of vertebrate anatomy, with emphasis on developmental processes, evolution and functional morphology.

* Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis Lab (ZOO 4690L) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 1011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L with minimum grades of "C-"
Corequisite: ZOO 4690
A laboratory examination of early development, anatomy and functional relationships of chordate animals through microscopic observation and dissection of preserved specimens.

Biological Sciences Graduate Courses

Flora of South Florida (BOT 5155) 2 credits
Prerequisites: BOT 3223, 3223L, or the equivalent, or permission of instructor
Corequisite: BOT 5155L

A study of the major plant associations existing in southern Florida, their positions in the ecology of the region, and the history of their relationships to the temperate and tropical floras.

Flora of South Florida Laboratory (BOT 5155L) 2 credits
Corequisite: BOT 5155
An examination of the plants and plant associations in southern Florida, including laboratory and field trips.

Coastal Plant Ecology (BOT 6606) 2 credits
Prerequisite: PCB 4043 or ecology equivalent; Corequisite: BOT 6606L
Provides an in-depth analysis of current topics of coastal plant ecology including marsh, mangrove, lagoonal, and reef ecosystems.

Coastal Plant Ecology Lab (BOT 6606L) 2 credits
Prerequisites: PCB 4043; Corequisite: BOT 6606
Field studies of marsh, mangrove, lagoon, and coral reef ecosystems with an emphasis on the flora. Research techniques and data analyses for studying coastal plant ecology are stressed.

Special Topics (BSC 5931) 1-4 credits

Advances in Finfish Aquaculture (BSC 6342) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Culture of Marine Organisms or permission of instructor
Explores issues affecting finfish aquaculture for food production and fisheries stock enhancement worldwide. Topics include sustainability, new and historic methods for fish culture and issues and controversies faced by finfish aquaculturists.
(New course effective spring 2015.)

Introduction to Marine Biotechnology (BSC 6346) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Introduces the principles and practices of Marine Biotechnology and its commercial applications: 1) the cultivation and genetic manipulation of marine microorganisms, invertebrates and vertebrates; 2) disease impacts in aquaculture systems; 3) the discovery and production of commercially relevant products; 4) policy related to the commercial development of marine resources.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Symbiosis (BSC 6365) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or B.S. degree in biology or science with two courses in general biology
Introduces concepts of symbiosis and the role of such associations in the evolution, coevolution, and ecology of organisms.

Integrative Biology 1 (BSC 6390) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Through lectures, readings, journal club, classroom discussions, and student papers, course explores the idea of integrative biology and connectivity in biological systems.

Integrative Biology 2 (BSC 6391) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Through lectures, readings, classroom discussions, journal club, and student papers, course explores integrative biology and connectivity in biological systems. Emphasis on molecular and cellular biology.
(Course terminated summer 2014.)

Bioinformatics (BSC 6458C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
A practical approach to accessing nucleic/protein databases, management of databases, identification of genes, and electronic expression profiling.

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Scientific Communication (BSC 6846) 3 credits
Introduces students interested in scientific research to various techniques and software important for data processing and presentation of research data. Students learn to effectively present research to the general public and to the scientific community in written form, such as research proposals, conference presentations, seminars and publications.

Directed Independent Study (BSC 6905) 1-3 credits
Grading: S/U

Seminar (BSC 6935) 1 credit
Grading: S/U

Special Topics (BSC 6936) 1-4 credits

Ecology Research Seminar (BSC 6937) 1 credit

A seminar course in which students select papers from ecological literature and facilitate discussions with other students and professors. Course grading is dependent on participation in class discussions. All students will lead at least one paper discussion.
Grading: S/U

Journal Club - Molecular Biology (BSC 6956) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Molecular biology
A practical approach to learning how to discuss scientific literature in molecular biology in a journal club format.

Master's Thesis (BSC 6971) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of major professor
Grading: S/U

Advanced Research in Integrative Biology (BSC 7978) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. program in Integrative Biology
Research that is focused and relevant to the student's course of study in the Ph.D. program in Integrative Biology. This course requires oversight by the student's dissertation advisor, who can grade the student's performance at the end of the semester. Grading: S/U

Dissertation (BSC 7980) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral candidacy
Dissertation research in Ph.D. program in Integrative Biology. Grading: S/U

Environmental Sciences Directed Independent Study (EVS 6905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course provides graduate students with concrete research experience in a particular area of environmental science not normally covered in a course. Grading: S/U

Environmental Sciences Colloquium Series (EVS 6920) 1 credit
Environmental Sciences students attend colloquia presented by faculty, professional environmental scientists and advanced graduate students. Students gain experience in written and oral communication through class discussions, writing assignments and presentations. Grading: S/U

Environmental Sciences Master's Thesis (EVS 6971) 1-6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course is intended for graduate students conducting original research on their master's thesis topic.
Grading S/U

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Advanced Topics in Microbiology (MCB 6930) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: 16 credits in microbiology and permission of instructor
A critical review of specialized topics in bacteriology, virology, mycology, immunology, or other areas of microbiology. This is a lecture course.

Coral Reef Ecosystems (OCB 6266) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Explores the structure, biology, ecology, significance and current status of coral reef ecosystems through a combination of lectures and discussions.

Coral Reef Ecosystems Lab (OCB 6266L)
Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to swim/snorkel 400 yards continuously using a snorkel vest and, preferred but not required, open water scuba certification
Field-and-laboratory-based exploration of coral reef ecosystems focused on coral identification and underwater scientific methods for coral research.

Data Processing and Modeling of Marine Systems (OCB 6673) 3 credits

Prerequisites: Marine Science 1 and 2
Provides tools, methods and numerical recipes to study ocean processes from in-situ observations and ocean numerical models. Provides an overview of current ocean models and biophysical and biogeochemical models, and their applications.

Natural History of the Indian River Lagoon (OCB 6810) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
An overview of the marine plants and animals, habitats, and environmental conditions in the Indian River Lagoon, including human impacts. Field trips to local habitats complement lecture and labs.

Marine Global Change (OCE 6019) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Introduction to long-term and global scale changes in terrestrial and marine environments and the impact those changes have in marine settings, especially the coastal ocean. Natural and anthropogenic changes are described and compared. Topics include invasions, extinctions, climate change, food web modifications, and freshwater issues in the coastal zone.

Biological and Chemical Oceanography (OCE 6057) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, CHM 2045, BSC 1010 and BSC 1011
Explores major biological and chemical processes within the world’s ocean, including estuaries, continental margins and the open ocean.
(New course effective spring 2015.)

Conservation Biology (PCB 6045) 3 credits

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
A study of the principles and practice of conservation biology. Emphasis on the primary threats to biodiversity and the application of contemporary tools to solve conservation problems.

Advanced Ecology (PCB 6046) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PCB 4043 or ecology equivalent
Provides graduate students with a background in development of ecology as a science and current ecological theory and application of ecology for ecosystem management.

Advanced Immunology (PCB 6236) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PCB 4233
A study of the chemical and biological natures of antigens and antibodies: their preparation and reactions in vivo and in vitro, their applications in basic science and therapy, and the immunochemical and experimental methods involved with tagged or free immunologic products. It is a lecture course.

Freshwater Ecology (PCB 6307)3 credits
Prerequisites: ZOO 2203, ZOO 2203L; Corequisite: PCB 6307L
A study of limnological processes, with an emphasis on subtropical freshwater habitats, their physicochemical characteristics, and associated fauna and flora.

Freshwater Ecology Laboratory and Field Studies (PCB 6307L) 2 credits
Corequisite: PCB 6307
A field oriented study of the freshwater plants and animals of southern Florida and the techniques employed on the analysis of freshwater habitats.

Marine and Estuarine Community Dynamics (PCB 6316) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Community, landscape, food web and similar features of marine systems are studied. Both basic and applied (conversation and restoration) aspects of communities are included.
(New course effective fall 2015.)

Marine Ecology (PCB 6317) 3 credits
Prerequisites: ZOO 2203 and OCB 4043; Corequisite: PCB 6317L
A study of the principles, concepts, and techniques of marine and estuarine ecology. Environmental factors, adaptations, habitats, communities, and applications of current ecological theory are studied. Lecture, laboratory, and field work are included.

Marine Ecology Laboratory and Field Studies (PCB 6317L) 2 credits
Corequisite: PCB 6317
A study of the Methods and Techniques of marine ecological research and their application in the field. Data collections, analysis and presentation.

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Ecological Theory (PCB 6406) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PCB 4043 or equivalent and senior or graduate level proficiency in Biology or permission of instructor
A functional approach to and a critical examination of the principles and concepts in ecosystem theory.

Experimental Design and Biometry (PCB 6456) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Covers experimental design and statistical analysis in biology and ecology. Students learn probability theory basics, univariate and multivariate analyses, proper experimental design such as replication and blocking, and how to use the SAS software application.

Advanced Multivariate Biometry (PCB 6457) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PCB 6456 or equivalent or permission of instructor
Involves learning advanced techniques for analyzing biological and ecological data including time-series analyses, structural equation modeling, MDS, multiple regression and other methods.
(New course effective spring 2015.)

Marine Molecular Biology (PCB 6465) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate status
Examines emerging molecular technologies and their application in the marine sciences through a combination of lecture, discussion and debates.
(New course effective spring 2016.)

Environmental Physiology (PCB 6749C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PCB 4723
An in-depth examination of the interaction between animals and their physical environment, with an emphasis on behavioral and physiological responses of terrestrial vertebrates to a variety of stressful environments. Lecture, discussion, laboratory, and field work are involved.

Aquatic Animal Health (PCB 6772) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
A comprehensive study of basic processes in aquatic organisms, with an emphasis on marine fish and invertebrates.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Physiology of Marine Animals (PCB 6775) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 4 credits in physiology
A study of how marine animals function in their environment.

Cellular Neuroscience and Disease (PCB 6849) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PCB 3063 and permission of instructor; Corequiste: PCB 4023
This course focuses on the cellular aspect of human neurological diseases, analyzing different signaling pathways and connecting malfunctions in them to various neurological disorders.

Sensory Biology and Behavior of Fishes (PCB 6871) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
A study of the anatomy and physiology of sensory structures in fishes, as well as the neural processing and behaviors elicited by these senses. Topics include vision, olfaction, audition, gustation, lateral line, tactile and electrosensation.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Marine Invertebrate Zoology (ZOO 6256) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ZOO 2203 or permission of instructor; Corequisite: ZOO 6256L
A study of morphology, systematics, phylogenetic relationships, ecology, and life histories of marine invertebrates. It includes lecture, laboratory, and field problems.

Marine Invertebrate Zoology Lab (ZOO 6256L) 2 credits
Corequisite: ZOO 6256
Collection of marine invertebrates aboard a research vessel and various marine habitats in southern Florida.

Bivalve Biology and Physiology (ZOO 6257) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Undergraduate General Biology or Invertebrate Biology or permission of instructor
Examines bivalve mollusk biology, such as feeding, reproduction, stress response and population genetics, in relation to natural life history, invasion potential and culture.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

The Biology of Sea Turtles (ZOO 6406) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
This upper-level lecture, lab and field course introduces the behavioral, ecological and evolutionary adaptations of sea turtles and conservation-related topics. Major topics include species identification, functional anatomy, reproduction, migration, navigation, feeding ecology, physiology, development, nets and hatchlings, threats to survival and conservation strategies.
(New course effective summer 2014.)

Biology of Sharks and Their Relatives (ZOO 6409) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor if the student is currently enrolled as an undergraduate
Studies biology, ecology, physiology, behavior and taxonomy of the elasmobranch fishes. Includes a review of extant families and contemporary topics in elasmobiology through readings from the primary literature.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Natural History of Fishes (ZOO 6456) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Corequisite: ZOO 6456L
The natural history of marine and freshwater fishes, emphasizing anatomy, functional morphology, general classification, and phylogenetic relationships, as well as biology of fishes in different habitats. Lecture, laboratory, and field study are included.

Natural History of Fishes Lab (ZOO 6456L) 2 credits
Corequisite: ZOO 6456
A study of external and internal anatomy, osteology, and identification of fishes. Laboratory and field study are included.

Seminar in Ichthyology (ZOO 6459) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: ZOO 6456
A critical review of current literature dealing with fishes and fisheries. This course may be repeated for credit to a maximum of 4 credits. Grading: S/U

Seminar on Emerging Topics in Avian Ecology (ZOO 6544C) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Primarily student-led discussions of recent papers on an emerging selected topics in avian ecology. Topic varies each semester and has application to the broader field of ecology. Students may take the course repeatedly up to a maximum of 4 credits.
(Changes effective fall 2014.)

Histology of Fishes and Aquatic Invertebrates (ZOO 6757) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
An introduction to basic histology techniques and interpretation of normal and disease states of marine fish and invertebrates.
(New course effective spring 2015.)

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Chemistry and Biochemistry


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Biochemistry 1 (BCH 3033) 3 credits
Prerequisite: 8 credits of organic chemistry
The organic chemistry of biological compounds; carbohydrates; amino acids; peptides, and proteins; nucleosides and nucleotides; nucleic acids, replication, transcription and translation; saponifiable lipids; steroids and terpenes.

Biochemistry 2 (BCH 3034) 3 credits
Prerequisite: BCH 3033
Bioreactions and the role of enzymes and coenzymes; energy aspects; generation and utilization of ATP; metabolic pathways; regulatory mechanisms; photosynthesis.

Biochemistry Laboratory (BCH 3103L) 3 credits
Prerequisites: BCH 3033 and CHM 2211L with minimum grades "C"
An introduction to experimental techniques in physical chemistry as applied to biological systems; quantitative measurements in biochemistry.

Advanced Biochemistry (BCH 4035) 3 credits
Prerequisite: BCH 3034 with minimum grade of "C"
Introduction to biomolecular structure determinations by spectroscopic methods, principles of enzyme kinetics, transport across membranes, molecular physiology, and molecular genetics.

Contemporary Chemical Issues (CHM 1020C) 3 credits
Basic chemical principles behind contemporary chemical issues facing the local community, state, nation and the world. Topics will include water management, global warming, depletion of the ozone layer and its consequences. This is a General Education course.

Introductory Chemistry (CHM 1025) 3 credits
Introductory readiness course in general chemistry for students with weaker but satisfactory backgrounds in high school chemistry and algebra.

University Honors Seminar in Chemistry (CHM 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in chemistry.

Special Topics (CHM 1932) 1-4 credits
Special topics course in chemistry.

General Chemistry for the Health Sciences (CHM 2032) 3 credits
Corequisite: CHM 2032L
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of chemistry: scientific measurements; atomic theory; molecules and chemical bonds; chemical reactions; aqueous solutions; salts and electrolytes; acid-base theory; radioactivity and nuclear chemistry. Orientation toward majors in the allied health fields. This is a General Education course.

General Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab (CHM 2032L) 1 credit
Corequisite: CHM 2032
Intermediate experimental studies of chemical principles. This is a General Education course.

General Chemistry 1 (CHM 2045) 3 credits
Prerequisites or corequisites: Students must have passed CHM 1025 or are currently enrolled or previously passed one of the following: MAC 1105, MAC 1114, MAC 1140, MAC 1147, MAC 2233, MAC 2281, MAC 2311
Corequisite: CHM 2045L

An introduction to chemical principles, including atomic structure, chemical bonding, kinetics, thermodynamics and properties of the elements. A prerequisite to all other chemistry courses in science programs. This is a General Education course.

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General Chemistry 1 Lab (CHM 2045L) 1 credit
Corequisite: CHM 2045
An introduction to experimental techniques in chemistry designed to demonstrate basic chemical principles. This is a General Education course.

General Chemistry 2 (CHM 2046) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CHM 2045; Corequisite: CHM 2046L
An introduction to chemical principles including atomic structure, chemical bonding, kinetics, thermodynamics and properties of the elements. A prerequisite to all other chemistry courses in science programs.

General Chemistry 2 Lab (CHM 2046L) 1 credit
Prerequisites: CHM 2045, CHM 2045L; Corequisite: CHM 2046
An introduction to experimental techniques in chemistry designed to demonstrate basic chemical principles. Qualitative analysis of selected anions and cations.

Honors General Chemistry 2 (CHM 2051C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: CHM 2045 and CHM 2045L, both courses with a grade of "B" or better, and ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or better; Corequisite: ENC 2452
A writing intensive general chemistry 2 course consisting of a combined lecture and laboratory format. Topics include gases, solution chemistry, kinetics and thermodynamics, and acid-base and electron-transfer reactions.

Chemistry for Engineers (CHM 2095) 3 credits
Introduction to important concepts and principles of chemistry; emphasis on areas considered most relevant in an engineering context; practical applications of chemical principles in engineering and technology.

Organic Chemistry 1 (CHM 2210) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Minimum grades of "C" in CHM 2045, 2045L, 2046, and 2046L
A study of the compounds of carbon and their physical properties, structures, chemical behavior and reaction mechanisms.

Organic Chemistry 2 (CHM 2211) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" in CHM 2210
Continuation of CHM 2210.

Organic Chemistry Lab (CHM 2211L) 2 credits
Prerequisite: CHM 2210 and 2211 (or 2211 as corequisite)
Corequisite: CHM 2211 (or 2211 as prerequisite)

Experimental study of the synthesis, purification, and identification of organic compounds using microscale techniques.

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Chemistry Study Abroad (CHM 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Chemical Literature (CHM 3060) 1 credit
Prerequisites: 8 credits each of general and organic chemistry and some experience with a foreign language (may be taken as a corequisite)
Skills in searching the chemical literature for information on specific topics to be presented in written and oral reports.

Environmental Chemistry (CHM 3080) 3 credits
Prerequisites: CHM 2045, 2046, 2210, 2211
The chemistry of the environment. Includes processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere, and their interactions. Selected emphasis on the physical processes that distribute materials through the environment. Topics include ozone, smog, greenhouse gases, global warming, energy, pE/pH, gas laws, redox cycling of elements, organic matter, chemistry of drinking and waste waters, biocides, and green chemistry.

Quantitative Analysis (CHM 3120) 2 credits
Prerequisites: CHM 2045, 2045L, 2046, 2046L; Corequisite: CHM 3120L
Principles of analysis; gravimetric, volumetric and instrumental methods.

Quantitative Analysis Lab (CHM 3120L) 2 credits
Prerequisite: CHM 2045, 2045L, 2046, 2046L; Corequisite: CHM 3120
Experiments in volumetric, gravimetric, and instrumental methods of analysis.

Introduction to Physical Chemistry (CHM 3400) 3 credits
Prerequisite: 8 credits of general chemistry
Principles of physical chemistry with special attention to applications in earth science and oceanography. For students in earth sciences, oceanography, and engineering. This course is also intended for B.A. candidates in Chemistry.

Physical Chemistry 1 (CHM 3410) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 8 credits of general chemistry, CHM 3120, CHM 3120L, and 8 credits each of physics and calculus; Corequisite: CHM 3410L
An introduction to theories of the states of matter, thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics and factors affecting reactivity, and chemical statistics.

Physical Chemistry 1 Lab (CHM 3410L) 2 credits
Corequisite: CHM 3410
Experiments in physical chemistry.

Physical Chemistry 2 (CHM 3411) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CHM 3410; Corequisite: CHM 3411L
Continuation of CHM 3410.

Physical Chemistry 2 Lab (CHM 3411L) 2 credits
Corequisite: CHM 3411
Advanced experiments in physical chemistry.

Inorganic Chemistry (CHM 3609) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CHM 2210; Corequisite: CHM 3609L
A study of periodicity in the chemistry of the elements, descriptive inorganic chemistry, synthesis of inorganic compounds. For B.A. candidates in Chemistry.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (CHM 3609L) 1 credit
Corequisite: CHM 3609
Experiments in inorganic chemistry.

Cooperative Education - Chemistry (CHM 3949) 1-3 credits
Grading: S/U

Bioanalytical Instrumentation (CHM 4139) 2 credits
Prerequisites: CHM 3120, BCH 3033, and either PHY 2049 or PHY 2054; Corequisite: CHM 4139L
An introduction to the theory, design, and operation of advanced instrumentation currently used in research and quality control/quality assurance laboratories for the analysis and characterization of biomolecules. Topics include spectroscopic techniques, separation techniques, electrochemical methods, and statistical treatment
of data.

Bioanalytical Instrumentation Lab (CHM 4139L) 2 credits
Prerequisites: CHM 3120L, BCH 3033, and PHY 2049L; Corequisite: CHM 4139
Advanced experiments in the isolation, analysis, and characterization of biomolecules using spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods.

Organic Chemistry 3 (CHM 4220) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CHM 2211L; Corequisite: CHM 3410
An in-depth study of a wide variety of organic reactions drawing on both valence bond and molecular orbital theories to explain reactivity. Strong emphasis on curved-arrow mechanisms.

Materials Chemistry (CHM 4714) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CHM 2210
An introduction to solid-state and inorganic materials chemistry. Preparative techniques and physical methods of characterization are discussed, particularly X-ray diffraction. Semiconductors, carbon-based electronics, nanomaterials, etc. are discussed in context with their structures and optical, magnetic and conductive properties.

Directed Independent Study (CHM 4905) 1-4 credits
Grading: S/U

Senior Seminar (CHM 4930) 1 credit

Special Topics (CHM 4933) 1-4 credits

Chemistry Study Abroad (CHM 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Honors Composition for Science (ENC 2452) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: CHM 2045 and 2045L with grades of "B" or better and ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or better; Corequisite: CHM 2051C
A writing intensive general chemistry 2 course that also satisfies the requirements for College Writing 2 (ENC 1102). Topics include gases, solution chemistry, kinetics and thermodynamics, and acid-base and electron-transfer reactions. This is a General Education course.

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Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Courses

Advanced Biochemistry (BCH 6740) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Principles of biomolecular structure determination by spectroscopic methods. Enzyme kinetics. Transport mechanisms across membranes. Molecular physiology and molecular genetics.

Advanced Topics in Biochemistry (BCH 6930) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Special topics in biochemistry.

Organic Chemistry 3 (CHM 5224) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
A detailed overview of organic reaction mechanisms utilizing valence bond and molecular theories and kinetic analysis.

Materials Chemistry (CHM 5716) 3 credits
Prerequisite: College of Science or College of Engineering graduate students only
An introduction to solid-state and inorganic materials chemistry. Preparative techniques and methods of characterization are discussed, particularly X-ray diffraction. Semiconductors, carbon-based electronics, nanomaterials, etc. are discussed in context with their structures and optical, magnetic and conductive properties. A crystallography workshop is included.

Introduction to Chemical Research (CHM 5944) 1 credit
Intended to be an introduction of new graduate students to the research interests of the Department faculty. Departmental procedures and organizations will be discussed. Philosophical consideration of doing scientific research will also be discussed. All new graduate students are expected to take this course. Grading: S/U

Instrumentation (CHM 6157) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
An overview of modern instrumental techniques used in various areas of chemistry (analysis, characterization, identification). Topics include spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemistry, theory and applications.

Advanced Organic Chemistry (CHM 6225) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Introduction to the concepts of modern physical organic chemistry. Elementary molecular orbital theory and applications. Methods for determining reaction mechanisms. Linear free energy relationships. Solvolysis reactions.

Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry (CHM 6380) 3 credits
Synthesis, reaction mechanisms, and physical organic chemistry.

Kinetics and Energetics of Reactions (CHM 6720) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
A detailed look at reactions of chemical elements and molecules, their rates and thermodynamics. Chemical kinetics, rate laws, collision theory and transition state theory. Reaction and structural dynamic. Thermochemistry, properties of ideal and non-ideal systems. Chemical equilibria.

Synthesis and Characterization (CHM 6730) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Synthetic procedures and methods for preparation of inorganic, organic, and polymeric compounds, with special attention to recent developments. Methods of characterization and identification of chemical compounds, with emphasis on physical methods.

Topics in Chemistry (CHM 6830C) 1-4 credits

Graduate Research (CHM 6918) 1-12 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Supervised research in chemistry. Grading: S/U

Graduate Seminar (CHM 6935) 1 credit
Non-thesis topic.

Graduate Seminar (CHM 6936) 1 credit
Thesis research seminar.

Master's Thesis (CHM 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Advanced Research in Chemistry (CHM 7978) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral candidacy
Focused, relevant research in the student's course of study in the Ph.D. program in chemistry. This course requires oversight by the student's dissertation advisor. Grading: S/U

Dissertation (CHM 7980) 1-12 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral candidacy
Grading: S/U

Chemistry for Environmental Scientists (CHS 6611) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Two semesters college chemistry with lab, graduate standing
Course is designed for environmental scientists and requires minimal chemical training (one year of general chemistry with a "C" or better or permission of instructor). Introductory chemical basics are covered to lay a foundation for the remainder of the course. Atmospheric chemistry (global warming, ozone layer) are covered. However, aquatic chemistry and its effects on biotic communities and humans are emphasized.

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Complex Systems and Brain Sciences


Graduate Courses

Nonlinear Dynamic Systems (ISC 5453) 3 credits
Introduction to nonlinear dynamical systems in an interdisciplinary setting. Topics covered include one-, two- and three-dimensional ordinary differential equations, bifurcations, one- and two-dimensional maps, iterated function systems, time scale separation and self-organization and elementary stochastic systems.

Cognitive Neuroscience (ISC 5465) 3 credits

An interdisciplinary survey of the neural basis of cognitive functions such as perception, attention, memory, and language.

Directed Independent Study (ISC 5908) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Directed independent study in complex systems and brain sciences for undergraduate and graduate students.

Special Topics (ISC 5930) 3 credits
Special topics course in complex systems and brain sciences for both undergraduate and graduate students. Specific title, content, and textbook(s) vary with topic.

Methods in Complex Systems (ISC 6450) 3 credits
Classical statistical analysis and inference of linear systems and how those statistical methods and analysis procedures differ for non-linear complex systems. Topics include fractals, chaos, neural networks, and self-organizing critical systems.

Cognition and Complex Systems (ISC 6452) 3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of perception, action, and cognition. It focuses on empirical methodologies related to development and evaluation of theories of mind. Examples are drawn from psychology, computation, linguistics, neuroscience, and philosophy.

Computational Neuroscience 1 (ISC 6460) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Covers the basics of computational neuroscience and introduces many research topics of both biological and artificial neural networks.

Directed Independent Study (ISC 6908) 1-3 credits
Grading: S/U

Introduction to Complex Systems Tools (ISC 6925) 3 credits
Objective of this "boot camp" is to provide students with the prerequisites-some conceptual background and sufficient working knowledge of mathematics-necessary to master the mathematically-based graduate courses at the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Science.

Special Topics (ISC 6930) 1-3 credits
Discussion of special topics in complex systems and brain sciences.

Seminar in Attention (ISC 6932) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course examines attention and its role in perception, cognition, and action. Students read recent research articles dealing with significant issues in this area.

Proseminar on Research in Complex Systems (ISC 6937) 1-3 credits

Introductory survey course of research in complex systems and brain sciences at Florida Atlantic University, aimed at first semester graduate students.

Advanced Research (ISC 7978) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. degree program
Focused, relevant research in the student's course of study in the Ph.D. degree program in complex systems and brain sciences. This course requires oversight by the student's dissertation advisor. Grading: S/U

Dissertation (ISC 7980) 1-15 credits
Grading: S/U

Dynamical Systems and Chaos 1 (MAP 6211) 3 credits
Dynamical Systems and Chaos 2 (MAP 6212) 3 credits

(See Mathematical Sciences courses, this section)

Developmental Neurobiology (PSB 6515) 3 credits
Neuroscience 1 (PSB 6345) 3 credits
Neuroscience 2 (PSB 6346) 3 credits
Biopsychology of Language (PSB 6809) 3 credits
Special Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience (PSB 6930) 3 credits
Special Topics (PSY 5930) 3 credits

(See Psychology courses, this section)

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Environmental Sciences

This interdisciplinary master's program draws on several disciplines in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science. See the Interdisciplinary Programs section in the College of Science Programs section.

Geosciences


Geography

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Environmental Issues in Atmospheric and Earth Science (ESC 3704) 3 credits
Investigation of the complex interactions between humans and their environment. Environmental problems encompassing selected aspects of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere: including deforestation, desertification, air and water quality, and processes of land degradation.

Environment and Society (EVR 2017) 3 credits
Introduction to the study of major environmental problems and issues confronting modern society: economic and ecosystem concepts, population patterns and dynamics, resource use and misuse, environmental quality, and environmental citizenship. This is a General Education course.

World Geography (GEA 2000) 3 credits
Examination of contemporary world problems through geographical analysis of physical, economic, social, and political systems of major countries and world regions. Credit will not be given for both GEA 2000 and GEA 3003. This is a General Education course.

Geography Study Abroad (GEA 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Geography of the Developing World (GEA 3003) 3 credits
Survey of the physical, economic, political, and social systems that characterize the lesser developed nations of the world. Focus on problems affecting Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and China. Credit will not be given for both GEA 3003 and GEA 2000.

Human-Environment Interactions in South Florida (GEA 4275) 3 credits
This course is for Geography majors and majors in other related fields. Methods covered in previous Geosciences courses are emphasized in a collaborative learning environment. Critical and systematic thinking skills are used in a series of case-study projects.

Geography of Latin American and the Caribbean (GEA 4405) 3 credits
This course explores Latin American and Caribbean environments and peoples. Particular attention is paid to natural regions, culture, colonization, religion, politics, agriculture, art, and globalization. Ideas and concepts are illustrated with PowerPoint presentations and videos.

Geography Study Abroad (GEA 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Introduction to Physical Geography (GEO 2200C) 3 credits
The natural environment and its physical patterns - an introduction to landforms, soils, water, vegetation, and other physical features of the earth. Laboratory work.

World of Wines (GEO 3314) 3 credits
Survey about the complex relationships between wine and Western culture. Topics covered include: great variety of wines from various world regions; quality factors in wines; effects of physical environment; wine history; wine types and their consumption; how to read a wine label; factors that differentiate wine tastes; how wines are produced; roles of wines in modern culture.

Quantitative Methods (GEO 4022) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 2023 or equivalent
Introduction to quantitative methods used in regional, economic and geographic analysis.

Spatial Data Analysis (GEO 4167C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GEO 4022
Designed to help geographers, geologists, earth scientists, and other professionals explore a range of spatial analytical techniques. The emphasis is on the choice and application methods for the analysis of the various types of spatial data that are commonly encountered and analyzed in geographic information systems.

Water Resources (GEO 4280C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GEO 2200C or GLY 2010C or equivalent
Distribution, management, and use of water. Topics include agricultural and personal water use, wetland degradation and pollution.

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Biogeography (GEO 4300) 3 credits
Biogeography is the study of past and present distribution of plants and animals. The course combines the disciplines of biology and ecology with spatial and temporal aspects of geography. Class will be taught through lecture, in-class laboratory sessions with homework assignments, and field trips to local sites.

American Cultural Landscape (GEO 4422) 3 credits
An examination of the cultural, economic and political forces that have given shape to the American landscape.

Tourism and Commercial Recreation (GEO 4542) 3 credits
Geographic analysis of tourism and commercial recreation. Emphasis will be placed on spatial variation in tourist flows and tourism development, and the cultural, environmental, and economic impacts of tourism.

Urban Geography (GEO 4602) 3 credits
Pattern of urban settlements. Types, functional areas, and the influence of distribution upon social, political and economic development. Emphasis on transportation, land use and the planning process.

Transportation and Spatial Organization (GEO 4700) 3 credits
Transportation development, network configuration and allocation of transport flows. Analytical problems.

Directed Independent Study (GEO 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Grading: S/U


Geosciences Honors Colloquium (GEO 4920) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Exposes undergraduate students in the Honors track in Geography to various research topics and methodologies in the geosciences. Lectures given by a variety of speakers in the academic and professional realms of the geosciences. Repeatable for credit.

Special Topics (GEO 4930) 1-3 credits
Specially arranged programs in remote sensing, GIS, and physical or human geography.

Field Experience (GEO 4948C) 1 credit
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing; permission of instructor
Direct observation, description, and analysis of selected field sites and associated topics. Grading: S/U

Introduction to Mapping and GIS (GIS 3015C) 3 credits
Analysis of map properties and use of maps as sources of information. Essentials of location, scale, projection, direction, elevation, and general map elements. Introduction to map making in geographic information systems.

Photogrammetry and Aerial Photograph Interpretation (GIS 4021C) 3 credits
Principles of aerial photography and photogrammetry including the photographic production process, electromagnetic principles, history of aerial photography and aerial platforms, elements of visual image interpretation, and analog and digital (soft copy) photogrammetric methods.

Remote Sensing of the Environment (GIS 4035C) 3 credits
Principles of photographic and electromagnetic remote sensing systems which detect, record and measure distributions of natural and cultural phenomena. Interpretation of aerial and orbital imagery for urban and environmental research and planning.

Digital Image Analysis (GIS 4037C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 4035C or equivalent
Advanced remote sensing covering the analysis of digital satellite imagery of the Earth. Emphasis on the use of computer-based image processing systems.

Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS 4043C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 3015C or equivalent
Basic concepts of geographic information systems. Evaluation of hardware and software components. Examination of data structures, and fundamental GIS functions. Application potential and laboratory experience with selected GIS systems.

Applications in Geographic Information Systems (GIS 4048C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 4043C or equivalent
Advanced technical, implementation and application issues in geographic information systems. Geocoding, algorithms for 2- and 3-dimensional representations, and system planning and implementation issues.

Programming in GIS (GIS 4102C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 4043C or equivalent
The course introduces students to the basic programming concepts and methodologies for customizing and/or extending the available functions in the cutting edge GISystems and the pertinent statistical data analysis methods.

Geovisualization and GIS (GIS 4138C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 3015C or equivalent
Advanced map design with an emphasis on the visualization of spatial data in a virtual environment. Lab projects include animated maps, fly-through animations, and 3D visualizations.

Weather and Climate (MET 2010) 3 credits
Introduction to solar radiation, temperature, moisture and pressure systems of the atmosphere. Examination of the fundamental elements of weather including wind systems and storms. The global distribution of climatic zones. Impact of climate on human activity.This is a General Education course.

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Geography Graduate Courses

Environmental Restoration (EVR 6334) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GEO 4300 or PCB 4043, or permission of instructor
Course introduces students to the rapidly expanding practice of restoring degraded ecosystems and landforms through a mixture of lecture, discussion, field visits, and individual research projects.

Restoration Implementation and Management (EVR 6358) 3 credits
Restoration projects require the approval of multiple government agencies and cooperation of affected landowners and stakeholders at every phase. This course covers the legal aspects of government approval, creating communication plans for coalition building and collaboration with stakeholders, conflict resolution and ethics in restoration. The course uses a combination of discussion of academic literature, lecture, case studies and guest speakers, including from state and federal agencies, consulting firms and non-governmental organizations.

Human-Environmental Interactions (GEA 6277) 3 credits
This course provides graduate students in geography with an environment to practice the various methods and approaches learned in their graduate program. It uses a multidisciplinary approach to explore diverse aspects of human-environment interactions in a specified region.

Biogeography (GEO 5305) 3 credits
Biogeography is the study of distributions of organisms and the processes responsible for the patterns. This course examines theories concerning spatio-temporal processes and patterns, populations, communities, ecosystems, biodiversity, disturbance, succession, speciation and conservation. Classes are taught by lecture, discussion of academic literature and field-based research at local sites.

Geographic Analysis of Population (GEO 5435C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GEO 4022 or equivalent
Examination of theory and method in the geographical analysis of population. Focus on population distribution, its composition and causes, consequences, and projection of change. Mathematical and statistical models.

Seminar in Geographic Methodology (GEO 6117) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GEO 4022 or permission of instructor
Course examines research methodology with emphasis on field-based techniques. Students learn how to proceed from problem identification to hypothesis formation, planning, field sampling, and ultimately, analysis. Field sampling techniques from a cross section of geography are introduced.

Research in the Geosciences (GEO 6118) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in geosciences
An introduction to and overview of research in the geosciences with an emphasis on Department research interests. This seminar is recommended strongly for all beginning geoscience graduate students.

Plants and People (GEO 6317) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Course explores interaction between humans and plants - how people use plants in terms of traditional rural resource use and modern urban use. Topics covered include medicine, food, gardens, agriculture, religion, construction, ornamentation and fuel.

Culture, Conservation, and Land Use (GEO 6337) 3 credits
Course considers relationship between humans and environment with emphasis on current cultural practices and ideologies concerning preservation and consumption from both local and global perspectives. A portion of the course is designed to permit students to reflect on the personal roles all of us play in relation to the ecosystems in which we live.

Seminar in Urban Area Analysis (GEO 6608) 3 credits
An analysis of the distribution, structure, patterns of land use and transportation, economic base, inter- and intra-relationships, and other spatial aspects of urban phenomena. Emphasis upon modern data acquisition techniques, quantitative analysis and measurement, and graphical methods of analysis and presentation. Content will vary; may be repeated.

Directed Independent Study (GEO 6908) 1-3 credits
Individually formulated research project pursued under the direction of a staff member competent in the particular phase of geographic study. Physical parameters, theories and applications of photography, radar, thermal infrared and other data-gathering systems will be investigated. Conversion of data for cartographic or computer graphics display will be studied. Content will vary (no more than 3 credits may be applied to the minimum degree requirements).

Graduate Research (GEO 6918) 1-12 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Supervised research in the geosciences. Grading: S/U

Geosciences Colloquium Series (GEO 6920) 1 credit
This course is designed to help incoming graduate students develop an awareness of and an appreciation for the multiple research perspectives/approaches that can be brought to studies in geosciences. It is organized around presentations in the Department's colloquium series, which showcases geoscience-related research by faculty and graduate students in and outside the Department. Grading: S/U

Seminar in Special Topics in Regional or Systematic Geography (GEO 6938) 3 credits
A study of selected topics that are central to the advanced study of geography: construction, analysis, and synthesis of regional systems. It includes techniques, methodology, and procedures for defining and solving problems of a geographic nature and involves case study illustrations. Specific content will vary.

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Master's Thesis (GEO 6971) 1-6 credits
Original investigation leading to scholarly analysis of a significant geographic topic in the area of specialization which will be supervised by a major professor and a graduate committee. Grading: S/U

Advanced Research (GEO 7978) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Doctoral students only
Dissertation related research prior to taking the candidacy exam. May be repeated in subsequent semesters.

Dissertation (GEO 7980) 1-9 credits

Prerequisite: Doctoral students only
Dissertation related research taken after passing the candidacy exam.

Digital Image Analysis (GIS 5033C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 4035C or GIS 5038C
Course is the second in a three-course sequence that follows the national model for core curriculum in remote sensing. Digital techniques for processing and analyzing remotely sensed imagery include image enhancement, image classification, ground truthing, and accuracy assessment.

Remote Sensing of the Environment (GIS 5038C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 3015C
The first of a three-course sequence, this one covers principles and concepts of remote sensing, aerial photograph and satellite image interpretation and analysis. Includes a survey of remote sensing data sources, hands on lab projects in a GIS environment and an introductory research project.

Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS 5051C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 3015C or equivalent
Basic concepts of geographic information systems. Evaluation of hardware and software components. Examination of data structures and fundamental GIS functions. Application potential and laboratory experience with GIS systems. Basic GIS project design and implementation.

Applications in Geographic Information Systems (GIS 5100C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 4043C or GIS 5051C or equivalent
Advanced techniques for raster modeling, network systems, and statistical analysis in geographic information systems. System planning and implementation issues in applying GIS in diverse areas. GIS-based spatial modeling issues.

Programming in Geographic Information Systems (GIS 5103C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GIS 4043C or 5051C
Course covers basic computer programming concepts and methodologies. Issues for customizing and/or extending available functions in selected cutting edge GIS are discussed along with advanced geoprocessing modeling and data analysis with scripts. Project design and development are addressed.

LiDAR Remote Sensing and Applications (GIS 6032C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GIS 5051C; Geosciences graduate students only
Introduces LiDAR principles, sensors and platforms, data processing and analysis and applications. Students master basic skills of LiDAR needed to leverage the commercial LiDAR sources and information products in a broad range of applications.

Advanced Remote Sensing (GIS 6039) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GEO 4022 and GIS 4035C or permission of instructor
Advanced study of remote sensing applications. Project design, implementation and evaluation.

Topics in Geoinformation Science (GIS 6120) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GEO 4022 and GIS 4043C or equivalent
Technical, operational, and management issues in geographic information systems. Examination of GIS function algorithms, data structures, error analysis, and other topics in GIS applications.

Hyperspectral Remote Sensing (GIS 6127) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GIS 4035C and 4037C or GIS 5033C and 5038C
Course introduces state-of-the-art techniques for the processing and interpretation of hyper- and ultraspectral data with a focus on thematic information extraction from airborne and satellite-based hyperspectral sensors. Course covers the full hyperspectral remote sensing processing chain from data acquisition and calibration to image processing and thematic mapping.

Spatial Data Analysis (GIS 6306) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GIS 5051C
Introduces a range of spatial statistical methods commonly used in the analysis of geo-spatial data in GISciences. Emphasis on gaining insight into the overall framework for analysis and developing an understanding of various concepts with in-depth treatment of select techniques. Methods are mainly discussed within the context of GIS technology.

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Geology

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

The Blue Planet (ESC 2070) 3 credits
Survey introduction to earth system science with an emphasis on the interactions between earth, ocean and atmosphere. Special attention will be paid to greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, and global change. Course is oriented to students not majoring in science. This is a General Education course.

Physical Geology/Evolution of the Earth (GLY 2010C) 4 credits
Covers environmental and physical geology, how planet Earth works and the role of humans in sustaining the natural environment. Designed to convey the excitement of recent geologic discoveries and evaluate concerns in the news about diminishing resources, natural hazards and the fate of the Earth. Emphasis is on the applications of geology and its influence on contemporary trends in business, education, engineering, social science and the humanities. Slide-illustrated lectures. This is a General Education course.

The History of the Earth and Life (GLY 2100) 3 credits
An introduction to historical geology. The study of ancient continents and life forms, with special emphasis on the geologic history of the North American continent. This is a General Education course.

Geology Study Abroad (GLY 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study programs.

Geology of Florida (GLY 3155C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 2010C or equivalent
General review of the geological evolution of Florida from the Paleozoic to the recent. Emphasis is given to the local geomorphology and stratigraphy, and to evolution, extinction, and systematics of the major fossils. Also discussed are theories on the origin of the Everglades, fossil and living coral reef tracts, and the regional hydrogeology. Lecture, laboratory and field studies.

Water, Waves, and Caves: The Geologic Formation of National Parks and Monuments (GLY 3165) 3 credits
Discussion of physical and historical geological features of selected national parks and monuments of the United States formed primarily by the action of water. Introduces students with no geological background to those aspects of geology that are readily observable, but are often missed.

Paleontology (GLY 3603C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GLY 2100 and an introductory biology course
An introduction to the study of fossil plants and animals. Emphasis will be placed on the taxonomy and classification of major plant and animal phyla represented as fossils, and on the evolution of life as shown by the fossil record. Lecture, laboratory and field studies.

Coastal and Marine Science (GLY 3730) 3 credits
Introduction to the study of coastal and marine environments, particularly as they are related to human use and management of biophysical resources. Focuses on materials and dynamic processes of ocean basins, sediments, and seawater; including ocean-climate linkage, greenhouse effect, and sea-level change.

Cooperative Education - Geology (GLY 3949) 1-3 credits
Grading: S/U

Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry (GLY 4200C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: GLY 2010C, CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, PHY 2043
Discussion of elementary crystallography and symmetry, chemical bonding and the physical and chemical properties of minerals. Crustal distribution of elements, mineral associations and vein minerals. Identification of minerals using their physical and chemical properties. Discussion of x-ray mineralogy, chemical equilibrium and the phase rule. Lecture and laboratory.

Environmental Geochemistry (GLY 4241) 3 credits
Prerequisites: One semester of college chemistry
Examination of current geochemical problems affecting the earth at global, regional, and local scales. Discussion of the natural geochemical background of substances including a review of geochemical principles.

Petrology of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks (GLY 4310C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 4200C
The identification of the rock-forming minerals in thin sections. Rock textures and the interpretation of the origin and later geological history of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Discussion of chemical equilibria, and the phase rule. Laboratory investigation of selected rock samples. Lecture and laboratory.

Structural Geology (GLY 4400C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 2010C
Structural features of the earth's crust and the deformational forces responsible. Structural aspects of rock mechanics. Applications to mineral exploration and mining, hydrogeology, and engineering geology. Lecture and laboratory.

Solid Earth Geophysics (GLY 4451) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2311, MAC 2312, PHY 2043, PHY 2044
Corequisite: Enrolled in Geosciences or related discipline

Course gives an introduction to the fundamental principles of each major branch of geophysics: seismology, gravitation, magnetism, and electrical and thermal properties. Emphasis is given to geodynamics and plate tectonics.

Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (GLY 4500C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 2010C and GLY 2100
An introduction to sediments, sedimentary processes, and the stratigraphic record. Focus will be on methods of stratigraphic analysis, transport and deposition of sedimentary environments, and types and compositions of sedimentary rocks. Lecture and laboratory.

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Geomorphology (GLY 4700C) 3 credits

An introductory study of landscapes, how they formed in response to earth-building and erosional processes and their relationship to underlying geology. Applications of landform analysis to geological mapping, mineral and petroleum exploration, geological and ocean engineering. Global landscapes. Slide illustrated lectures and laboratory.

Field Methods (GLY 4750C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GIS 3015C and introductory geology or physical geography
Introduction to field methods in geology. Geologic survey techniques, GPS, air photo interpretation, description and sampling of rock outcrops, and report writing. Includes an out-of-state field trip (typically in the southeastern U.S.) plus several weekend trips to southern Florida localities. A fee is charged for field trips in addition to regular registration fees for this course. Lecture and field activities.

Field Camp (GLY 4790) 6 credits
Prerequisite: Approval by Department's undergraduate committee
Exercises in field mapping, air photo interpretation, stratigraphic analysis, structural and hydrologic problems. The camp is held in the Durango, Colorado, area during mid-May to mid-June (summer term A). In addition to the University's standard credit registration fees, a separate camp fee is charged. For 2001 the fee was $1300. Food and other personal expenses are additional.

Hydrogeology (GLY 4822) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 2010C, MAC 2311, and CHM 2045 or permission of instructor
Strong environmental emphasis. Analytical study of the principles and applications of ground and surface water flow. Quantitative prediction of leachate attenuation. Flow net theory. Well hydraulics. Water quality, management and legislation.

Engineering Geology (GLY 4830) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GLY 2010C and MAC 1147 or MAC 1140, and MAC 1114
Geology's significance in the design, location, and construction of engineering structures.

Introduction to Hydrogeology Modeling and Aquifer Test (GLY 4832C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GLY 4822 or equivalent
Basic concepts of simulation and classification of models used in hydrology, hydraulic and hydrogeology systems. Evaluation of methods of analysis of the hydroecologic process and aquifer tests. Hands on computer experience.

Directed Independent Study (GLY 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisites: Requires prior arrangement with faculty member
Grading: S/U

Special Topics (GLY 4930C) 1-3 credits
Specially arranged programs in geology.

Field Experience (GLY 4948C) 1 credit
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing; permission of instructor
Direct observation, description, and analysis of selected field sites and associated topics. Grading: S/U

Geology Study Abroad (GLY 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study programs.

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Geology Graduate Courses

Earth Science for Educators 1 (ESC 6206) 3 credits
Analysis of the impact of Earth system phenomena (e.g., ice sheet melting, volcanic eruptions, stratospheric ozone depletion, etc.) on the Earth's spheres. Investigation of interconnections between environmental events and Earth's spheres using a jigsaw cooperative learning approach. Includes the development of jigsaw classroom applications in Earth system science.

Environmental Geochemistry (GLY 5243) 3 credits
Prerequisite: One year of college chemistry
Examination of current geochemical problems affecting the earth at global, regional, and local scales. Discussion of the natural geochemical background of substances including a review of geochemical principles.

Shore Erosion and Protection (GLY 5575C) 3 credits
Study of geomorphology and use of coasts, sediment budgets and dune-beach interaction, effects of engineering structures, coastal hydraulics, tides and currents, waves and structures, coastal water level fluctuations, shore erosion control, beach replenishment, coastal protection and restoration, fate of replenished beaches.

Marine Geology (GLY 5736C) 3 credits
Theoretical and applied earth science in the marine environment. Introduction to the history of marine geology, structure and evolution of continental margins and the worlds basins in terms of modern plate tectonic theory, ocean sediments and sedimentary regimes, geologic effects of waves and currents, dynamics of coastal environmental processes, fluctuations of mean sea level through time, ocean mineral resources.

Advanced Topics in Applied, Coastal, and Hydrogeology (GLY 5934) 3 credits
Occasional advanced courses in specialized areas of engineering, coastal and hydrogeology not fully covered in other program courses.

Advanced Environmental Geochemistry (GLY 6246) 3 credits
A study of the principles of geochemistry as they are applied to environmental problems relating to water. Hydrogeology includes study of contamination of surface and underground terrestrial water and coastal waters. The course will familiarize students with the methods, capabilities, and jargon of geochemistry as it applies to their areas of interest.

Comparative Carbonate Sedimentology (GLY 6352) 3 credits
Prerequisites: GLY 2010C, GLY 2100, GLY 3603C, GLY 4200C, GLY 4500C, GLY 4750C, GLY 4790, GLY 3730, CHM 2045 (or equivalents) and/or permission of instructor
Dedicated to the study of carbonate deposits in the process of formation, methods of studies, examination of sediment types and factors that control their distribution and tracking depositional environments, rocks and calcareous organisms into the recent geologic past (Pleistocene and Holocene).
(New course effective spring 2015.)

Environmental Geophysics (GLY 6457) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geology or related discipline or permission of instructor
An introduction to near-surface geophysical methods for mapping the ground at shallow depths. Emphasis on electromagnetic and electrical methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and resistivity imaging specifically for environmental applications. A field-based case study using an integrated array of real geophysical data sets collected in a local site will be conducted to give students a practical approach to applied geophysical methods.

Paleoecology (GLY 6661C) 3 credits
Overview of the principles of ecology as applicable in the fossil record, including trophic structure and biotic interactions, paleobiogeography, catastrophism, and implications in evolutionary theory. Lecture and laboratory.

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Regolith Geology (GLY 6707) 3 credits
Surveys the occurrence and distribution of surficial materials as they exist at the surface of the Earth in relation to parent materials, topography, drainage, climate, and time of formation. Emphasis is placed on subdivision of the soil (weathering) mantle in terms of soil stratigraphy, soil classification, maps and mapping units, and the application of remote sensing techniques. Soil resources are related to weathering and erosion via discussion of theories of landscape development, geochemical weathering processes, paleoclimates, and micromorphology of regoliths. Ancient soils (paleosols) and superimposed weathering profiles are discussed with reference to principles and practices of paleopedology, resource management, and interpretation of ancient environments.

Coastal Environments (GLY 6737) 3 credits
Examination of the biophysical framework and biogeography (zonation) of world coastal environments. Consideration of the areal (spatial) distribution of major coastal ecosystems and the natural processes and littoral materials that make up beaches, dunes, wetlands, tidal flats, rocky shores, and other coastal landforms.

Ancient Marine Environments (GLY 6745) 3 credits
Focuses on methods used to recognize ancient marine environments from the stratigraphic record and investigates changes in deep-sea sedimentation and sedimentary overlap sequences on continental margins. Considers courses of climatic change and evaluates methods of paleoenvironmental analysis as they relate to better understanding of oceans, climate sea-level fluctuations and geodynamic processes.

Global Environmental Change (GLY 6746) 3 credits
An introduction to the study of global climate change through time. Included and in-depth studies of the causes of and evidence for past environmental changes, major perturbations of global natural environmental systems, the effects of sea level changes, solar variations, and planetary dynamics on climate, and details of Quaternary paleoclimate models.

Groundwater Solute Transport Modeling (GLY 6828) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 6836 or equivalent
Studies the mechanisms that govern the movement of water and pollutants in aquifers. Develops a complete conceptual model and overviews a sound mathematical model of flow and pollution in saturated aquifers, including the relevant processes and internal relations, and identifies their parameters. Introduction of numerical methods. Uses documented analytical and numerical models for the solution of groundwater flow with solute. Extensive hands-on experience on PC and Workstation.

Modeling Groundwater Movement (GLY 6836) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 4832C or equivalent
Focuses on hydrogeologic modeling, considers groundwater flow space and time scale, and surface-ground waters interaction. Evaluates methods of analysis for the rainfall-runoff process, evapotranspiration and soil moisture, deep percolation, river-aquifer interaction and flow routing, and catchment basin modeling. Construction of the conceptual groundwater model, defining the mathematical solution, and application of the numerical method of solution. Surveys numerical methods. Overviews the parameter identification. Uses documented numerical models and computer codes for the solution of groundwater problems. Extensive hands-on experience on PC and Workstation.

Methods in Hydrogeology (GLY 6838) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 4822 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor
Designed to introduce students to practical aspects of hydrogeology, including project design, field methods and data analysis.

Coastal Hazards (GLY 6888) 3 credits
A global review of natural and human-induced hazards as they affect coastal zones, including the identification of site specific and regional coastal hazards. Mitigation and management are related to individual and community hazard perceptions, risk assessment and response. Emphasis is placed on the susceptibility of the SE Florida region to oil (chemical) spills, coastal floods due to extreme events, and to the potential impacts of global sea level rise.

Benchmark Developments in Hydrogeology (GLY 6897) 3 credits
Prerequisite: GLY 4822 or permission of instructor
This seminar examines changes in humans' understanding of groundwater through time beginning with ancient uses of groundwater, continuing through the present and ending with projections about the future of hydrogeologic research. Students will solidify their knowledge of the fundamental principles of hydrogeology and will broaden their understanding of the history and philosophy of science.

Directed Independent Study (GLY 6908) 1-3 credits
Faculty supervised directed independent study. Grading: S/U

Thesis Seminar (GLY 6931) 3 credits
Methods, procedures and policies for preparing, presenting, defending, and completion of a thesis or dissertation. Focus on the framework and scientific style for scholarly reports and composition. Consideration of title; abstract; introduction; data selection, correlation and arrangement; methods and experiment; results; discussion; summaries; and conclusions. Practica provide weekly experience to steps in thesis preparation.

Special Topics in Applied Geology (GLY 6934) 1-4 credits
Occasional special topics and courses in specialized areas of coastal geology, hydrogeology, engineering geology and environmental geology.

Master's Thesis (GLY 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

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Interdisciplinary Studies


Undergraduate Courses

Introduction to Animal Science (ANS 3006C) 4 credits

Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 1010L, 1011, 1011L and CHM 2045, 2045L, 2046, 2046L
Overview of nutrition, physiology, genetics, growth and development related to the equine, beef, swine, dairy, aquatic and poultry industries. Overview of the farm animal, poultry and aquatic industries. Lab consists of relevant field experiences in these industries.


Premed Success (IDS 3122) 2 credits

Prerequisites: 8 credits of general biology and chemistry
Designed to help pre-health professional students (medical, dental, pharmacy, veterinary, etc.) negotiate the complex and often confusing world of medical school applications, admission tests, admission essays, interviews, financing medical school and much more. The scope of this course can be expanded to fit student needs and interests.

Basic Clinical Skills for Pre-Health Students (IDS 3125) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Minimum overall GPA of 3.0
Provides students with basic clinical skills that will ensure more meaningful medical experiences (through shadowing or volunteering) prior to entering a health-related graduate program. Students are introduced to medical professionalism and gain basic medical knowledge through training on blood borne pathogens, vital signs, CPR, HIPAA, EKGs and taking patient histories.

Medical Shadowing Internship (IDS 3940) 1 credit
Prerequisites: IDS 3125 and a minimum GPA of 3.0
Designed for students interested in becoming healthcare professionals such as medical doctors, dentists, pharmacists and veterinarians. Students explore the medical field by shadowing selected healthcare professionals in a variety of settings and observing their daily activities, obtaining limited hands-on experience. The scope of this course can be expanded to fit student needs and interests. May be repeated for credit for up to six semesters.

Directed Independent Study (IDS 4906) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Study of topics relating to the special needs and interests of individual students. Grading: S/U

Special topics (IDS 4934) 1-3 credits
Special topics of interest to science students.

Current Issues in Biomedicine (ISC 1430) 1 credit
Course is designed for pre-health profession freshmen who participate in the Freshman Learning Communities. This course is an introduction to current/controversial issues in the medical field that helps students understand the innovations on the horizon in medicine. Students will leave the course more knowledgeable about cutting-edge research in biomedicine and the various career paths in this field.

Introduction to Preprofessional Studies (PCB 3083) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 8 credits general chemistry, 8 credits general biology, permission of instructor
Corequisite: PCB 3083L

To familiarize premedical or allied field students with the requirements, demands and rewards of a career in medicine. The course features lectures about a variety of medical disciplines.

Introduction to Preprofessional Studies Lab (PCB 3083L) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Corequisite: PCB 3083
Shadowing of physicians in hospital and office settings, including visits to local facilities and observations of actual medical procedures. Grading: Pass/fail option.

Mathematical Sciences


Courses offered by the Department of Mathematical Sciences may require the use of a calculator or computer software. Mathematics majors may not count mathematics courses taken as "pass/fail" as part of their program. Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Mathematics Placement Exam: All entering freshmen, as well as entering transfer students with no prior college-level course work in mathematics, are required to take an online exam to determine placement in their first mathematics course at FAU. Students may take the exam multiple times, with the highest score used to determine placement. There is a nominal charge for the exam, which the students can pay for by credit card from home. It is highly recommended that entering transfer students with prior college-level course work in mathematics but who need additional mathematics courses also take the exam, though it is not a requirement. For more information, visit here.

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Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Cryptography and Information Security (CIS 4362) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 2103 and MAD 2502
Classical cryptology, entropy. Stream and block ciphers. Public-key versus symmetric cryptography, one-way and trap-door functions. Primality and factorization, DLP, Diffie-Hellman, RSA and ElGamal cryptosystems. Issues of computer and network security. Secure protocols, identification, authentication, digital signatures, secret sharing schemes.

* Modern Analysis (MAA 4200) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2313 and MAD 2104
Basic properties of real numbers. Functions. Limits and properties of continuous functions. Differential calculus.

* Introductory Analysis 1 (MAA 4226) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAA 4200
Course covers real and complex numbers, metric spaces, sequences and series, continuity, differentiation and integration of functions of one or more real variables.

* Introductory Analysis 2 (MAA 4227) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAA 4226
Continuation of Introductory Analysis 1. Course covers real and complex numbers, metric spaces, sequences and series, continuity, differentiation and integration of functions of one or more real variables.

* Introductory Complex Analysis (MAA 4402) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2313
An introduction to complex analysis, analytic functions, Taylor series, Cauchy's theorem. Calculus of residues. Recommended for engineering and science majors.

* College Algebra (MAC 1105) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or MGF 1106 or MGF 1107

Linear and quadratic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, polynomial functions and equations, complex numbers, rational exponents and radicals, matrices and determinants, exponential and logarithmic functions. This is a General Education course.

* Trigonometry (MAC 1114) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 1105

Theory of trigonometric functions and their inverses, graphs, identities and conditional equations, solutions of triangles, complex numbers and polar representation. Additional topics as time permits. This is a General Education course.

* Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 1105

Recommended Corequisite: MAC 1114
Polynomial, rational, and other algebraic functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; piecewise-defined functions. Properties and graphs of functions. Polynomial and rational inequalities. Conic sections. Matrices and determinants. Sequences and series. Mathematical induction. Binomial theorem. Applications. This is a General Education course.

* Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry (MAC 1147) 4 or 5 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 1105

Polynomial, rational, and other algebraic functions; trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; piecewise-defined functions. Properties and graphs of functions. Polynomial and rational inequalities. Trigonometric identities. Conditional trigonometric equations. Conic sections. Solutions of triangles. Vector algebra. Parametric equations. Polar coordinates. Matrices and determinants. Sequences and series. Mathematical induction. Binomial theorem. Applications. This is a General Education course.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Methods of Calculus (MAC 2233) 3 credits

Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 1105

A descriptive and intuitive introduction to the methods and applications of differentiation and integration. Primarily for social science and business administration majors. This is a General Education course.

* Calculus for Engineers 1 (MAC 2281) 4 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisites: MAC 1147, or both MAC 1140 and MAC 1114

Development of an engineering skill set. Topics include continuity, differentiability, differential approximations, optimization, curve sketching, transcendental and inverse functions, mean value theorem, and L'Hopital's Rule. Introduction to integration. This is a General Education course.

* Calculus for Engineers 2 (MAC 2282) 4 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 2281 or MAC 2311

Continuation of MAC 2281; continued development of an engineering skill set. Topics include techniques of integration, partial fractions, area, volume, work, trapezoid, Simpson's Rules, analytic geometry, polar representation of complex numbers, Taylor approximations, sequences, and series.
This is a General Education course.

* Calculus with Analytic Geometry 1 (MAC 2311) 4 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisites: MAC 1147, or both MAC 1140 and MAC 1114

Continuity, differentiability, differential approximation, optimization and curve sketching of functions and inverse functions of a single variable, including treatment of trigonometric functions. Mean value theorem and L'Hopital's Rule. Introduction to integration. This is a General Education course.

* Calculus with Analytic Geometry 2 (MAC 2312) 4 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 2281 or MAC 2311

Continuation of MAC 2311. Logarithmic, Exponential, hyperbolic, and inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, partial fractions, area, trapezoid and Simpson's rules, volume, work; analytic geometry; Taylor approximations; sequences and series; polar representation of complex numbers. This is a General Education course.

* Calculus with Analytic Geometry 3 (MAC 2313) 4 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312
Vector space, inner product, length, cross product, curves in space; functions of several variables: differentiability, gradient, tangent planes, differential approximation, surfaces, optimization with constraints, multiple integrals, theorems of Green, Stokes and Gauss.

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* Discrete Mathematics (MAD 2104) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or higher

A proof-oriented approach to and applications of propositional logic, sets, functions, relations, combinatorics, graphs and trees.

* Introduction to Computational Mathematics (MAD 2502) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2281 or MAC 2311

An introduction to mathematical computation by means of algorithmically solving a number of mathematical problems. Introduction to C++. The emphasis will be on the mathematical algorithms involved with problems from analysis, number theory, combinatorics, algebra, linear algebra, numerical analysis and probability.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Numerical Methods (MAD 3400) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312, and some programming experience (not available for students with credit for MAD 4401)
An introductory course in scientific computation for engineering and science students. Topics covered include numerical errors, roots of equations, curve fitting, matrix methods, numerical integration, solution of differential equations and graphic output.

* Graph Theory (MAD 4301) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAD 2104 and MAS 2103
A first course in theory and applications of graphs including basic properties; coloration; algebraic and geometric aspects; enumeration; algorithms; network flows.

* Numerical Analysis 1 (MAD 4401) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2313, MAP 2302, MAS 2103 and some programming experience
Floating point arithmetic, interpolations, approximations, differentiation and integration, linear and non-linear systems of equations, differential equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, error analysis and norms. This course emphasizes theory. (Not available for students with credit for MAD 3400.)

* Numerical Analysis 2 (MAD 4402) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2313, MAP 2302, MAS 2103, and one of either MAD 4401 or MAD 3400
Continuation of topics introduced in MAD 4401.

* Introduction to Coding Theory (MAD 4605) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 2103 and STA 4442 or equivalent
Introduction to the theory of Error Correcting Codes. Binary symmetric channel, probability of error, finite fields, linear codes, standard array, maximum likelihood decoding, sphere packing, Plotkin and other bounds, Hamming codes, Perfect codes, BCH codes, Dual codes, the Krawtchouk polynomials, and MacWilliams' theorem.

Topics in Mathematics for Teachers (MAE 1935) 1-3 credits

Topics in Mathematics for Teachers (MAE 3935) 1-3 credits

* Differential Equations 1 (MAP 2302) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312

An introduction to ordinary differential equations stressing basic techniques and applications.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Engineering Mathematics 1 (MAP 3305) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312
Complex numbers, matrices, determinants, systems of equations, diagonalization, first and second order linear differential equations and systems thereof, including power series solutions.

* Actuarial Mathematics 1 (MAP 4172) 3 credits
Prerequisites: (MAC 2311 or MAC 2281), (MAC 2312 or MAC 2282), MAC 2313, and STA 4442
The course covers concepts from calculus and probability as they pertain to actuarial sciences. It covers differential equations, parameterized curves, general probability, Bayes' theorem, and univariate and multivariate probability distributions. Grading: Pass/fail option

* Actuarial Mathematics 2 (MAP 4173) 3 credits
Prerequisites: ECO 2023 and RMI 3011
Interest theory (discrete and continuous), mathematics underlying economics and finance. Grading: Pass/fail option

* Differential Equations 2 (MAP 4303) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAP 2302
Further techniques in ordinary differential equations and an introduction to partial differential equations.

* Engineering Mathematics 2 (MAP 4306) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2313 and one of either MAP 3305 or MAP 2302
Frobenius method, partial differential equations of physics and engineering. Boundary value, initial value, Sturm-Liouville problems, Laplace transforms.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

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Internship in Actuarial Sciences (MAP 4945) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Supervised internships individually assigned to accommodate students' professional development in the actuarial field. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

* Matrix Theory (MAS 2103) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2233 or MAC 2281 or MAC 2311
Vectors and vector spaces. Linear transformation and matrices. Rank and determinants. Systems of linear equations. Diagonalization. Characteristic values.

Introductory Number Theory (MAS 3203) 3 credits
The basic theory of divisibility and congruences. The theorems of Fermat, Euler and Wilson. Quadratic residues.

* Linear Algebra 2 (MAS 4107) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 2103 or Linear Algebra 1
Vector spaces, complex numbers, basis and dimension, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Cayley-Hamilton theorem, Jordan normal form, and other topics.

* Modern Algebra (MAS 4301) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAD 2104
Elementary number theory. Groups, rings and ideals, polynomials, and fields.

* Introductory Abstract Algebra 1 (MAS 4304) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 4301
Course covers basic structures of abstract and linear algebra, such as groups, rings and ideals, polynomials and factorization, vector spaces and modules, linear transformations, and the classical Galois theory of fields.

* Introductory Abstract Algebra 2 (MAS 4306) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 4304
A continuation of Introductory Abstract Algebra 1. Course covers basic structures of abstract and linear algebra, such as groups, rings and ideals, polynomials and factorization, vector spaces and modules,, linear transformations, and the classical Galois theory of fields.

Intermediate Algebra (MAT 1033) 3 credits
Prerequisite: High school algebra
Preparation for entry level university mathematics courses. Topics include properties of and operations on real numbers, scientific notation, linear equations and inequalities, polynomial and rational expressions, exponents and radicals, products and factoring, quadratic equations, and graphing.

University Honors Seminar in Mathematics (MAT 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in mathematics.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Topics in Mathematics (MAT 1931) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Topics of interest to lower-division students.

Topics in Mathematics (MAT 1932) 1-3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Corequisite: MAC 1105

Topics of interest to lower-division students.

University Honors Seminar in Mathematics (MAT 1935) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in mathematics.

Mathematics Study Abroad (MAT 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Cooperative Education - Mathematics (MAT 3949) 1-2 credits
Grading: S/U

Directed Independent Study (MAT 4906) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Study of topics relating to the special needs and interests of individual students.

Special Topics (MAT 4930) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Lectures on specialized topics.

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* Mathematical Problem Solving (MAT 4937) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAD 2104, MAS 2103, (MAC 2312 or MAC 2282), and (suggested) MAD 2502
Miscellany of challenging mathematical problems not usually met in the standard courses.

Mathematics Study Abroad (MAT 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

* Honors Thesis in Mathematics (MAT 4970) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAA 4200, MAS 4301 and permission of instructor
Supervised research and writing of the honors thesis.

* Mathematics for Liberal Arts 1 (MGF 1106) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or MGF 1107 or MAC 1105
Systematic counting, probability, statistics, history of mathematics, geometry, sets, logic. This is a General Education course.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Mathematics for Liberal Arts 2 (MGF 1107) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or MGF 1106 or MAC 1105 with grade of "C" or better or suitable placement score

Financial mathematics, linear and exponential growth, history of mathematics, elementary number theory, voting techniques, graph theory. This is a General Education course.

* Mathematical Logic (MHF 3302) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHI 2102 or MAD 2104 or MAS 2103 or permission of instructor
An introduction to mathematical logic from a contemporary point of view with an eye toward
its applications in philosophy, computer science and linguistics.

* History of Mathematics (MHF 3404) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAD 2104
Chronological study of the evolution of mathematical thought from primitive counting to modern ideas up to the 21st century.

* Survey of Geometry (MTG 3212) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAD 2104
Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Introduction to projective geometry and the geometry of transformations.

Topics in Geometry (MTG 4930) 1-4 credits
Topics in geometry chosen from Euclidean Geometry, Projective Geometry, Geometry of the Complex Plane, Hyperbolic Geometry, Finite Geometries, Automorphism Groups, Riemannian Geometry, Fractal Geometry, Combinatorial Geometry, Computational Geometry, or other areas of current interest.

University Honors Seminar in Statistics (STA 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in statistics.

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*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Topics in Statistics (STA 1932) 1-3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Topics of interest to lower-division students.

* Introductory Statistics (STA 2023) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or MGF 1106 or MAC 2233

An introductory course covering descriptive statistics, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions and hypothesis tests, and sampling procedures. Laboratory required. This is a General Education course.

Statistics Study Abroad (STA 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Intermediate Statistics Laboratory (STA 3163L) 1 credit
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: STA 3163 or PSY 3234
Computer organization, computer implementation of basic and intermediate statistical inferences that include describing data, graphic presentation, analysis of data. Applications will reflect the descriptive and statistical inferences appropriate to the discipline under which this course is offered (e.g., business, education, engineering, mathematics, psychology, etc.).

* Introduction to Biostatistics (STA 3173) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2233 with a grade a "C" or better
Introduces basic statistical concepts and procedures that are necessary to conduct statistical analysis for biological researchers. The topics covered are probabilistic foundations, experimental designs and their analyses, summarizing and visualizing data, inferential statistics, including hypothesis tests and regression modeling.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Cooperative Education - Statistics (STA 3949) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Grading: S/U

* Probability and Statistics for Engineers (STA 4032) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312
Basic concepts of probability; random variables; discrete and continuous probability distributions; functions of random variables; estimation theory; tests of hypotheses.

* Computational Statistics 1 (STA 4102) 3 credits
Prerequisites: (MAC 2312 or MAC 2282), STA 2023 or higher, and some programming experience
Computer algorithms for evaluation, simulation and visualization, random number generation, sampling from prescribed distributions. Simulations, graphics for data display, computation of probabilities and percentiles, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and multiple regression.

* Computational Statistics 2 (STA 4103) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4102
Continuation of topics introduced in STA 4102.

* Applied Statistics 1 Lab (STA 4202L) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MAC 2313; Corequisite: STA 4234

* Planning Investigations (STA 4222) 3 credits
Prerequisites: STA 4234, and one of MAC 2282 or 2312
Basic concepts of experimental design: randomized blocks, Latin squares, incomplete blocks, factorial designs, fractional factorials, nested designs. Introduction to design of sample surveys: simple random, stratified, cluster sampling; complex designs; ratio and regression estimation; enumerative versus analytical surveys. Student project required.

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* Applied Statistics 1 (STA 4234) 2 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4442; Corequisite: STA 4202L
Point and interval estimation, hypothesis tests, non-parametric procedures, contingency tables. Essential distribution theory. Linear models, including multiple regression and analysis of variance. Emphasis on data analysis, statistical graphics, and diagnostics via personal computing.

* Probability and Statistics 1 (STA 4442) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312
An introductory course treating combinatorics, probability spaces, laws of large numbers, and central limit theorem. An introduction to Markov processes, information theory and applications.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Probability and Statistics 2 (STA 4443) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4442
Properties of test statistics, estimation and testing, linear models, contingency tables; topics from non-parametric statistics, design of experiments or methods of inference.

* Linear Programming and Game Theory (STA 4618) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 2103
Dantzig's simplex method. Duality. Convexity and optimal strategies. Applications.

* Applied Statistics 2 (STA 4702) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4234
Multivariate statistical methods, including the multivariate normal distribution, component analysis, factor analysis, multivariate analysis of variance and regression, discriminant analysis, and causal modeling. Students will use SAS and/or SPSS statistical software.

Applied Time Series and Forecasting (STA 4853) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4234 or equivalent
Gives a basic introduction to time series and forecasting methods that can be applied to finance, economics, engineering and the natural and social sciences. Topics covered include stationary processes, ARMA models, modeling and forecasting with ARMA processes, spectral analysis and non-stationary and seasonal time series models.

Directed Independent Study (STA 4906) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Study of topics relating to the special needs and interests of individual students.

Special Topics (STA 4930 ) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Topics of interest to upper-division students.

Statistics Study Abroad (STA 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

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Mathematical Sciences Graduate Courses

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Multivariable Analysis (MAA 5105) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAA 4200, MAS 4107
Derivative of a function of several variables, implicit and inverse function theorems, submanifolds of Euclidean space, rank theorem, tangent spaces, the derivative as a linear transformation, differential forms, integration on manifolds, Stoke's Theorem.

* Introductory Analysis 1 (MAA 5228) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAA 4200 or permission of instructor
Metric space topology, uniform convergence, Arzela-Ascoli theorem, differentiation and integration of single variable functions, power series, Stone-Weierstrass Theorem, measure theory, Lebesgue integral, convergence theorems for the Lebesgue integral, absolute continuity, the fundamental theorem of calculus.

* Introductory Analysis 2 (MAA 5229) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAA 5228
Continuation of topics in MAA 5228. Metric space topology, uniform convergence, Arzela-Ascoli theorem, differentiation and integration of single variable functions, power series, Stone-Weierstrass Theorem, measure theory, Lebesgue integral, convergence theorems for the Lebesgue integral, absolute continuity, the fundamental theorem of calculus.

Real Analysis 1 (MAA 6306) 3 credits

Complex Analysis 1 (MAA 6406) 3 credits

* Complex Analysis 2 (MAA 6407) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAA 5229
The complex plane and its geometry, stereographic projection and linear fractional transformations, analytic and harmonic functions, contour integration, Cauchy's theorem and the calculus of residues, and special functions and conformal mapping.

Topics in Real and Complex Analysis (MAA 6416) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced treatment of topics such as theory of distributions, Fourier analysis, and special functions. May be repeated for credit.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Introduction to Functional Analysis (MAA 6506) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 5145, MAA 5228, and MAA 5229
Introduction to the theory of functional analysis. Normed linear spaces, Hilbert spaces, Hahn-Banach Theorem, Open Mapping Theorem, Uniform Boundedness Principle, weak convergence, bounded linear operators. Applications to partial differential equations.

Topics in Functional Analysis (MAA 6526) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An advanced treatment of topics such as theory of normed linear spaces, Banach algebras, and Hilbert spaces; Gelfand theory and spectral theorem for normal operators, applications to integral equations, and other topics. Course may be repeated for credit.

* Introductory Combinatorics (MAD 5202) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2313 and MAD 2104 or permission of instructor
An introductory course in combinatorics; graphs and networks, enumeration, lattices, designs, codes, applications, and proof techniques.

* Introduction to Cryptology and Information Security (MAD 5474) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 2103, MAD 2502, MAS 4301
Classical ciphers and their analysis; unconditional versus computational security; basic constructions for stream ciphers; examples and modes of operation of block ciphers; cryptographic hash functions; public key encryption with ElGamal and RSA; digital signature schemes; Diffie-Hellman key exchange.

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Enumerative Combinatorics (MAD 6206) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Introduction to enumeration. Sets and multisets, permutations, sieve methods, partially ordered sets, lattices, incidence algebra, Moebius inversion, and generating functions.

* Combinatorics 2 (MAD 6207) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAD 6206
Advanced topics in graph theory, enumeration, generating functions and symmetric functions. Students are expected to present material from the textbook and to solve exercises.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Topics in Combinatorics (MAD 6209) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced treatment of topics such as block designs, coding theory, enumeration, graph theory, matroid theory, and umbral calculus. May be repeated for credit.

* Graph Theory (MAD 6307) 3 credits

Prerequisite: MAS 4107 or MAS 5311
A first graduate course in theory and applications of graphs, including basic properties, algorithms, matchings, network flows, connectivity, colorings, planarity, vector spaces, and polynomials associated with a graph.

Cryptography (MAD 6477) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Shannon theory. One-way, trapdoor functions, entropy. Symmetric and public-key cryptography. Stream and block ciphers. Diffie-Hellman, RSA, EIGamal systems and attacks. Elliptic curve systems. Hash functions and data integrity. Identification, digital signatures.

* Cryptanalysis (MAD 6478) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAD 6477 or equivalent
Entropy, probabilistic attacks. Passive and active attacks. Ciphertext-only, known-plaintext, chosen-plaintext, chosen-ciphertext attacks, adaptive attacks. Types of security. Know attacks on computationally-secure systems. Meet in the middle attacks. Differential and linear cryptanalysis. Random number generators, tests, analysis and weakness.

* Coding Theory (MAD 6607) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 4301 or permission of instructor
Channels, introduction to information theory, Shannon's capacity theorem, linear codes, Hamming, cyclic codes, BCH codes, sphere packings, the Golay codes, weight enumerators, MacWilliams' equation.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Topics in Mathematics for Teachers (MAE 5935) 1-4 credits

* Technology Implementation in Middle Grade Classrooms (MAE 6124) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAE 6127, 6324
Students gain mastery of dynamic geometry software, spreadsheets, graphing calculators, and presentation software through presentations of mathematical concepts to middle grade teachers and students.

* Patterns and Probability for Teachers of Middle Grades (MAE 6127) 3 credits
Topics in probability selected for their relevance to the middle grades and the Sunshine State Standards. Software applications to probability and related patterns. Connections to other areas of mathematics and the sciences.

* Iterations and Technology for Teachers of Middle Grades (MAE 6323) 3 credits
Topics in applying technology to iterations selected for their relevance to the middle grades and Sunshine State Standards. Patterns from iteration. Connections to other areas of mathematics and the sciences.

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* Patterns and Iterations for Teachers of Middle Grades (MAE 6324) 3 credits
Topics in iterations selected for their relevance to the middle grades and the Sunshine State Standards. Software applications to Pascal's triangle, self-similarity, and related patterns. Connections to other areas of mathematics and the sciences.

* Patterns and Scaling for Teachers of Middle Grades (MAE 6327) 3 credits
Topics in scaling selected for their relevance to the middle grades and the Sunshine State Standards. Algebraic and graphical representation of power laws and exponents. Applications in geometry, science, and medicine.

* Algebraic and Number Theoretical Patterns for Teachers of Middle Grades (MAE 6328) 3 credits
Topics in algebra and number theory selected for their relevance to the middle grades and the Sunshine State Standards. Software applications to the approximation of irrational numbers. Connections to other areas of mathematics and the sciences.

* Geometrical Connections for Teachers of Middle Grades (MAE 6329) 3 credits
Topics in geometry selected for their relevance to the middle grades and the Sunshine State Standards. Software applications to geometric constructions. Connections to other areas of mathematics and the sciences.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Chaos 1 (MAP 6211) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Engineering Mathematics 2
Scalar autonomous equations, elementary bifurcations, scalar maps, one-dimensional chaos, scalar non--autonomous equations, bifurcations of periodic equations, equations on tori and circle maps, planar autonomous systems.

* Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Chaos 2 (MAP 6212) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Dynamical Systems 1
Linear planar systems, planar systems near equilibria, Lyapunov functions, zero and purely imaginary eigenvalues, periodic orbits, conservative and gradient systems, planar maps, two-dimensional chaos, and dynamics of higher dimensional systems.

* Ordinary Differential Equations (MAP 6336) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAA 5228 and MAS 5145, or permission of instructor
Introduction to the theory of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), including existence, uniqueness, continuous dependence of solutions, the Hartman-Grobman Theorem, the Stable Manifold Theorem, the Poincare-Bendixson Theorem, and Floquet Theory. Applications to mechanical and biological systems.

* Partial Differential Equations (MAP 6345) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAA 5105
Introduction to the theory of partial differential equations. Laplace's Equation, the Heat Equation, the Wave Equation, first order equations, The Fourier Transform, Sobolev spaces, the Sobolev embedding theorems, and second order elliptic equations.

Topics in Applied Mathematics (MAP 6436) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced treatment of topics including ordinary and partial differential equations, potential theory, the calculus of variations, and optimal control theory. May be repeated for credit.

* Linear Algebra (MAS 5145) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 4107
Linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, characteristic and minimal polynomials, rational and Jordan canonical forms, determinants, quadratic forms, orthogonal diagonalization of symmetric matrices, unitary and Hermitian transformations.

* Introductory Abstract Algebra 1 (MAS 5311) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 4301 or permission of instructor
Groups, subgroups, and homomorphisms, the Sylow theorems, the structure theorem for finite abelian groups, elementary theory of fields and polynomial rings, the fundamental theorem of Galois theory.

* Introductory Abstract Algebra 2 (MAS 5312) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 5311 with a grade of "C" or better or permission of instructor
Continuation of MAS 5311. Groups, subgroups, and homomorphisms, the Sylow theorems, the structure theorem for finite abelian groups, elementary theory of fields and polynomial rings, the fundamental theorem of Galois theory.

* Algebraic Number Theory (MAS 6215) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 5311, 5312
The structure of the ring of integers in an algebraic number field; extension of primes and decomposition into products of prime ideals, action of the Galois group on these decompositions, bonds on the size of the ideal class group and the structure of the group of units.

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*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Number Theory and Cryptography (MAS 6217) 3 credits
Elementary number theory with applications to cryptography, including: congruences and modular arithmetic, finite fields, public key cryptography (RSA), primality testing and factoring.

* Advanced Algebra and Geometry (MAS 6318) 3 credits

Prerequisites: MAS 2103 and MAS 4301
Integrative treatment of advanced topics in classical algebra and geometry. Not intended for students in the Ph.D. program in mathematics.

Topics in Algebra (MAS 6396) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced treatment of topics such as field theory and Galois theory, finite groups, abelian groups, ring theory, commutative rings, cohomology of algebraic systems and ordered algebraic structures. May be repeated for credit.

Special Topics (MAT 5932) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Lectures on advanced specialized topics. May be repeated for credit.

Seminar in Mathematics (MAT 5938) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Seminar on specialized topics in mathematics. May be repeated for credit. Grading: S/U

* Supervised University Instruction in Mathematics (MAT 5946) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 18 graduate credits in mathematics
Guidance and supervised practice in the art of lecturing undergraduate mathematics. May be repeated once for credit. Grading: S/U

* Problem Solving and Recreational Mathematics (MAT 6516) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAA 4200 and MAS 4301
Introduction to mathematical problem solving literature, principles and methods of problem solving, and analysis of selected famous problems in recreational mathematics. Not intended for students in the Ph.D. program in mathematics.

* Mathematics and Technology (MAT 6715) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 2103 and MAA 4200
Technology has the potential to enhance the understanding and emphasize the interconnectedness of mathematics. This class explores applications of different classes of computer software. The student learns how appropriate technology can be used to present, explore, and build mathematical intuition. This course is not intended for students in the Ph.D. program in mathematics.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

Directed Independent Study (MAT 6907) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced topics relating to the special needs and interests of individual students.

Special Topics (MAT 6933) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Advanced Seminar in Mathematics (MAT 6939) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced seminar in mathematics on specialized topics. May be repeated for credit. Grading: S/U

Master's Thesis (MAT 6971) 1-6 credits

Advanced Research in Mathematics (MAT 7978) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. program
Research that is focused and relevant to the student's course of study in the Ph.D. program in Mathematics. The course requires oversight by the student's dissertation advisor. Grading: S/U

Dissertation (MAT 7980) 1-12 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral candidacy

* Set Theory (MHF 6107) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAS 4301 or permission of instructor
Includes Zermelo-Frankel axioms for set theory, ordinal and cardinal numbers, the axiom of choice, and Zorn's Lemma.

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* Mathematical Logic (MHF 6306) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAA 5228 and MAS 5311 or permission of instructor
Introduces students to mathematical logic, as currently practiced, and other topics in the foundations of mathematics.

Topics in the History of Mathematics (MHF 6405) 3 credits

Studies of English translations of various mathematical classics from ancient to modern times, covering a wide range of various mathematical ideas relevant to the teaching of mathematics at the high school level.

Calculus from a Historical Perspective (MHF 6410) 3 credits
Selected topics in calculus from the historical point of view including Archimedes' quadrature of the parabola, the calculation of Pi, the Bernoulli numbers, and sums of powers of numbers.

* Advanced Euclidean Geometry (MTG 6226) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAS 2103 and MAS 4301
Emphasizes the uses of homogeneous barycentric coordinates in triangle geometry and of dynamic software to explore basic theorems and problems. Not intended for students in the Ph.D. program in mathematics.

General Topology 1 (MTG 6316) 3 credits
Basic axioms and concepts of point-set topology, Tietze extension theorem, Urysohn lemma, Tychonoff theorem.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

* Algebraic Topology (MTG 6345) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MAA 5228, MAA 5229, MAS 5311, and MAS 5312
An introduction to the fundamental concepts and basic methods of algebraic topology: homotopy, homology, and cohomology of cell complexes and their applications to geometry and algebra.

Topics in Topology (MTG 6346) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced topics such as homotopy, homology, cohomology theories, combinatorial topology, and spectral sequences. May be repeated for credit.

Fractal Geometry (MTG 6415) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Fractal geometry describes the seemingly irregular shapes and patterns we encounter in the natural world. This course explores the mathematical concepts behind fractal geometry and gives numerous applications of integration of mathematics with the natural world.

Dynamical Systems, Chaos, and Computing (MTG 6418) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Students reconstruct some modern mathematical discoveries in dynamical systems using widely accessible programs such as spreadsheets and dynamical geometry software. Explorations illustrate the relation of chaos theory to iteration of second order polynomials and fractal geometry as well as general mathematical patterns.

* Biostatistics (STA 5195) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4234
An introduction to statistical tools used routinely for inference and data analysis in the health sciences. Topics include biostatistical design of medical studies, measure of disease occurrence and association, methods for rates and proportions, ROC analysis for screening and diagnosis, discrimination and classification, principal component analysis and factor analysis, log-linear models and survival analysis.

* Statistical Computing (STA 6106) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4443 or equivalent
Algorithms in statistical computing: Random number generation, generating other distributions, random sampling and permutations. Matrix computations in linear models. Non-linear optimization with applications to statistical procedures. Other topics of current interest, such as issues of efficiency and use of graphics.

* Survival Analysis (STA 6177) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4234 or equivalent
Introduces basic concepts of clinical trials, then the principles and methods of statistical inference that are commonly used for epidemiologic analysis of survival data. The major topics covered are: Basic concepts in survival analysis, types of censoring, life table and Kaplan-Meier, log-rank method and Cox proportional model. Software package R language is utilized.

* Biostatistics - Longitudinal Data Analysis (STA 6197) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4234
Course covers techniques for analyzing longitudinal or repeated measured data, including derivation and estimation of model parameters. Also covers univariate and multivariate analysis of variance for repeated measures, random or mixed-effect models, covariate pattern models, generalized estimating equations models, mixed-effect logistic regression models, and missing data in longitudinal studies.

* Applied Statistical Methods (STA 6207) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4443 or STA 6326 or equivalent
Overviews of normal theory inference and categorical data methods; basic concepts of experimental design; analysis of variance and covariance; introduction to regression models and selection procedures. Statistical software Minitab and R are used for data analysis.

* Mathematical Statistics (STA 6326) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 6444
Theory of inference, regression, ANOVA, robust procedures, or other selected topics.

* Mathematical Probability (STA 6444) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4443
Theory of random variables, stochastic processes, Brownian motion, renewal processes, martingales, or other selected topics and applications.

Topics in Probability and Statistics (STA 6446) 1-4 credits
Advanced treatment of topics from stochastic processes, limit laws, decision theory, and sequential methods. May be repeated for credit.

* Applied Time Series Analysis (STA 6857) 3 credits
Prerequisite: STA 4234
This course introduces fundamental concepts and some common models for time series data. Topics include stationarity, autocovariance function and spectrum, integral representation of a stationary time series and interpretation, ARMA, ARIMA and GARCH models, estimation and forecasting, multivariate time series, using R for the analysis of time series, and applications of time series.

Directed Independent Study (STA 6907) 1-4 credits
Study of topics relating to the special needs and interests of individual students.

*Prerequisite courses must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

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Physics


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Introduction to Astronomy (AST 2002) 3 credits
The development and present state of our understanding of the universe. Designed for non-science majors; no credit for Physics majors. This is a General Education course. Grading: Pass/fail option

Solar System Astronomy (AST 3110) 3 credits
Prerequisites: AST 2002 and PHY 2053
An intermediate, interdisciplinary course on the nature and dynamics of the solar system through applications of physics, atmospheric science, chemistry and geology. The course expands students' understanding of the different bodies in the solar system, of the fundamental principles of Earth processes to explain/predict processes on other bodies in or outside the solar system and to help them to consider the bodies for future exploration.

University Honors Seminar in Physics (PHY 1930) 1-4 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in physics.

Physics for Engineers 1 (PHY 2043) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2311 or MAC 2281
Intended for engineering major, the course surveys fundamental laws and phenomena of mechanics, fluids, and heat. Emphasis on mathematical analysis of physical problems. This is a General Education course.

Physics for Engineers 2 (PHY 2044) 3 credits
Prerequisites: (MAC 2312 or MAC 2282) and PHY 2043
Intended for engineering majors, the course surveys fundamental laws and phenomena of electricity, magnetism, and optics. Emphasis on mathematical analysis of physical problems.

General Physics 1 (PHY 2048) 4 credits
Prerequisite: MAC 2311 or MAC 2281
Intended for science majors, the course surveys the fundamental laws and phenomena of mechanics, fluids, heat, wave motion, and sound. Emphasis on mathematical analysis of physical problems. This is a General Education course.

General Physics 1 Laboratory (PHY 2048L) 1 credit
Corequisite: PHY 2048 or PHY 2053 or PHY 2043
Experiments in mechanics, fluids, heat, wave motion and sound comprise this course. Several classes cover developing theoretical problem solving techniques. This is a General Education course.

General Physics 2 (PHY 2049) 4 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 2048, and MAC 2312 or MAC 2282
Intended for science majors, the course surveys fundamental laws and phenomena of electricity, magnetism, and optics. Emphasis on mathematical analysis of physical problems.

General Physics 2 Laboratory (PHY 2049L) 1 credit
Corequisite: PHY 2049 or PHY 2054 or PHY 2044
Experiments in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics comprise this course. Several classes cover developing theoretical problem solving techniques.

College Physics 1 (PHY 2053) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" in one of the following: MAC 1114 or 1147 or 2233 or 2311 or 2281
The algebra- and trigonometry-based course surveys fundamental laws and phenomena of mechanics, fluids, heat, wave motion, and sound. Emphasis on understanding of physical concepts through examples drawn from the physical and life sciences. No credit for physics majors. This is a General Education course.

College Physics 2 (PHY 2054) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 2053
The algebra- and trigonometry-based course surveys fundamental laws and phenomena of electricity and magnetism, optics, special relativity, atomic and nuclear physics. Emphasis on understanding of physical concepts through examples drawn from the physical and life sciences. No credit for physics majors.

Physics Study Abroad (PHY 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Development of Modern Ideas in Physics (PHY 3031) 2 credits
The development and significance of physical concepts, from classical physics to the present day, discussed in an essentially non-mathematical way. Designed for non-science majors, the presentation avoids mathematical formalism. No credit for Physics majors.

Survey of Modern Physics (PHY 3101C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 2049 and MAP 3305
Survey of the quantum and statistical theories underlying modern physics as well as an overview of atomic and nuclear physics. The in-class lecture section will be complemented by experimental and computational exercises.

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Classical Mechanics (PHY 3221) 4 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 2048, MAP 3305
This course covers analytical mechanics through the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian variational formalisms. It emphasizes problem solving in applications to central-force and rigid-body motion as well as small oscillations.

Electromagnetism 1 (PHY 3323) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 2049, MAC 2313
Study of dynamic fields and the unification of electric and magnetic phenomena. Emphasis on induction and radiation phenomena with applications to optics and relativistic electrodynamics.

Thermodynamics (PHY 3503) 4 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2313 and PHY 2048
An introduction to the concepts of heat, work, entropy, and the laws of thermodynamics. The development of various thermodynamic representations and their applications to the bulk properties of matter, minimum work, phase transitions, and thermodynamic stability.

Physical Electronics (PHY 3722C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 2049
A series of interrelated lectures and laboratory exercises that studies D.C. and A.C. circuits, transistors, vacuum tubes, rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators, and pulse circuits. Emphasis on building circuits, including integrated circuits.

Electromagnetism 2 (PHY 4324) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 3323
This course studies dynamic fields and the unification of electric and magnetic phenomena. In particular, it considers induction and radiation phenomena as well as topics in optics and relativistic electrodynamics.

Statistical Mechanics (PHY 4523) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3101C
This course is an introduction to the statistical theory of thermodynamics. It develops the kinetic and ensemble theories before studying their applications to classical and quantum ideal gases, crystals, magnetic materials, and systems in chemical equilibrium.

Quantum Mechanics 1 (PHY 4604) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 3101C; Corequisite: PHZ 3113
This course introduces the modern theory of quantum mechanics. It studies both wave and matrix mechanics as well as their interrelation in the modern theory. Applications studied include particle systems, the simple harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom.

Quantum Mechanics 2 (PHY 4605) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 4604
Continuation of the development of modern quantum mechanics with emphasis on approximation methods suitable for analyzing more realistic quantum systems. Course also examines one or more advanced topics of current interest in the field.

Undergraduate Laboratory (PHY 4811L) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 3101C
A series of laboratory experiments in classical and modern physics, electrical measurement techniques, and optics, with applications to problems in atomic, nuclear, and solid-state physics comprise this course.

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Directed Independent Study (PHY 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Study of topics in physics relating to the special needs and interests of individual students.

Undergraduate Research (PHY 4910) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course offers credit to undergraduates participating in current research within the Department.

Special Topics (PHY 4936) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Lectures and directed reading on topics of contemporary interest in physics.

Physics Study Abroad (PHY 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Undergraduate Thesis (PHY 4972) 3-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course offers credit to undergraduates participating in current research within the Department and preparing a final activity report. Undergraduate theses must be approved by research supervisors and the Department Chair, but need not be defended. Grading: S/U

General Physics 3 (PHZ 2106) 4 credits
Prerequisites: MAC 2313 and PHY 2049
Examines wave phenomena in detail as a first example of sophisticated mathematical modeling of physical phenomena. Starting from simple systems of coupled oscillators, it builds to mechanical waves and ultimately to electromagnetic waves and diffractive optics.

Mathematical Methods for Physics (PHZ 3113) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MAP 3305
This course develops applied mathematics for the physical sciences. It introduces integral transform, Green's function and orthogonal function expansion methods for solving differential equations. It also examines selected advanced topics, such as complex variables.

Introduction to Biophysics (PHZ 4710) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 2054 or PHY 2049 or equivalent
An introductory survey of the ideas and application of physics in the realm of biology. Accessible to both Physics and Biology students. Emphasis is placed on how the ideas and tools of statistical physics can be used to give physical insights into complex biological problems with the aim of reaching new levels of quantitative understanding and prediction.

Physical Science (PSC 2121) 3 credits
A self-contained course for non-science majors that emphasizes analytical thinking and problem solving. It covers essential concepts in astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology and meteorology. No credit for both PSC 2121 and one of PHY 2043, PHY 2048 or 2053. This is a General Education course.

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Physics Graduate Courses

Stellar Physics (AST 5214) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHY 4324
Introduction to the physics of stellar structure and application to stellar evolution from the main sequence to white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars, and black holes. Introduction to nuclear reactions and applications to the synthesis of the intermediate and heavy elements in stars and supernovae.

Space Plasmas (AST 5305) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHY 4324
Study of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind and their interaction with the planets, especially the earth. Dynamical processes in the magnetic sphere.

Seminar in Astrophysics (AST 6219) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 4523 and permission of instructor
Numerical methods in hydrostatic and hydrodynamic stellar evolutionary studies, nuclear reaction networks and transport theory. It includes specialized topics in stellar evolution, supernovae, nuclear astrophysics and gravitational collapse.

Cosmology (AST 6416) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHY 4324; Corequisite: PHY 4523
Introduction to modern topics in cosmology: Spacetime structure of the universe; classical tests of the spacetime structure; particle dynamics; the particle connection; microwave background radiation; synthesis of the light elements; and primeval phase transitions and inflation.

Ecological Modeling (EVR 6070) 3 credits
Prerequisite: One semester of calculus
Overview of modeling and simulation techniques, with particular emphasis on applications in environmental science. Discussion of model formulation and validation, hypothesis testing, non-linear phenomena, and forecasting. Involves programming projects in an appropriate language, such as STELLA.

Topics in Physics (PHY 5935) 1-4 credits
An intensive study of topics of special interest to inservice teachers. It provides no credit toward a major in Physics.

Special Topics (PHY 5937) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Lectures and directed reading in advanced physics.

Mechanics (PHY 6247) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHZ 3113
Classical mechanics from the advanced standpoint: Hamilton's principle, Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and integral invariants.

Electromagnetism (PHY 6346) 4 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 4324, PHZ 3113
Boundary-value problems in electrostatics, magnetostatics and steady currents; it looks at multipoles, dielectrics, Maxwell's equations, and energy and momentum of the electromagnetic field.

Electromagnetic Fields (PHY 6347) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 6346
Plane electromagnetic waves and wave propagation, wave guides, simple radiating systems, radiation from moving charges, and scattering and multipole fields.

Statistical Mechanics (PHY 6536) 4 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 4523, PHY 4604
Theory and application of classical and quantum statistical mechanics.

Quantum Mechanics 1 (PHY 6645) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHZ 3113, PHY 4604
Fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics, quantum dynamics, angular momentum, exactly solvable three-dimensional problems, symmetry in quantum mechanics, approximation methods, scattering theory.

Quantum Mechanics 2 (PHY 6646) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 6645
Advanced concepts of quantum mechanics, many-particle theory and the local density approximation, introduction to relativistic and quasi-relativistic quantum theory, time-dependent perturbation theory and the interaction of particles with radiation.

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Quantum Field Theory 1 (PHY 6668) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 6645
Introduction to relativistic particle equations (Klein-Gordon, Dirac, Maxwell, Proca); classical field theory (Euler Lagrange equations and Noether's theorem); symmetries and invariances; introduction to field quantization; quantization of the Klein-Gordon, Dirac and Maxwell fields; covariant commutation relations; S-matrix expansion; Wick's theorem; QED S-operators and S-matrix elements to second order.

Quantum Field Theory 2 (PHY 6669) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 6668
Cross sections, Spin sums, polarization sums, trace theorems; calculation of QED interactions; radiative corrections; renormalization; introduction to weak interactions; leptonic weak interactions; IVB theory; gauge theory of weak interactions; the Goldstone model; the Higgs model; standard electro-weak theory.

Graduate Research (PHY 6918) 1-12 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Supervised research in physics for master's degree. Grading: S/U

Graduate Colloquium (PHY 6920) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This includes lectures and discussion on current topics in physics by graduate students, faculty, or visitors. Grading: S/U

Special Topics (PHY 6938) 1-4 credits
Lectures and reading in physics.

Master's Thesis (PHY 6971) 1-12 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of graduate coordinator
Grading: S/U

Advanced Research in Physics (PHY 7978) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. program
Research that is focused and relevant to the student's course of study in the Ph.D. program in Physics. The course requires oversight by the student's dissertation advisor. Grading: S/U

Dissertation (PHY 7980) 1-12 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral candidacy
Grading: S/U

Mathematical Physics (PHZ 5115) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHZ 3113, MAA 4402
Further topics in mathematical physics including: solution of partial differential equations by Greens functions, perturbation theory, integral equations, calculus of variations, and topics of special interest.

Computational Physics (PHZ 5156) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus or permission of instructor
Introduction to the use of numerical methods to solve realistic physics problems. Emphasis on good programming techniques and on obtaining insight into the problem rather than just numerical answers. Discussion of recent developments such as distributed and symbolic computing.

Introductory Solid-State Physics (PHZ 5405) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHY 3323
Interatomic binding in solids, crystal structures, reciprocal lattice, diffraction by periodic lattice, lattice vibrations, phonos, specific heat and thermal conductivity; free electron model, band theory, metals and semiconductors, and dielectric and magnetic properties of solids, and applications to semiconductor devices; the physics of structural materials; introduction to alloys.

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Plasma Physics (PHZ 5505) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHY 3323
Single particle motion in applied electric and magnetic fields, adiabatic invariants. The MHD equations, coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, the Vlasov equation, two-stream instability, Landau damping.

Special Relativity (PHZ 5606) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHY 3323
The systems of the special theory of relativity and an introduction to the general theory of relativity.

Introduction to Biophysics (PHZ 5715) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 2049 or PHY 2054 or equivalent
A survey of the ideas and application of physics in the realm of biology designed to be accessible to physics or biology students. Emphasis on how the ideas of statistical physics can be used to give physical insights into complex biological problems with quantitative understanding and prediction.

Modern X-ray Powder Diffraction (PHZ 6435C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Diffraction theory; diffractometers; analysis of powder diffraction data; automated computational procedures; Rietveld analysis of x-ray powder diffraction data. Includes lectures and experiments. The experimental work focuses on applications related to the students' research interests. Recommended for graduate students in physics, chemistry, and engineering.

Seminar in Solid-State Physics (PHZ 6496) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PHY 4604 and permission of instructor
The physics of solids. Topics discussed include: reciprocal space description of matter, phonon spectra of solids, quantized free electron model, band theory, electron statistics in semiconductors, optical properties of solids, and generation/recombination phenomena.

Numerical Relativity (PHZ 7609) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHY 6938 (General Relativity)
Offers an introduction to the mathematical formalisms employed to solve the Einstein equations numerically.

Shielding and Commissioning (RAT 6376) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Covers the science of opening a new radiation oncology center. Covers shielding calculations, installing and running the acceptance testing of a linear accelerator, high dose rate brachytherapy afterloader, CT simulator, treatment planning systems, commissioning of the treatment planning systems.

Medical Imaging Physics (RAT 6616) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Describes the basics of non-invasive imaging techniques, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), functional MRI, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG, MEG). Also covers analysis and visualization of high-dimensional datasets.

Radiation Therapy Physics (RAT 6628) 3 credits
Introductory course with a clinical orientation that reviews the rationale, basic science, methods, and applications of radiation therapy to the treatment of human diseases. Low- and high-energy photon therapy, electron and proton therapy, and low- and high-dose rate brachytherapy.

Advanced Photon Beam Radiation Therapy (RAT 6629) 3 credits
Prerequisite: RAT 6628
Course covers the physics and clinical application of advanced external beam photon therapies with special emphasis on IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy).

Radiation Physics (RAT 6686) 3 credits
Course covers the basics of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, atomic and nuclear structure, basic nuclear and atomic physics, radioactive decay, interaction of radiation with matter, radiation detection, and dosimetry.

Nuclear Medical Physics (RAT 6687) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Covers the fundamentals of nuclear physics and its application in the medical field as recommended by the AAPM. Students gain understanding of the physics and instrumentation of nuclear medicine.

Seminar in Medical Physics (RAT 6932) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Includes lectures and discussion on current topics in medical physics by faculty, graduate students and visitors. Grading: S/U

Radiation Therapy: Clinical Practicum and Shadowing (RAT 6947) 3 credits
Prerequisites: RAT 6628, RAT 6629
Application of medical physics to cancer therapy in a hospital setting under close supervision. Dosimetry, calibrations, commissioning, radiation survey, and treatment planning. Clinically
oriented laboratory-type projects are assigned. Grading: S/U

Master's Thesis (RAT 6975) 7 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of advisor
Research supervised by the thesis advisor. Grading: S/U

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Psychology


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Comparative Animal Behavior (CBH 4024) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012, BSC 1010
An introduction to the evolution and adaptive significance of animal behavior. Topics include traditional and modern ethological concepts; sensory function; orientation, migration and communication; territoriality and animal social behavior.

Abnormal Psychology (CLP 4144) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Understanding of so-called physical and mental illness by means of conventional and common path theories.

Clinical Psychology (CLP 4343) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Provides an understanding of the practice of modern clinical psychology. Students will be able to understand the theory and application of evidence-based practice in clinical psychology, including assessment, treatment, forensic settings, healthcare applications and organizational consulting.

Psychology of Human Development (DEP 3053) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Examines changes in behavior over the course of development and the processes underlying these changes. All major areas of child development are reviewed, including cognitive, social/personality, language, and biological, with attention to development in adolescence and adulthood.

Childhood Bilingualism (DEP 3134) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
A survey of current thinking and empirical research in the fields of childhood bilingualism and second language acquisition in childhood. Includes material from the fields of psychology, linguistics, and education.

Personality and Social Development (DEP 4095) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and DEP 3053
A review of psychological theory and research on age trends and individual differences in personality and social development.

Infant Development (DEP 4115) 3 credits
This course provides an overview of the field of infant development with a particular focus on behavioral development. Topics to be considered are physical, physiological, sensory, perceptual, and cognitive development during the first year of life in humans and other species.

Language Acquisition (DEP 4130) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and DEP 3053
A broad background course in the psychological aspects of language and its acquisition. Topics include the psychology and acquisition of grammar, word meaning, reading comprehension, and conversational rules, among others.

Cognitive Development (DEP 4163) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and DEP 3053
An examination of psychological research and theory of age changes in children's thinking. Topics include Piagetian theory and concept and memory development.

Psychology of Adolescence (DEP 4305) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
A topical study of adolescent behavioral and psychological development with emphasis on theory, methods of inquiry, and practical implications.

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Human Development Laboratory (DEP 4797C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: DEP 3053
Students participate in research activities and seminar discussions that illustrate current methods in the psychological study of human development. Firsthand research experiences and related readings provide exposure to and training in the practice of human developmental research applied to different age periods and domains.

Cognition (EXP 3505) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Experimental and theoretical aspects of human learning and cognition. Topics include attention, human learning and memory, organization of knowledge, concept formation and problem solving.

Auditory Perception (EXP 4120) 3 credits
This advanced course provides a thorough introduction to the normal processes of auditory perception and attention. Covered topics include the physics of sound, peripheral auditory anatomy and physiology, auditory psychophysics, and anatomy and physiology of the central auditory pathway.

Music Perception and Cognition (EXP 4180) 3 credits
Prerequisite: EXP 3505 or EXP 4120, or permission of instructor
This advanced course introduces an area of growing importance in cognitive neuroscience: the perception, performance, and cognition of music. Topics include evolution of music, physics of sound, auditory perception, musical structure, emotion, neuroscience, performance, and composition.

Human Perception (EXP 4204) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and either EXP 3505 or PSB 3002
The development of theoretical models of human perception on the basis of experimental research into visual sensory systems, the perception of movement and space, and differential information processing capacities.

Psychology of Motivation (EXP 4304) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
A critical examination of the concept of motivation as an explanatory mechanism in understanding behavior.

Psychology of Learning (EXP 4404) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012 and PSY 3213
Lectures concerned with problems, methods and content in the area of learning.

Human Memory (EXP 4525) 3 credits

Prerequisite: PSY 1012
This course presents psychological research and theory related to human memory. Multiple memory systems are discussed, including short-term or working memory, long-term memory, procedural memory, implicit memory, and semantic memory. Different populations of memory users are also discussed, including children, older adults, and amnesics.

Psychology of Reading (EXP 4620) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
A broad background course in the cognitive approaches to the study of reading and text comprehension. Topics include: Eye fixations and word encoding; the representation of meaning; sentence comprehension; discourse coherence; inferential processes; comprehension strategies.

Psychology of Language (EXP 4640) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Investigates how humans represent, produce, understand and acquire native language. Topics include theoretical linguistics, language acquisition, language processing, and neurolinguistics.

Cognition Laboratory (EXP 4934C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and EXP 3505 (may be taken concurrently)
Students apply knowledge of cognitive psychology to the testing of scientific hypotheses, improve skills in oral and written reports, and obtain firsthand experience with the ways that cognitive psychologists use computers to conduct research.

Interpersonal Processes (PCO 4734) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and either PSY 3213 or PSY 3234
An examination of psychological processes involved in the development, maintenance and dissolution of interpersonal relationships.

Personality Theories (PPE 4003) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Psychoanalytic, behavioristic and humanistic theories of personality. Primary emphasis on cognitive systems of individuals.

Experimental Studies of Personality (PPE 4700) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
An examination of psychological theory and research on how a variety of personality trait dimensions interact with situations to determine social behavior.

Biological Bases of Behavior (PSB 3002) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
A study of the structures and functions of the neural and endocrine systems as they relate to behavior.

Computer Lab in Psychobiology (PSB 3002L) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSB 3002
Computer-based system of instruction that covers cell biology, electrical theory, resting-membrane potentials, action potentials, synaptic potentials, neuroanatomy and neurochemistry, and sensory systems.

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Laboratory in Psychobiology (PSB 4004L) 3 credits
Prerequisites: EXP 4404 or PSB 4504 or PSB 3002, plus a "B" average
Lecture and supervised laboratory methods and report writing in psychobiology. Topics include animal conditioning, sensory-motor and motivational development, and surgical and pharmacological procedures. Highly recommended for students planning on graduate work in psychology.

Biological Bases of Behavior 2 (PSB 4006) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSB 3002
A survey of the biological bases of specific species-typical behaviors such as sleep, language and memory, ingestive behaviors, reproductive behavior, emotion and stress, and human communication.

Neuropsychology (PSB 4240) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and PSB 3002
Explores the fundamentals of human neuropsychology, including the effects of brain damage on memory, language and spatial behavior, development and recovery of function.

Human Psychophysiology (PSB 4323) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSB 3002
An introduction to the study of human physiological responses (EEG, EKG, etc.) and related psychological processes.

Psychopharmacology (PSB 4444) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and PSB 3002
An introduction to the major classes of psychoactive drugs and how they affect behavior. Equal emphasis will be given to laboratory and clinical studies.

Developmental Psychobiology (PSB 4504) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Examines biological and psychological contributions to the development of behavior. Topics include: the concept of innate behavior; critical periods in early development; and selected aspects of motivational development.

Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (PSB 4810) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSB 3002, PSB 4006, PSY 3213
Examination of contemporary research findings and hypothesis concerning the neural substrates of learning and memory. The cellular basis of plasticity is examined in relation to both animal and human studies.

Biopsychology of Language (PSB 4833) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
An introduction to the biological foundations of normal human language and speech. Topics include the evolutionary specialization for language, theories of speech perception and production, the acoustic signal, and relevant physiology.

General Psychology (PSY 1012) 3 credits
An appraisal of the antecedents and determinants of human behavior with special reference to individual differences, perception, learning, and personality formation. This is a General Education course.

University Honors Seminar in Psychology (PSY 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in psychology.

Special Topics in Psychology (PSY 2930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Selected topics in psychology.

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Psychology Study Abroad (PSY 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Research Methods in Psychology (PSY 3213) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Introduction to research design and methods in psychology. Topics include observation and description of behavior; methods of measurement; and analytic and quasi-analytic experimental design. Laboratory exercises included to illustrate designs and provide experience in research report writing.

Experimental Design and Statistical Inference (PSY 3234) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisite: PSY 1012

Interpretation of data, curve-fitting and inferential techniques are considered for a variety of experimental paradigms in the life sciences including small and correlated samples.

Fractals in Psychology (PSY 3502) 3 credits
Course shows how fractal methods can be used to analyze experimental data and gain a better understanding of the physiology and psychology of perception and behavior.

Cooperative Education - Psychology (PSY 3949) 1-3 credits
Grading: S/U

Personality Testing and Measurement (PSY 4302) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and PSY 3234
Theory and method in personality measurement: reliability, validity, examples of tests used to measure personality traits and other dispositions.

History and Systems of Psychology (PSY 4604) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Philosophical sources. Emergence of such systems as structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, and Gestalt psychology and contemporary theory in psychology.

Evolutionary Psychology (PSY 4810) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Provides a broad overview of historical and modern research and theory in evolutionary psychology, the study of the evolution of the mechanisms of the mind. Topics include mating, parenting, social exchange, and violence.

Advanced Evolutionary Psychology (PSY 4812) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 4810
Course provides an advanced overview of the field of evolutionary psychology. A broad range of topics is covered from an evolutionary perspective, including key concepts, issues, and areas of research.

Directed Independent Study (PSY 4906) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Grading: S/U

Special Topics (PSY 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Selected topics in Psychology.

Honors Seminar (PSY 4932) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Department

Psychology Study Abroad (PSY 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Honors Thesis (PSY 4970) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Grading: S/U

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Social Psychology (SOP 3004) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Introduction to psychological theory and research on the nature and causes of human social behavior.

Psychology of Women (SOP 3742) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Lectures and discussions dealing with the empirical and theoretical literature related to the psychological aspects of sexual differentiation in general, and women in particular.

Social Behavior Laboratory (SOP 4230C) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Methods and theories relevant to the scientific study of social behavior, with special attention to social attraction, helping and compliance, group productivity, and the spread of social influence in groups and populations. Lecture and laboratory.

Psychology and the Law (SOP 4751) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 1012
Course helps students understand the modern applications of psychology to civil and criminal competencies, torts and personal injury, investigation and interviewing, the insanity defense, criminal classification, juvenile and family law, sexual deviance and violent behavior, offender profiling, dangerousness prediction, trial testimony, jury psychology and the role of the psychologist as expert witness.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Intermediate Statistics Lab (STA 3163L) 1 credit
Gordon Rule, computational
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and PSY 3234 (may be taken concurrently)
Computer organization, computer implementation of basic and intermediate statistical inferences that include describing data, graphic presentation, analysis of data. Applications will reflect the descriptive and statistical inferences appropriate to the discipline under which this course is offered (e.g., business, education, engineering, mathematics, psychology, etc.).

Social Psychology Study Abroad (SYP 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Current Issues in Social Psychology (SYP 4002) 3 credits

Prerequisites: SOP 3004 and either PSY 3234 or PSY 3213
An in-depth examination of a current topic or issue in social psychology such as health, illness, law, aggression and others.

Individuals in Modern Culture (SYP 4010) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Study of research and theory concerned with the relationships between social institutions and individual personality. Includes a discussion of socialization and development of self, social types, and roles in relation to social structure, personality and culture.

Intra- and Intergroup Processes (SYP 4030) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SYG 1300 with a grade of "C" or better (or equivalent with permission of instructor)
Study of the process of social interaction, group formation, maintenance and intergroup relations.

Social Cognition (SYP 4120) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SOP 3004
Study of the processes involved in our perception of and thoughts about other people in a social environment. Introduces research in social perception and cognition, and reviews areas of application of this research such as law, business, health, and environment.

Social Psychology Study Abroad (SYP 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

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Psychology Graduate Courses

Seminar in Evolutionary Psychology (CBH 6303) 3 credits
Provides broad overview of historical and modern research and theory in evolutionary psychology and the study of the evolution of the mechanisms of the mind. Topics include mating, parenting, social exchange, and violence.

Seminar in Personality and Psychopathology (CLP 6166) 3 credits
An advanced study of psychoanalytic, behavioristic, and humanistic theories of personality. Primary emphasis is on prediction of behavior from investigation of cognitive (including value) systems of individuals.

Seminar in Cognitive Development (DEP 6067) 3 credits
A study of the development of processes involved in thinking and learning.

Seminar in Personality and Social Development (DEP 6098) 3 credits
A critical review of contemporary theory and research on personality and social development in children.

Parent-Child Relationships (DEP 6609) 3 credits
Course will provide an overview of contemporary theory and research on human parent-child relationships. Fundamentals of developmental psychology will be applied to central issues facing children, parents, and their families.

Evolutionary Developmental Psychology (DEP 6610) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of instructor
This seminar acquaints students with the emerging field of evolutionary developmental psychology. Introduction of key concepts, issues, and lines of research. Students are expected to take an active role in discussing and developing the topic under consideration.

Special Topics in Developmental Psychology (DEP 6930) 3 credits
A survey of current research and theory pertaining to selected topics in developmental psychology.

Seminar in Development of Social Cognition (DEP 6931) 3 credits
A critical review of contemporary theory and research on social cognition as it relates to children's social and personality development.

Seminar in Individual Differences in Children's Thinking (DEP 6932) 3 credits
An overview and critical analysis of concepts, theories and empirical findings related to individual differences in children's (and adults') intellectual performance.

Seminar in Human Perception (EXP 6208) 3 credits
A study of the development of theoretical models of perception with an emphasis on human information-processing capacities.

Seminar in Learning and Conditioning (EXP 6406) 3 credits
A study in experimental methodology and content in the areas of learning and motivation.

Seminar in Cognition (EXP 6609) 3 credits
A discussion of experimental and theoretical aspects of cognition. Topics include attention, human learning and memory, organization of knowledge, problem solving, and decision making.

Special Topics in Cognition (EXP 6930) 3 credits
A survey of the current literature pertaining to selected topics in cognition.

Directed Independent Study (EXP 6908) 1-3 credits
Grading: S/U

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Seminar in Self-Concept and Behavior (PPE 6209) 3 credits
An overview and a critical analysis of theory and research pertaining to self-reflection and its relation to behavior.

Seminar in Experimental Studies of Personality (PPE 6709) 3 credits
An examination of psychological theory and research on the relationship between personality dispositions and behavior.

Special Topics in Personality and Social Psychology (PPE 6930) 3 credits
A survey of the current literature pertaining to selected topics in personality and social psychology.

Biological Vision (PSB 5117) 3 credits
Visual perception is studied through its basis in retinal and cortical neurophysiology, with emphasis on the Fourier domain in early processing and cooperative neural interactions in pattern formation.

Principles of Neuroscience (PSB 6037) 3 credits
A survey of principles of neuroscience as they relate to behavior. Topics include morphology and connectivity of neural cells, biological potentials, gross structure of the central and peripheral nervous system, and sensory, motor, and higher-order integrative functions.

Seminar in Behavioral Neuroscience (PSB 6058) 3 credits
A subdiscipline of neuroscience, behavioral neuroscience explores how behavior is controlled by the nervous system. Topics such as neural control of waking and arousal, neural control of movement, and the role of dopamine in reinforcement are covered.

Methods in Psychobiology (PSB 6118) 3 credits
Corequisite: Graduate seminar in psychobiology
A survey of techniques used in psychobiological research. Topics include methods of behavioral observation, including kinematic analysis, measurement of physiological responses, surgical and pharmacological techniques, and histological and neurochemical analysis. Grading: S/U

Neuroscience 1 (PSB 6345) 3 credits
A course of in-depth coverage of the principles of neural science, including functional neuroanatomy, sensory processes, higher brain function, and development of the nervous system.

Neuroscience 2 (PSB 6346) 3 credits
A course of in-depth coverage of the principles of neural science, including functional neuroanatomy, sensory processes, higher brain function, and development of the nervous system.

Seminar in Developmental Psychobiology (PSB 6509) 3 credits
A discussion of current research and theory concerning biological and psychological contributions to the development of behavior.

Developmental Neurobiology (PSB 6515) 3 credits
Prerequisites: PSY 1012 and PSB 3002
In-depth coverage of the principles and recent advances in the development of the brain and nervous system, including nerve cell migration, axon outgrowth, specificity, plasticity, neurotrophism, nerve cell death, and the influence of experience on the nervous system.

Developmental Neuropsychology (PSB 6516) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of instructor
This seminar is designed to introduce students to theories and research on brain maturity and human cognitive development. Key concepts such as brain asymmetry and neuroplasticity are analyzed. Abnormalities resulting from neurological or other biological disruptions are discussed.

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Seminar in Sensory Processes (PSB 6609) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSB 6037 or permission of instructor
A survey of the sensory processes. Topics include sensory transduction and psychophysics, biological potentials, sensory coding, and anatomy and connectivity of the five fundamental sensory systems.

Seminar in Biopsychology of Language (PSB 6809) 3 credits
An introduction to the biological foundations of language and speech. Topics include the evolutionary specialization for language, speech perception and production, and acoustic and articulatory control.

Special Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience (PSB 6930) 3 credits
A survey of the current literature pertaining to selected topics in behavioral neuroscience.

Special Topics (PSY 5930) 3 credits
Selected topics in psychology.

Experimental Design 1 (PSY 6206) 3 credits
An introduction to the design and analysis of experiments in psychology, with special emphasis on analysis of variance models.

Experimental Design 1 Lab (PSY 6206L) 1 credit
The primary goal of this course is to provide students with hands-on experience using SPSS, an advanced statistical software package used in the social and biological sciences. Students gain experience in behavioral data entry, manipulation, analysis, interpretation and visualization.

Experimental Design 2 (PSY 6207) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 6206 or its equivalent
Advanced treatment of experimental designs in psychology, with special emphasis on the analysis of variance in multifactor experiments. It also examines covariance and multiple regression analysis.

Evolution of Human Sexuality (PSY 6840) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate Psychology student status
Seminar is designed to introduce students to classic and contemporary theory and research on the evolution of human sexuality and behavior.

Special Topics (PSY 6930) 1-3 credits
Selected topics in psychology are discussed.

Cooperative Education - Psychology (PSY 6949) 1-3 credits

Master's Thesis (PSY 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Advanced Research in Psychology (PSY 7978) 1-9 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. program
Focused, relevant research in the student's course of study in the Ph.D. program in psychology. This course requires oversight by the student's dissertation advisor. Grading: S/U

Dissertation (PSY 7980) 1-15 credits
Grading: S/U

Advanced Social Behavior (SOP 6079) 3 credits
Advanced theory and methods for studying the dynamics of social systems. Topics include social interaction, the social inhibition of pro- and antisocial behavior, group productivity, and dynamic social impact.

Seminar in Social Cognition and Behavior (SOP 6440) 3 credits
A critical review of current research and theory on social cognition and its relationship to human behavior.

Link to Charles E. Schmidt College of Science Programs

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