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GENERAL INFORMATION

 
Degree Requirements

This section of the Preliminary 2014-2015 FAU University Catalog includes revisions approved after the 2013-2014 catalog's publish date of March 15, 2013. Revisions appear in red.

Degree Requirements


Associate of Arts
Baccalaureate
Second Baccalaureate
Minors
Master's
Second Master's
Doctoral
Second Doctoral


Advising Services

Application for Degree


Foreign Language Graduation Requirement

Gordon Rule (Writing Across Curriculum and Computation Skills)

Intellectual Foundations Program (General Education Curriculum)

Lower-Division College Requirements/Recommended Courses

Mathematics Placement Exam

Substitute Courses for ENC 1102


Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Students assume all responsibility for all graduation requirements.

Undergraduate Studies, Office of the Dean
The Undergraduate Studies Office is headed by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies who reports directly to the University Provost and Chief Academic Officer. Its mission is to ensure that Florida Atlantic University provides baccalaureate degree programs of the highest academic quality in a supportive environment that promotes successful completion of the degrees.

Advancement of this mission is supported by a number of ancillary academic services that, under the supervision of the Dean, make major contributions to the enhancement of the undergraduate experience. They include Freshman Academic University Advising Services, International Programs, the Center for Learning and Student Success, the Student-Athlete Center for Academic Excellence, Testing and Evaluation, the University Center for Excellence in Writing, the University Honors Program and Writing Across the Curriculum. Several of these services are found in the Student Services and Activities section of this catalog. Through these combined efforts, Undergraduate Studies contributes to the fulfillment of the University mission, which is in part, " . . . to serve its region, state and nation by preparing students to make meaningful contributions to an increasingly complex global society."

Planning the Degree Program
Students should plan their degree program in consultation with their advisor. For planning purposes, it is important to read this Degree Requirements section carefully and to refer questions to the advisor or other appropriate offices. Many of the degree requirements described are most conveniently satisfied during the lower division (prior to the student's completion of 60 credits). When planning their lower-division program, students should consider the Intellectual Foundations Program (general education) requirements and others, such as the Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) and Gordon Rule Computation Skills as described in this section, the college requirements for their major as described in this section and their major college requirements as described in the appropriate college section.

Freshman Academic University Advising Services

Freshman Academic The primary focus for University Advising Services is first- and second-year students. UAS provides a safety net for these students when they are not sure where to go for assistance. In support of this mission, the UAS office offers a comprehensive array of services aimed at helping students develop and implement an appropriate and meaningful education plan. UAS provides:

• Advising and course selection for all undecided/exploratory students regardless of number of earned credits;

• Support services for students not in good academic standing with up to 60 earned credits;

• Support services for students with fewer than 60 earned credits (freshmen and sophomores).

Note: Referrals to specific college advising offices are made after three semesters and/or 45 earned credits for those students who have declared majors and are in good academic standing.

The academic advising philosophy for UAS is based on the Appreciative Advising model. It is the intentional collaborative practice of asking positive, open-ended questions that help students optimize their educational experience, achieve their dreams and goals and reach their potential. The student and advisor, as partners, work together to discover the student's passion and dreams, design a plan to achieve those dreams, deliver on that plan and make changes as necessary to achieve their goals.


In addition to the services above, UAS provides the following freshman success courses:

Just a Click Away: Finding and Using Information (LIS 1001) 1 credit
Introduces traditional scholarly information sources, computerized information systems and the University library system. Students explore the research process as they gain experience in critically thinking about information resources.

Career and Life Planning (SLS 1301) 1 credit
Provides an overview of career development theories and decision-making skills for career/life planning. Focuses on self-assessment, choosing a major, exploring career paths and developing an action plan to help achieve career goals. The course also provides strong emphasis on the development of presentation, oral and written communication skills as essential skills for any future major/career.

The Learning Community Experience (SLS 1412) 0 credits
Prerequisite: SLS 1503
The Learning Community experience combines student academic learning in and out of the classroom through activities, both discipline- and interdisciplinary-specific. Based on Student Development Theory, students participate in a variety of programs, workshops and events and reflect on their relevance to enhancing the students' overall college experience.

Honors Introduction to Academic Life (SLS 1501) 1 2 credits (Credit change is effective fall 2013.)
Required for first-year students in the University Honors Program, this course is designed to increase the students' success in college by assisting them in obtaining the knowledge and skills necessary to reach their educational objectives. Topics include the nature of postsecondary education, time management, test-taking, communication skills, study techniques, question-asking skills, and library use.

Learning Strategies and Human Development (SLS 1503) 2 credits
Designed to assist students in making the transition into higher education. Topics include time management, test-taking skills, learning strategies and styles, diversity, short- and long-term planning, developing analytical and critical thinking skills, relationships and campus resources.

All program activities and services offered by Freshman Academic University Advising Services are aimed at aiding students in developing and implementing an appropriate and meaningful educational plan. For information, visit the Freshman Academic University Advising Services website or call 561-297-3064.

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Associate of Arts Degree Requirements

To earn an Associate of Arts degree from FAU, students must be degree-seeking and:

1. Earn a minimum of 60 credits in academic courses acceptable toward the degree with at least a cumulative 2.0 FAU GPA.

2. Earn a minimum of 40 of the 60 credits at the lower-division (1000-2000) level as indicated by the Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS) designations or their equivalents.

3. Earn a minimum of 30 of the 60 credits in residence at FAU and complete the last semester in residence at FAU.

4. Apply no more than 30 credits of non-traditional credit toward the degree earned through Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Correspondence Courses, International Baccalaureate (IB) or Military Service Schools, subject to limits for each as stated in the Academic Policies and Regulations section of this catalog. Credits earned in this manner will be considered transfer credits.

5. Fulfill the Intellectual Foundations Program requirements.

6. Satisfy the Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) and Gordon Rule Computation Skills requirements (see explanation elsewhere in this section).

7. Submit an Associate of Arts degree application to Freshman Academic University Advising Services (see Application for Degree explanation elsewhere in this section).

Note: Students may not apply for an Associate of Arts degree in a semester in which a baccalaureate degree is awarded. Non-degree students and students who transfer with 40 or more credits may not apply for the A.A. degree at FAU. Additionally, students with an "I" (incomplete) grade on their transcripts may not apply for the A.A. degree until the "I" is removed.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

To earn a baccalaureate degree, students must:

1. Earn a minimum of 120 credits in academic courses acceptable toward the degree (some programs require more than 120 credits). Attain a minimum 2.0 grade point average in the courses required for a major program at FAU.

2. Earn a minimum of 45 of these 120 credits at the upper division as indicated by the Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS) designations or their equivalents. In some programs, graduate-level courses may be used to satisfy undergraduate requirements; however, no undergraduate will be required to take a graduate-level course as part of a normal degree requirement.

3. Apply no more than 60 credits of non-traditional credit toward the degree earned through Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Correspondence Courses, International Baccalaureate (IB) or Military Service Schools, subject to limits for each as stated in the Academic Policies and Regulations section of this catalog. Credits earned in this manner will be considered transfer credits.

4. Earn the last 30 upper-division credits in residence at FAU. In programs requiring more than 120 credits, at least 25 percent of the total number of credits required for the degree must be earned in residence at FAU.

5. Earn at least 75 percent of all upper-division credits in the major department from FAU (effective for students who entered FAU in fall 2010 and going forward). Some major departments may require more than 75 percent. Consult the degree requirements section of the major for details. (The previous requirement, earn at least 50 percent of all upper-division credits in the major department from FAU, is still in effect for students who entered FAU prior to fall 2010.)


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6. Fulfill the Intellectual Foundations Program requirements.

7. Summer Credit Requirement: Earn a minimum of 9 credits by attending one or more summer terms at either FAU or another university in the Florida State University System. This requirement applies only to students admitted to FAU as freshmen or as transfer students with fewer than 60 credits (Florida Board of Governors Regulation 6.016). (For those students enrolled before fall 2011, credits earned and transferred through the Advanced International Certificate in Education (AICE) Program, Advanced Placement (AP) Program, College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Dual Enrollment (DE) Program or International Baccalaureate (IB) Program may be applied toward the 9-credit summer requirement, thereby reducing students' summer credit requirement total.)

8. Satisfy the Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) and Gordon Rule Computation Skills requirements (see explanation elsewhere in this section).

9. Fulfill the admission and graduation requirements of the department and college granting the degree as described following the Lower-Division College and Department Requirements (explanation elsewhere in this section).

10. Fulfill the foreign language graduation requirement. Applies to students seeking the B.A. or B.S. degree or four-year students seeking the B.F.A. or B.Mus. degree.

11. Submit an Application for Degree form (see Application for Degree explanation elsewhere in this section).

Academic Learning Compacts
In compliance with Policy Guideline 05.02.15 as approved by the Chancellor of the State University System, Florida Board of Governors Office, FAU will provide students access to information about Academic Learning Compacts for each baccalaureate degree program. The Academic Learning Compact for each program identifies 1) content/discipline knowledge and skills, 2) communication skills and 3) critical thinking skills students in that program are expected to demonstrate prior to graduation and the methods by which students will be assessed on these skills. Students may obtain print copies of Academic Learning Compacts for each baccalaureate degree program by contacting the appropriate program or department.

Second Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

To earn a second baccalaureate degree, students must:

1. Earn a minimum of 30 credits in residence at FAU beyond those required for the first degree. Students earning two degrees simultaneously (a "dual degree") must earn at least 150 credits.

2. Earn at least 75 percent of all upper-division credits in the major department from FAU (effective for students who entered FAU in fall 2010 and going forward). Some major departments may require more than 75 percent. Consult the degree requirements section of the major for details. (The previous requirement, earn at least 50 percent of all upper-division credits in the major department from FAU, is still in effect for students who entered FAU prior to fall 2010.)

3. Satisfy the admission and graduation requirements of the department and college granting the second degree as described under the heading Lower-Division College and Department Requirements (explanation elsewhere in this section). Students who have received a bachelor's degree from a four-year accredited institution of higher education will be deemed as having met the FAU general education requirements. Students must meet the foreign language requirement, however, if required for one of the two degrees.

4. Submit an Application for Degree form (see Application for Degree elsewhere in this section).


Minor Requirements

In addition to having a major, students may declare no more than two minors. Students must earn at least 75 percent of all credits required for the minor from FAU. Some departments may require more than 75 percent. A list of available minors appears in the Degree Programs section of this catalog. The descriptions and requirements for each minor are listed under the Academic Programs link within the college in which the minors are offered.

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Intellectual Foundations Program—FAU's General Education Curriculum

(for students matriculating in fall 2009 and later)
FAU believes that higher education should go well beyond the preparation of individuals for demanding careers in their chosen fields. It should also provide broad intellectual enrichment through systematic exposure to diverse academic experiences. The purpose of the general education curriculum in this endeavor is to develop the intellectual skills, habits of thought, ethical values and love of learning that transcend the choice of major. These are the hallmarks of educated men and women capable of meeting effectively the social, political and economic challenges of contemporary life. Perhaps at no other time in history has a well-rounded, inquiring intellect been more important and useful than in the world of rapid technological change and ever increasing globalization in which we now live. Thus, the mission of a comprehensive university education is to produce graduates who can intelligently analyze information, appreciate diverse peoples and ideas and adapt to change through the self-motivated acquisition of new knowledge.

Consequently, the FAU general education curriculum is a carefully devised program that draws on many subject areas to provide and reinforce essential skills and values from different points of view. It equips students with the academic tools they will need to succeed, not only as undergraduates in their degree programs, but also as responsible citizens in a complex world. The courses that comprise the FAU general education curriculum combine to develop:

1. Knowledge in several different disciplines;

2. The ability to think critically;

3. The ability to communicate effectively;

4. An appreciation for how knowledge is discovered, challenged and transformed as it advances; and

5. An understanding of ethics and ethical behavior.

Students are invited to select from a number of courses, all at the lower-division level, in completing their general education requirements. All of the courses contribute to meeting the overall goals of the general education curriculum, thereby allowing flexibility in making individual choices. Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits of general education coursework, distributed as indicated in the six categories below.

A course may be used to simultaneously satisfy a general education curriculum requirement and a requirement of the student's major program, except for the interdisciplinary majors in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters (Interdisciplinary Studies: Arts & Humanities and Interdisciplinary Studies: Social Sciences). All course selections should be made in consultation with an advisor.


Link to Foundations of Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning

Link to Foundations of Science and the Natural World

Link to Foundations of Society and Human Behavior

Link to Foundations of Global Citizenship

Link to Foundations of Creative Expression

I. Foundations of Written Communication
Learning to communicate effectively is much more than putting thoughts and ideas into words. Writing, in particular, allows us to develop and organize our thoughts and ideas in intelligible and meaningful ways. Effective communication involves the examination of evidence, the development of ideas and the clear expression of those ideas. Communication also involves the application of ethical standards when using words or ideas that are not one's own. Courses that fulfill this requirement are designed not only to develop students' writing skills but their ability to think critically—to question habitual ways of thinking, to move beyond obvious responses and to develop new ways to see themselves and the world around them.

Students who complete the Written Communication requirement will be able to:

1. Produce clear writing that performs specific rhetorical tasks;

2. Respond critically to a variety of written materials in order to position their own ideas and arguments relative to the arguments and strategies of others;

3. Use writing not only to communicate but also to think critically—examining assumptions that underlie the readings and their own writing;

4. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical standards that apply to the use of external sources in one's writing.

Foundations of Written Communication Courses
(6 credits; two courses; grade of "C" or higher required)
College Writing 1 ENC 1101 3
College Writing 2 ENC 1102 3
Students may substitute one of the following courses for ENC 1102:
Cultural Difference in a Globalized Society ANT 1471 3
University Honors Seminar in Writing ENC 1930 3
Special Topics: College Writing 2
ENC 1939 3
Honors Composition for Science
ENC 2452 3
Being Cared For: Reflections from the Other Side of the Bed NSP 1195 3

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II. Foundations of Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
Mathematics is a peculiarly human endeavor that attempts to organize our experience in a quantitative fashion. It aids and supplements our intuitions about the physical universe and about human behavior. The Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning requirement is intended to give students an appreciation of mathematics and prepare them to think precisely and critically about quantitative problems. Note: Students must take at least one course with the prefix MAC or MGF from the list below.

Students who satisfy the Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning requirement will:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of mathematical theories and their applications;

2. Be able to identify and apply mathematical concepts most appropriate to solving quantitative problems.

Foundations of Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Courses (6 credits; two courses; at least one with prefix MAC or MGF; grade of "C" or higher required)
College Algebra MAC 1105 3
Trigonometry MAC 1114 3
Precalculus Algebra MAC 1140 3
Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry MAC 1147 4-5
Methods of Calculus MAC 2233 3
Calculus for Engineers 1 MAC 2281 4
Calculus for Engineers 2 MAC 2282 4
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 1 MAC 2311 4
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 2 MAC 2312 4
Mathematics for Liberal Arts 1 MGF 1106 3
Mathematics for Liberal Arts 2 MGF 1107 3
Logic PHI 2102 3
Introductory Statistics STA 2023 4

III. Foundations of Science and the Natural World
Scientific principles are behind what we find in nature and in natural occurrences. Scientific issues, such as those dealing with stem-cell research, cloning and global warming, are hotly debated by policy makers.

Courses that meet this requirement share the goal of seeking to understand patterns and principles behind phenomena and occurrences, both in the inorganic world and in the living world. They typically fall within either the physical sciences (astronomy, physics, chemistry and the earth sciences) or the biological sciences.

Students who satisfy the Science and the Natural World requirement will demonstrate:

1. An understanding of the nature of science, including important principles and paradigms;

2. An understanding of the limits of scientific knowledge and of how scientific knowledge changes;

3. An understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry and its ethical standards, in particular how to pose questions and how to develop possible explanations;

4. An ability to discern claims based on rigorous scientific methods from those based on illogical or incomplete scientific methods.

After completion of the associated lab, the student will:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of how experiments are conducted;

2. Be able to analyze resulting data;

3. Be able to draw appropriate conclusions from such data.


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Foundations of Science and the Natural World Courses
(6 credits; two courses, one with a lab, from two different departments)
Introduction to Biological Anthropology ANT 2511 3
Introduction to Biological Anthropology Lab ANT 2511L 1
Introduction to Astronomy AST 2002 3
Life Science BSC 1005 2
LIfe Science Lab BSC 1005L 1
Biological Principles BSC 1010 3
Biological Principles Lab BSC 1010L 1
Biodiversity BSC 1011 3
Biodiversity Lab BSC 1011L 1
Anatomy and Physiology 1 BSC 2085 3
Anatomy and Physiology 1 Lab BSC 2085L 1
Contemporary Chemical Issues CHM 1020C 3
General Chemistry for the Health Sciences CHM 2032 3
Gen. Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab CHM 2032L 1
General Chemistry 1 CHM 2045 3
General Chemistry 1 Lab CHM 2045L 1
Chemistry in Modern Life CHM 2083 3
Engineering Chemistry EGN 2095 3
Engineering Chemistry Lab EGN 2095L 1
The Blue Planet ESC 2070 3
Nature: Intersections of Science, Engineering and the Humanities ETG 2831 3
Physical Geology/Evolution of the Earth GLY 2010C 4
History of the Earth and Life GLY 2100 3
Weather and Climate MET 2010 3
Physics for Engineers 1 PHY 2043 3
General Physics 1 PHY 2048 4
General Physics 1 Lab PHY 2048L 1
College Physics 1 PHY 2053 4
Physical Science PSC 2121 3

IV. Foundations of Society and Human Behavior
The social sciences examine the forms of social activity. They study the social behavior of individuals and organizations, the structure of organizations and institutions and the organization of society. Social science deals with such things as the formation of attitudes; how institutions develop, function and change; how technology transforms society and social institutions; how societies change the environment and respond to environmental change; the relationships between individuals and society; and matters of race, gender, class.

Courses that meet this requirement teach students to understand the complexities of human and societal behavior, to predict future behavior, and to understand the consequences of behavior.

Students who satisfy the Society and Human Behavior requirement will:

1. Be able to identify patterns of human behavior;

2. Demonstrate an understanding of how political, social, cultural or economic institutions influence human behavior;

3. Understand key social science methods and the theoretical foundations behind these methods;

4. Be able to apply social science methods to the analysis of social, cultural, psychological, ethical, political, technological or economic issues or problems.


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Foundations of Society and Human Behavior Courses
(6 credits; two courses from two different departments)
Introduction to Anthropology ANT 2000 3
Macroeconomic Principles ECO 2013 3
Microeconomic Principles ECO 2023 3
Contemporary Economic Issues ECP 2002 3
Disability and Society
EEX 2091 3
Environment and Society EVR 2017 3
Changing Environment of Business, Society and Government PAD 2258 3
Government of the United States POS 2041 3
General Psychology PSY 1012 3
Sociological Perspectives SYG 1000 3
Social Problems SYG 2010 3
Designing the City URP 2051 3

V. Foundations in Global Citizenship
FAU students live in an increasingly diverse region. They also live in a world in which individuals, societies and governments are becoming more and more interconnected. To succeed in this interconnected world, students must have an understanding of diverse cultures and inherited traditions. They must be able to communicate across these diverse cultures. They must understand why societies make the choices that they make, and they must have an awareness of how their actions affect others.

Courses that meet this requirement examine aspects of the diverse human experience (inclusive of issues of race, ethnicity and gender), leading to a better understanding of ourselves and of people from other cultural traditions. Students select courses from the following areas, one of which must be from the global perspectives category: Western Identities or Global Perspectives.

Students completing the Global Citizenship requirement will demonstrate an understanding of:

1. Different individual, cultural and national identities;

2. The economic, political, environmental and/or social processes that influence human action/interaction.

Foundations in Global Citizenship Courses
(6 credits; two courses from two different departments; at least one course must be in the Global Perspectives area)
Western Identities Courses
United States History to 1877 AMH 2010 3
United States History since 1877 AMH 2020 3
Introduction to Latin American Studies
LAS 2000 3
Introduction to Philosophy* PHI 2010 3
Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality SYD 2790 3
Global Perspectives Courses
Culture and Society ANT 2410 3
The Educated Citizen in a Global Context EDF 2854 3
World Geography GEA 2000 3
Introduction to World Politics INR 2002 3
Global Perspectives on Language LIN 2607 3
Global Perspectives of Social Services SOW 1005 3
Global Society SYP 2450 3
History of Civilization 1* WOH 2012 3
History of Civilization 2 WOH 2022 3

* Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) course; grade of "C" or higher required.

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VI. Foundations of Creative Expression

Creative expression is a uniquely human attribute. Through literature, the creative and performing arts, and architecture, individuals and cultures express their values and ideals, as well as explore human potential, the human condition and the imagination.

Students fulfilling the Creative Expression requirement will demonstrate an understanding of:

1. One or more forms/genres of creative expression;

2. The theory or methods behind the creative expression;

3. The social, cultural or historical context of the creative expression(s).

Foundations of Creative Expression Courses
(6 credits; two courses from two different departments)
Culture and Architecture: The Master Builder ARC 2208 3
Art Appreciation ARH 2000 3
Appreciation of Dance DAN 2100 3
Film Appreciation FIL 2000 3
Interpretation of Fiction* LIT 2010 3
Interpretation of Poetry* LIT 2030 3
Interpretation of Drama* LIT 2040 3
Interpretation of Creative Nonfiction
(eff. spring 2013)
LIT 2070 3
Global Great Books
Introduction to World Literature (eff. fall 2013)
LIT 2100 3
History and Appreciation of Music MUL 2010 3
Appreciation of Theatre THE 2000 3

* Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) course; grade of "C" or higher required.

Students assume all responsibility for all graduation requirements.

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Core Curriculum Requirements
(for students matriculating before fall 2009)
A minimum of 36 credits are required.
Communications Requirement
(6 credits; two courses; grade of "C" or better)
College Writing 1* ENC 1101 3
College Writing 2* ENC 1102 3
* Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) course.
Mathematics Requirement (6 credits; two courses from the following list; grade of "C" or better)
Math for the Liberal Arts 1* MGF 1106 3
Math for the Liberal Arts 2* MGF 1107 3
College Algebra* MAC 1105 3
Trigonometry*+ MAC 1114 3
Precalculus Algebra*+ MAC 1140 3
Methods of Calculus* MAC 2233 3
Calculus for Engineers 1* MAC 2281 4
Calculus for Engineers 2* MAC 2282 4
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 1*+ MAC 2311 4
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 2* MAC 2312 4
Introductory Statistics* STA 2023 3
Logic* PHI 2102 3
Note: Students must take at least one course with the prefix MAC or MGF.
* Gordon Rule Computation course.
+ Requires a passing score on placement test before registration. All math courses require a passing score on the ALEKS placement test.
Social Sciences Requirement
(9 credits; three courses from three different disciplines)+
Introduction to Anthropology ANT 2000 3
Culture and Society ANT 2410 3
World Geography GEA 2000 3
Macroeconomic Principles ECO 2013 3
Microeconomic Principles ECO 2023 3
Contemporary Economic Issues ECP 2002 3
Changing Environment of Society, Business and Government PAD 2258 3
Government of the United States POS 2041 3
Introduction to World Politics INR 2002 3
General Psychology PSY 1012 3
Introductory Sociology SYG 1000 3
Social Problems SYG 2010 3
+ The following courses are in the same discipline: ANT 2000 and 2410; ECO 2013, 2023 and ECP 2002; POS 2041 and INR 2002; SYG 1000 and 2010.

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Humanities Requirement
(9 credits; two courses from two different disciplines)+
Interpretation of Fiction* LIT 2010 3
Interpretation of Poetry* LIT 2030 3
Interpretation of Drama* LIT 2040 3
Introduction to Philosophy* PHI 2010 3
History of Civilization 1* WOH 2012 3
and one course from the following list:    
Culture and Architecture:
The Master Builder
ARC 2208 3
Art Appreciation ARH 2000 3
History and Appreciation of Music MUL 2010 3
Appreciation of Theatre THE 2000 3
Appreciation of Dance DAN 2100 3
Film Appreciation FIL 2000 3
* Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) course.
+ The following courses are in the same discipline: LIT 2010, 2030 and 2040.
Natural Sciences Requirement
(6 credits; two courses, one with a lab, from two different disciplines; a higher-level science course may be substituted)+
Introduction to Biological Anthropology ANT 2511&L 3 or 4
Introduction to Astronomy * AST 2002 3
Life Science with Lab* BSC 1005&
BSC 1005L
2 or 3
Biological Principles with Lab* BSC 1010&L 3 or 4
Anatomy and Physiology with Lab BSC 2085&L 3 or 4
Contemporary Chemical Issues* CHM 1020C 3
General Chemistry for the Health Sciences with Lab CHM 2032 CHM 2032L 3 or 4
General Chemistry 1 with Lab CHM 2045 CHM 2045L 3 or 4
Chemistry in Modern Life* CHM 2083 3
The Blue Planet ESC 2070 3
Physical Geology/Evolution of the Earth GLY 2010C
4
The History of the Earth and Life GLY 2100 3
Weather and Climate MET 2010 3
Introduction to Oceanography OCE 2001 3
Physics for Engineers 1 PHY 2043 3
General Physics 1 PHY 2048 3
College Physics 1 PHY 2053 4
Physical Science* PSC 2121 3
* For non-science majors.
+ The following courses are in the same discipline: BSC 1005&L, 1010&L and 2085&L; CHM 1020C, 2032&L, 2045&L and 2083; ESC 2070 and GLY 2010C, 2100 and MET 2010; AST 2002, PHY 2043, 2048, 2053 and PSC 2121.

General Education Requirements for Transfer Students
Students who have fulfilled all general education requirements from any Florida public community college, state college or university will be considered to have met all the requirements of Florida Atlantic University's Intellectual Foundations Program (see above).

Transfer students who matriculate without having met all general education requirements must meet the requirements of the Intellectual Foundations Program. Transfer students matriculating under an existing articulation agreement, however, must meet the requirements outlined in the articulation agreement.


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Foreign Language Graduation Requirement

If required by the student's curriculum (also see Baccalaureate Degree Requirements in this section), this requirement may be met by one of the following:

1. Successful completion of a first-year (two semesters or three quarters), college-level sequence in one foreign language; or

2. With adequate preparation, completion of the second semester (or third quarter) of a first-year, college-level sequence or a higher-level foreign language course (excluding literature in translation); or

3. Achievement of a satisfactory score (for which two semesters of credit are granted) on the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) standardized foreign language examination; or

4. For students educated abroad, certification by the Department of Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature of the originals of documents (appropriate school records or transcripts) attesting that the student's prior secondary and/or higher education was in a foreign language; or

5. Satisfactory completion (by student presenting a language for which no CLEP examination exists) of a standardized examination administered by the Department of Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature; or

6. With adequate preparation, completion of the second semester (or third quarter) of a first-year, college-level sign language sequence, unless specified differently by the college in which the student's major is planned.

Note: As a general guideline for placement purposes, one year of foreign language study at the high school level equates to one semester of foreign language study in college. If a student has taken one year of Spanish in high school for example, that student would normally be expected to enroll in SPN 1121, the second semester of Beginning Spanish Language and Culture. If, however, more than three years have elapsed between the student's high school language study and his/her continuation at FAU, then this guideline may not apply.

Note: This requirement is not identical to the Foreign Language Admission Requirement (see Admissions section elsewhere in this catalog). Some specific degree program requirements may vary. Please refer to the appropriate degree program section for detailed information.

Gordon Rule — Communication and Computation Skill Requirements

Florida Atlantic University has formulated policies and developed curricula to comply with the State Board of Education on "College-Level Communication and Computation Skills," also known as the Gordon Rule. This rule requires students entering college or university study for the first time to successfully complete, with grades of "C" or higher, 12 credits of writing and 6 credits of mathematics as a requirement for admission to the upper division. The 12 writing credits must be distributed as follows: 6 credits of English coursework (College Writing 1 and 2) and 6 credits of additional coursework in which the student is required to demonstrate college-level writing skills through multiple assignments. For the computation requirement, 6 credits of mathematics must be in courses at or above the level of college algebra.

Students transferring from out-of-state institutions who think they may have completed Gordon Rule equivalent courses with grades of "C" or better must obtain a letter from the previous institution that demonstrates they have fulfilled the writing or computation criteria listed above. Such letters should be mailed directly to the Office of the Registrar at FAU.


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Communication Skills — Writing Across the Curriculum
In the spring semester of 2007, FAU implemented its Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program to strengthen the teaching and learning of writing in undergraduate education. The WAC program satisfies and strengthens the Gordon Rule for writing and communication by mandating that:

1. Writing counts for at least 80 percent of the course grade in ENC 1101, ENC 1102 and ENC 1102-substitute courses. For the 2000-to-4000-level WAC courses, writing counts for at least 50 percent of the course grade;

2. Writing assignments engage students in intellectual activities central to the course objectives;

3. Some class time is devoted to discussing strategies for improving student writing;

4. WAC courses include at least one substantial revision of a graded paper;

5. Substantive feedback be provided on all writing that leads to a grade.

A small number of WAC courses have been certified to substitute for College Writing 2. These 1000-level courses have the same requirements as ENC 1102, but are taught by specially trained faculty who use disciplinary readings. The current courses that substitute for ENC 1102 are listed below and are identified as WAC (Gordon Rule) courses in the course schedule. WAC courses in the 2000, 3000 and 4000 level are also listed below and as WAC (Gordon Rule) in the schedule.

The University's WAC program promotes the teaching of writing across all levels and all disciplines. WAC asserts that writing-to-learn activities have proven effective in developing critical thinking skills, learning discipline-specific content and understanding and building competence in the modes of inquiry and writing for various disciplines and professions.

Faculty who teach WAC classes have been specially trained to develop courses that provide frequent and significant opportunities for students to write, revise and discuss their writing. As more courses become WAC-certified, students will have increased opportunities to develop their writing and critical thinking skills from the freshman year through graduation, whatever their major course of study. For more information, contact the University Center for Excellence in Writing by clicking here or calling 561-297-3498.


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The following courses are available to meet the WAC (Gordon Rule) writing requirements. For a list of WAC courses offered through the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College, see that section in this catalog.

WAC (Gordon Rule) Courses Required
(6 credits of English coursework with a grade of "C" or higher):
College Writing 1
(All students must take ENC 1101; there are no substitutes for this course.)
ENC 1101 3
College Writing 2 (Students must take ENC 1102 or one of the substitutes for ENC 1102 appearing below.) ENC 1102 3
WAC (Gordon Rule) substitutes for ENC 1102:
Cultural Difference in a Globalized Society ANT 1471 3
University Honors Seminar in Writing ENC 1930 3
Special Topics: College Writing 2
ENC 1939 3
Honors Composition for Science
ENC 2452 3
Being Cared For: Reflections from the Other Side of the Bed NSP 1195 3
Required (6 credits of additional writing coursework with a grade of "C" or higher):
(Students must choose two of the following courses to meet the remaining writing requirements.)
University Honors Seminars
(various subject areas—prefixes—all with the course number 1930)
XXX 1930 3
Cultures of South Asia ANT 3361 3
Architectural Research Methods
and Analysis
(eff. summer 2012)
ARC 3091 3
Honors Art Appreciation
(eff. summer 2013)
ARH 1930 3
Civil Engineering Design 1
CGN 4803C 3
Civil Engineering Design 2
CGN 4804C 3
Classical Greek Literature CLT 2101 3
Classical Roman Literature CLT 2120 3
From Toys to Engineering EML 2003C 3
Writing for Technical Professions ENC 2248 3
Professional Writing for Management
(Change effective summer 2014.)
ENC 3213 3
Advanced Exposition ENC 3310 3
Principles of Research Writing ENC 4138 3
Writing for Nonprofits ENC 4354 3
Studies in Writing and Rhetoric ENG 4020 3
Communicating Business Information
(Available to Business juniors and higher only)
GEB 3213 3
Topics in Historical Investigation HIS 2934 3
Historical Methods HIS 3150 3
The Birth of Aviation and Its Impact on the 20th Century HIS 4322 3
Senior Seminar HIS 4935 3
Honors Reading Seminar IDH 4931 1-3
Advanced Systems Analysis and Design ISM 4133 3
Italian-American Cinema ITT 3522 3
Interpretation of Fiction LIT 2010 3
Interpretation of Poetry LIT 2030 3
Interpretation of Drama LIT 2040 3
Interpretation of Creative Nonfiction LIT 2070 3
Nursing Research
(No longer WAC eff. spring 2014.)
NUR 4165 3
Senior Seminar in Public Management PAD 4935 3
Introduction to Philosophy PHI 2010 3
Profession of Social Work SOW 3302 3
Rhetorical Analysis of Democracy
(eff. fall 2013)
SPC 4273 3
The Rhetoric of Argument SPC 4517 3
Rhetorical Criticism SPC 4680 3
Writing Social Theory SYA 4511 3
Justice, Health, and the Environment SYD 4513 3
Caribbean Inequalities SYD 4631 3
Planning and Growth Management URP 3000 3
History of Civilization 1 WOH 2012 3
Green Consciousness WST 4349 3

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Computation Skills — Gordon Rule Mathematics

The Gordon Rule mathematics requirement may be satisfied by earning 6 credits from the following list, with a grade of “C” or higher, including at least one course with the prefix MAC or MGF:

College Algebra MAC 1105 3
Trigonometry MAC 1114 3
Precalculus Algebra MAC 1140 3
Precalculus Algebra & Trigonometry MAC 1147 4 or 5
Methods of Calculus MAC 2233 3
Calculus for Engineers 1 MAC 2281 4
Calculus for Engineers 2 MAC 2282 4
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 1 MAC 2311 4
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 2 MAC 2312 4
Discrete Mathematics MAD 2104 3
Differential Equations 1 MAP 2302 3
Topics in Mathematics MAT 1932 1-3
University Honors Seminar in Mathematics MAT 1935 3
Math for the Liberal Arts 1 MGF 1106 3
Math for the Liberal Arts 2 MGF 1107 3
Logic PHI 2102 3
Experimental Design and Statistical Inference PSY 3234 3
Topics in Statistics STA 1932 1-3
Statistics in Practice STA 2022 3
Introductory Statistics STA 2023 3
Intermediate Statistics Lab STA 3163L 1

Note: The mathematics requirement may be partially or completely satisfied by passing the appropriate AP, IB or CLEP examination.

Mathematics Placement Exam

All entering freshmen, as well as entering transfer students with no prior college-level coursework in mathematics, are required to take an online exam (known as ALEKS) to determine placement in their first mathematics course at FAU. It is highly recommended that entering transfer students with prior college-level coursework in mathematics but who need additional mathematics courses also take the exam, though it is not a requirement.

Students may take the exam multiple times, with the highest score used to determine placement. The first attempt may be taken from home with no time limit. All subsequent attempts must be taken in FAU's Office of Testing and Evaluation (either on the Boca Raton campus or the Davie campus) with a two-hour time limit. Students who live outside the area should email testandeval@fau.edu for information on how to take the exam at other testing sites. There is a charge for the exam, which students may pay for by credit card. For more information about the exam and the cost, visit the Mathematics Placement Exam website.

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Application for Degree

Associate of Arts Degrees
Students (both first-time-in-college and transfer students with fewer than 40 credits) may apply for the Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree by the end of the third week of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. Students may not apply for the A.A. degree and a baccalaureate degree in the same semester. Students who receive the A.A. degree do not participate in the commencement programs. For details, see the Associate of Arts Degree Requirements explanation elsewhere in this section. Application forms are available on the Freshman Academic University Advising Services website or by calling 561-297-3064.

Baccalaureate Degrees
A student must apply for a degree using the Application for Degree form provided by the Office of the Registrar by the end of the third week of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. It is the student's responsibility to meet all requirements for the degree. For the specific dates to apply for a degree, refer to the Academic Calendar.

Master's, Specialist's and Doctoral Degrees
Graduate students must apply for a degree no later than the end of the third week of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. Refer to the Academic Calendar for specific deadline dates. 

The date printed in the Academic Calendar is the deadline date for the Application for Degree form to be accepted by the Office of the Registrar. It is the student's responsibility to allow adequate time to obtain signatures AND meet the Application for Degree deadline. Students cannot submit this form directly to the Office of the Registrar; it requires approval by the Graduate College Dean. (Depending upon the graduate program, additional signatures may be required prior to submitting to the Graduate College.)
The Application for Degree form can be found on the Office of the Registrar's website. This form can be submitted prior to the semester a student expects to graduate.

Graduating Student Survey (Effective spring 2014.)
As part of the degree application process, all students are required to complete the Graduating Student Survey. This brief online survey provides a snapshot of the student’s post-graduation plans. University funding is tied to FAU's ability to report this information. All graduating students must complete the survey to obtain their official transcript. The link to complete the survey will be emailed to students two weeks prior to the last day of classes. 

Lower-Division College/Department Requirements/Recommended Courses

Most of the colleges and departments of the University require prerequisites for upper-division transfer and second baccalaureate students. In addition, many colleges and departments recommend courses for their majors. A course may be used to satisfy both a college or department requirement and also a University requirement (e.g., a geology major may use general chemistry to satisfy a Department of Geosciences admission requirement and the general education natural science requirement). The following are the college and department lists of required and recommended courses. In this list, check the college and department in which a major is planned.

Links to Lower-Division Requirements
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters

College of Business

College for Design and Social Inquiry

College of Education

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College

Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing

Charles E. Schmidt College of Science

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The Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters

The Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters offers undergraduate degree programs in Anthropology; Arts and Humanities; Communication Studies; English; History; Jewish Studies; Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature; Multimedia Studies; Music; Philosophy; Political Science; Social Science; Sociology; Studio Art; Theatre; and Visual Arts and Art History. Students should refer to the appropriate desired major in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters section of this catalog for lower-division and major requirements.

It is highly recommended that all College of Arts and Letters majors register for and attend either a freshman or transfer student orientation prior to their initial registration. More information regarding all requirements is available through the college's Office of Student Academic Services, 561-297-3800 (Boca Raton campus), 954-236-1101 (Davie campus) or 561-799-8698 (Jupiter campus).

The College of Business

Students in the College of Business, except Health Administration and General Economics majors, are required to complete the following courses, with a grade of "C" or better in each:

Accounting Principles 1 and 2 (financial and managerial) 6
Business Calculus 3
Computer Principles 3
Economic Principles (macro and micro) 6
Introductory Statistics 3

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The College for Design and Social Inquiry

Majors: Architecture, Criminal Justice, Public Management, Social Work and Urban and Regional Planning

College Requirements
In addition to the University’s general education and degree requirements, students enrolled in the college must successfully complete a major, with a minimum grade of “C” in each major prefixed course. Students must also maintain a minimum grade point average of “C” in all coursework attempted. The College requires completion of cognate work as specified by the major program. A minimum of 45 credits toward the degree must be at the upper-division (3000 and 4000) level.

Architecture
The five-year professional Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) degree is based on a total of 159 credits. Entry into the program is possible at the junior or thesis level, provided the student has presented an acceptable portfolio and completed all prerequisite courses. Students who have completed the A.A. degree with required architecture prerequisite courses at Florida's community or state colleges may enter the B.Arch. program at the junior level and complete 99 credits beyond the A.A. degree. Students who have completed a four-year architecture degree in an approved, accredited institution may enter the B.Arch. program at the thesis level and complete an additional minimum of 33 credits at Florida Atlantic University.

Architecture: Lower-Division Prerequisites
Architectural Design 1 through 4, Architectural
History, Architectural Theory, Structures,
Materials and Methods, Methods of Calculus and
College Physics with Lab (the lab is to be taken
only if the second core science class is taken
without a lab)
24
Required Courses:  
Methods of Calculus 3
College Physics with Lab (lab optional, see above) 4
Recommended Courses:  
Art Appreciation 3
College Algebra (recommended as prerequisite for Methods of Calculus) 3
Trigonometry 3
Criminal Justice: Lower-Division Prerequisites
Required Courses:  
Foreign Language 8
Law, Crime and the Criminal Justice System 3
Statistics 3
Public Management: Lower-Division Prerequisites
Required Courses:  
Government of the U.S. 3
Macroeconomic Principles 3
Information Systems Fundamentals 3
Recommended Courses:  
Microeconomics Principles 3
Principles of Accounting 1 3
Statistics 3
Social Work: Lower-Division Prerequisites
Required Courses:  
Life Science with Lab* 3
General Psychology* 3
Introductory Sociology* 3
Government of the U.S.* 3
Micro- or Macroeconomics* 3
* Statewide requirement for all Social Work programs.
Urban and Regional Planning: Lower-Division Prerequisites
Recommended Course:  
Statistics 3

The College of Education

The College of Education offers undergraduate degree programs in Early Care and Education, Elementary Education, Exceptional Student Education, and Exercise Science and Health Promotion. Students should refer to the appropriate desired major in the College of Education section of this catalog for lower-division and major requirements.

Due to numerous changes in the general education lower-division preparation requirements, it is important for all College of Education majors to register for and attend either a freshman or transfer student orientation prior to their initial registration. More information regarding all requirements is available through the College of Education Office for Academic and Student Services.

The College of Engineering and Computer Science

All entering students must meet University requirements. The Division of Engineering Student Services (561-297-2780) is available to assist students who are undecided as to a major field of study.

The College of Engineering and Computer Science fully complies with the State of Florida Common Prerequisites for Computer Science and Engineering. Students transferring from Florida community or state colleges who have completed these prerequisites and met admission standards will be admitted to the college.

Detailed advising sheets outlining the courses needed at the community or state college and at FAU are available for students transferring from Miami Dade, Broward, Palm Beach and Indian River colleges. These sheets also provide a useful guide for students transferring from other institutions. Students should contact their community or state college advisor or the FAU department in which they intend to enroll.

All students should be aware of academic program graduation requirements (indicated in the departmental listings) that specify certain minimum grades in calculus, physics, and other courses.

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The Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
The Wilkes Honors College, located on the John D. MacArthur campus in Jupiter, offers a four-year academic program resulting in a Bachelor of Arts degree in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Lower-Division (Core) Requirements:
Writing (12 credits, four ‘WAC’-designated courses)

Writing Portfolio

Mathematics (6-8 credits, two courses)

Natural Sciences (6-8 credits, two courses in two distinct disciplines, one of which includes a laboratory section)

Social and Behavioral Analysis (3 credits, one course)  

Culture, Ideas and Values (3 credits, one course)

Literature (3 credits, one course)

Arts (3 credits, one course)


Other Graduation Requirements:
Foreign Language (8 credits, two courses)

Honors College Forum (2 credits, two courses)

Interdisciplinary Critical Inquiry (team-taught) Seminars (5-9 credits, three courses)

International and Environmental Studies (2-6 credits, two courses, one in each area)

Experiential Learning Requirement (Internship or Study Abroad) (3-12 credits)

Distribution Electives (6 credits, two courses, one in the humanities, one in the social sciences)

For further information about core and graduation requirements, see the Honors College section of this catalog.
Also, see www.fau.edu/divdept/honcol/academics_core_graduation.htm


Concentration Requirements:
In addition to fulfilling the Core and other graduation requirements, students must complete the requirements in their concentration or major, which include an honors thesis. Honors College students may concentrate in: American Studies, Anthropology, Art (Transdisciplinary Visual Arts), Biological Chemistry, Biology, Business, Chemistry, Economics, English Literature, Environmental Studies, History (Interdisciplinary), Interdisciplinary Critical Theory, International Studies, Latin American Studies, Law and Society, Marine Biology, Mathematical Sciences (Interdisciplinary), Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Pre-Med, Psychology, Spanish, Women’s Studies or design their own concentration in consultation with faculty advisors. Information about the requirements for each concentration is available at www.fau.edu/divdept/honcol/academics_majors.htm

The Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing

Transfer Students  
General Education Prerequisites:  
English Composition 1 3
English Composition 2 3
Humanities 6
Introduction to Sociology 3
Introduction to Psychology 3
Bachelor of Science in Nursing  
Preprofessional Phase  
Nursing Prerequisites:  
Anatomy and Physiology 1 with Lab 3
Anatomy and Physiology 2 with Lab 3
Microbiology with Lab 3
General Chemistry with Lab 4
Nutrition 3
Human Growth and Development Across the Life Span 3
Gordon Rule Math 3
Statistics 3
Other General Education Courses to Total 60
Bachelor of Science in Nursing  
Professional Program – Four-Year Degree Program  
Core Curriculum, General Education Prerequisite Requirements:
English Composition  
College Writing 1+ ENC 1101 3
College Writing 2+ ENC 1102 3
+ Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) course
Mathematics (6 credits minimum; two courses from the following list, including at least one course with a prefix MAC or MGF; Gordon Rule; must receive a "C" or better):
Math for Liberal Arts 1 MGF 1106 3
Math for Liberal Arts 2 MGF 1107 3
College Algebra MAC 1105 3
Trigonometry MAC 1114 3
Methods of Calculus MAC 2233 3
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 1 MAC 2311 3
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 2 MAC 2312 3
Introductory Statistics or higher level, required STA 2023 3
Social Sciences (9 credits, three courses from three departments):
Introduction to Anthropology ANT 2000 3
World Geography GEA 2000 3
Microeconomic Principles ECO 2023 3
Macroeconomic Principles ECO 2013 3
Contemporary Economic Issues ECP 2002 3
Government of the U.S. POS 2041 3
Introduction to World Politics INR 2002 3
General Psychology* PSY 1012 3
Introductory Sociology* SYG 1000 3
Social Problems SYG 2010 3
* Required for nursing; a grade of "C" or better.
Humanities (9 credits, three courses, choose two courses from two departments):
Interpretation of Fiction** LIT 2010 3
Interpretation of Poetry** LIT 2030 3
Interpretation of Drama** LIT 2040 3
Introduction to Philosophy** PHI 2010 3
History of Civilization 1** WOH 2012 3
** Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) course and choose one from the following five courses:
Art Appreciation ARH 2000 3
Appreciation of Dance DAN 2100 3
Film Appreciation FIL 2000 3
History and Appreciation of Music MUL 2010 3
Appreciation of Theatre THE 2000 3
Sciences (20 credits):    
Anatomy and Physiology 1 with Lab   3
Anatomy and Physiology 2 with Lab   3
Chemistry with Lab   4
Microbiology with Lab   4
Nutrition   3
Human Development   3

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The Charles E. Schmidt College of Science

Major Department Requirements  
Biological Sciences  
General Biology (or Botany and Zoology) 8
General Chemistry with Lab 8
Organic Chemistry with Lab 8
General Physics with Lab 10
Mathematics (including one semester of calculus and statistics) 6-8
Recommended Elective:  
Foreign Language* 8
Chemistry  
General Chemistry 8
Calculus 8
Organic Chemistry 8
General Physics 10
Recommended Elective:  
Foreign Language* 8
Geography  
Required Courses:  
World Geography 3
Introduction to Physical Geography 3
Statistics, recommended 3
Foreign Language Requirement for Geography 8
GeologyBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
General Chemistry with Lab 8
Calculus 8-12
General Physics with Lab 10
Biological Principles (or Botany or Zoology) 8
Recommended Electives:  
Foreign Language* 8
Two lab science courses 8
Computer competency 3
MathematicsBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
Calculus (including Calculus 3) 10
Recommended Electives:  
Differential Equations 3
General Physics with Lab 10
Foreign Language* 8
Fortran or Pascal Programming 3
Linear Algebra 3
Discrete Mathematics 3
Physics Bachelor of Arts  
General Chemistry with Lab 8
Mathematics (including one year of Calculus) 8
General Physics with Lab 10
Recommended Electives:  
Differential Equations 3
Foreign Language* 8
PhysicsBachelor of Science  
Mathematics (including one year of Calculus) 8-12
General Chemistry with Lab 8
General Physics with Lab 10
Recommended Electives:  
Differential Equations 3
Foreign Language* 8
Psychology  
Statistics 3
General Biology or Zoology 3
General Psychology 3
Psychology Elective 3
Recommended Elective:  
Foreign Language* 8

* Alternatively, the requirement may be met by making a satisfactory score on AP, CLEP or IB examinations.

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Graduate Degree Requirements
Graduate students are responsible for knowing and adhering to University policies and procedures pertaining to graduate education. 

Master's Degree General Requirements

The following are general degree requirements for any master's degree at FAU. Students should consult the portion of the catalog dealing with their chosen program for any special or additional requirements.

1. A minimum of 30 credits is required for any master's degree.

2. At least one-half of the credits included in any master's degree program shall be designated as 6000-level courses or above.

3. At least one-half of the credits offered for any master's degree shall be in a single field of concentration.

4. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 is required on all work attempted in a graduate program.

5. If a required thesis or dissertation deals with any federally mandated compliance issues, approval by the appropriate University committee prior to the collection of data is required. Contact the Division of Research for information (561-297-0777).

Master of Arts or Master of Science Degree Requirements
1. A thesis may be required under the supervision of a major professor and a graduate committee, appointed specially for each student by the chair of the major department and with the approval of the dean of the student's college. The thesis must be an original work in the student's major area of specialization. The form of the thesis will follow requirements specified by the college in which it was written; the thesis must follow the Requirements for Graduate Thesis and Dissertation Guidelines, available on the Graduate College website. In general the thesis will comply with the publication requirements of the student's major field. One copy of the thesis is required by the University. Students should check with their graduate advisors concerning the number of additional copies requested by the college. All students submitting master's theses or dissertations will be required to submit an electronic copy to the University library using the library's online submission website. In the case of programs that offer a non-thesis option, these specifications for a thesis do not apply.

2. If required, the student must demonstrate reading knowledge of a foreign language appropriate to the student's area of specialization as determined by the college awarding the degree.

3. The student must complete a minimum of 30 credits beyond the requirements of the bachelor's degree, of which at least 6 credits must be in graduate-level courses in the major. For thesis students, thesis course credit is in addition to this requirement in the major and is determined by the major department. Non-thesis students must complete at least 12 credits in graduate-level courses in their major.

4. A college or department may impose such additional requirements as the faculty may consider desirable, e.g., courses in research methodology, orientation examinations, qualifying examinations or oral examinations in defense of the thesis.

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Master of Arts in Teaching or Master of Science in Teaching Requirements
The University offers the Master of Arts in Teaching degree in the following disciplines: Anthropology, English, French, Geography, Political Science and Spanish.

The University offers the Master of Science in Teaching degree in the following disciplines: Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Economics, Mathematical Sciences and Physics.

Admission Requirements
For admission requirements for these degrees see the Graduate Degree Program Information heading in the appropriate college section in this catalog.

Degree Requirements
1. A minimum of 30 credits (excluding internship) beyond the baccalaureate is required. These include:

    a. A minimum of 18 credits in the major subject, of which 12 must be in graduate-level courses;

    b. A minimum of 6 credits involving the study and report of a significant instructional problem in the major discipline. The thesis may be waived and coursework substituted by the supervisory committee or advisor.
2. An internship worth 6 credits is required.

Master of Fine Arts Degree Requirements
1. Completion of the core curriculum and the area of special concentration is required.

2. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in all work attempted in the graduate program is required.

3. See the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters section of this catalog describing the M.F.A. degrees for additional requirements for graduation.

Second Master's Degree Requirements

A second master's degree will be conferred upon the same individual if the second degree represents at least 30 credits of additional work in residence and if all of the requirements of the college awarding the degree have been fully met.

Supervisory Committee for Master's and Specialist's Degrees
Each graduate student preparing a thesis shall have a supervisory committee comprised of at least three members of the graduate faculty or associate graduate faculty. One of the members shall serve as the chair of the supervisory committee. The supervisory committee shall approve the student's plan of study, monitor the student's academic progress, approve the thesis subject, evaluate the thesis defense and approve the final document. The minor, or related fields, if applicable, shall have representation on the supervisory committee.

Plan of Study for Master's and Specialist's Degrees

1. All degree-seeking graduate students should have an approved Plan of Study on file with the Graduate College no later than halfway through their required coursework and before enrolling in thesis or dissertation credits, if applicable. Students must have an approved Plan of Study on file with the Graduate College prior to the term in which they intend to graduate. All students receive written confirmation when their Plan of Study is approved by the Dean of the Graduate College.

2. Changes to an approved Plan of Study require the submission and approval of the Form 9-Revision to Existing Plan of Study. Revisions need only be filed once and may be submitted during the final term in which the student plans to graduate.

3. A completed Form 12-Research Compliance and Safety must be attached to the Plan of Study form for those students conducting this type of research for their thesis. Any federally mandated compliance issues must be approved by the appropriate University committee prior to the collection of data.


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Doctoral Degree Requirements

Doctoral degrees require at least 80 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree. For specific requirements of individual doctoral programs, see the Doctoral Degree Program Information heading in the appropriate college section. For doctoral requirements in the College of Education, see the following headings: Specialist's Degree Program Information and Doctoral Degree Program Information.

Second Doctoral Degree Requirements

A second doctoral degree will be conferred upon the same individual if the second degree represents at least 80 credits of additional work in residence and if all of the requirements of the college awarding the degree have been met.

Supervisory Committee for Doctoral Degrees
Each doctoral candidate shall have an advisor and a supervisory committee comprised of at least three members of the graduate faculty. One of the members shall serve as the chair of the supervisory committee. The supervisory committee shall approve the student's plan of study, monitor the student's academic progress, approve the dissertation subject, prepare, give, and evaluate the qualifying examination, evaluate the dissertation defense and approve the final document. The minor, or related fields, if applicable, shall have representation on the supervisory committee.

Plan of Study for Doctoral Degrees
1. All degree-seeking graduate students should have an approved Plan of Study on file with the Graduate College no later than halfway through their required coursework and before enrolling in thesis or dissertation credits, if applicable. Students must have an approved Plan of Study on file with the Graduate College prior to the term in which they intend to graduate. All students receive written confirmation when their Plan of Study is approved by the Dean of the Graduate College.

2. Changes to an approved Plan of Study require the submission and approval of the Form 9-Revision to Existing Plan of Study. Revisions need only be filed once and may be submitted during the final term in which the student plans to graduate.

3. A completed Form 12-Research Compliance and Safety must be attached to the Plan of Study form. Any federally mandated research compliance issues must be approved by the appropriate University committee prior to the collection of data.


Admission to Candidacy for Doctoral Degrees
1. Graduate students become candidates for the doctoral degree once they are granted formal admission to candidacy. Such admission requires the approval of the student's supervisory committee, the department chair, the college dean and the dean of the Graduate College. The approval must be based on (a) the academic record of the student, (b) the opinion of the supervisory committee concerning overall fitness for candidacy, (c) an approved dissertation topic and (d) a qualifying examination as determined by the appropriate department/program.

2. Application for admission to candidacy should be made as soon as the qualifying examination has been passed and a dissertation topic has been approved by the student's supervisory committee. By completing Form 8-Admission to Candidacy for the Doctoral Degree, applicants are formally admitted to candidacy. Students must be admitted to candidacy at least one semester before applying for graduation. Students may not register for dissertation credit until they have been admitted to candidacy.

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