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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters

This section of the Preliminary 2015-2016 University Catalog includes revisions received after the 2014-2015 catalog's publish date of June 3, 2014. Revisions appear in red.

Course Descriptions

Anthropology

Caribbean and
Latin American Studies

Communication and
Multimedia Studies

Comparative Studies

English

Ethnic Studies

Film and Video

History


Honors

Humanities

Interdisciplinary Studies


Jewish Studies

Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative
Literature

Philosophy

Political Science

Sociology


Women's Studies



Link to College of Arts and Letters Programs



Anthropology

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Cultural Difference in a Globalized Society (ANT 1471) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or better

Examines cultural differences in three domains of human life: work, marriage relationships and religion. Course is equivalent to ENC 1102 and therefore satisfies the College Writing 2 core course requirement. This is a General Education course.

University Honors Seminar in Anthropology (ANT 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in anthropology.

Introduction to Anthropology (ANT 2000) 3 credits
Anthropology encompasses the study of the prehistoric, historic and contemporary development of humans as both social and biological creatures. This broad framework for studying humankind leads to the division of anthropology into four distinct fields: physical anthropology, archaeology, ethnology and linguistic anthropology. This course surveys those fields, exploring the roots of humanity in the fossil and archaeological record and examining both the great diversity and the similarities among contemporary cultural groups. This is a General Education course.

Lost Tribes and Sunken Continents: Frauds, Myths and Mysteries in Archaeology (ANT 2149) 3 credits
A critical examination of a number of archaeological frauds, myths and mysteries that, using scientific reasoning, assesses the flaws in the purported evidence for each claim.

Culture and Society (ANT 2410) 3 credits
Perspective on the human condition by examining some of the principal cultural differences between traditional and modern societies. Using ethnographic materials, examination of how people formulate their world views (cosmology) and live by the social logics of reciprocity and kinship. These are compared with world views and social logics of markets and bureaucracy in industrial societies. This is a General Education course.

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (ANT 2511) 3 credits
Corequisite: ANT 2511L
Students learn about the general topics in biological anthropology, including genetics, primatology, comparative anatomy and paleoanthropology. This is a General Education course.

Introduction to Biological Anthropology Lab (ANT 2511L) 1 credit
Corequisite: ANT 2511
Students perform procedures similar to those used by professional anthropological researchers and engage in hands-on activities designed to reinforce the material presented in the lecture section. This is a General Education course.

Anthropology Study Abroad (ANT 2952) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Note: The courses above (ANT 1930, 2000, 2410, 2511, 2952) may not be counted for credit in minimum major.

Stones and Bones: Unearthing the Past (ANT 3101) 3 credits
Course examines the concepts, theoretical aspects and methods used in archaeology as well as the practical applications of what is learned about the past.

The Maya and Their Neighbors (ANT 3163) 3 credits
Investigates the ancient cultures of Mexico and northern Central America with an emphasis on the ancient Maya, their calendar and hieroglyphic writing. Also studies their Olmec predecessors and contemporary civilizations in central Mexico, such as Toetihuacan, the Toltecs and Aztecs.

South America Before Columbus (ANT 3165) 3 credits
An introduction to the archaeology and people of ancient South America. Early hunters/gatherers, origins of agriculture and complex societies to the rise and fall of the great Inca civilization.

Real Archaeology (ANT 3190) 3 credits
Course contributes to professional development of archaeology students by teaching them the theory, methods and techniques of public archaeology and cultural resources management. Course includes a review of health, safety and ethics issues in archaeology; international, federal, state and local statutes affecting public archaeology; and hands-on instruction in practical methods.

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Peoples Around the World (ANT 3212) 3 credits
A course in world ethnography involving an inspection of cultural developments, in all their variety, throughout the world. The indigenous culture areas of each continent will be considered, with a focus on livelihood, the social order, religion, music and art.

Anthropology of Religion (ANT 3241) 3 credits
A cross-cultural study of magic and religion with emphasis on belief systems and rituals and their practitioners.

Native-American Culture and Society (ANT 3312) 3 credits
A description and analysis of aboriginal and contemporary North-American-Indian cultures in their historical and ecological contexts.

Cultures of South Asia (ANT 3361) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
The cultural variation in South Asia, comprising the nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan and the Maldives. Religion (Hinduism, Islam and Buddhism), caste and social structure, village dynamics, tribal groups, colonialism and culture change.

Anthropology of Film: An Introduction to Visual Anthropology (ANT 3391) 3 credits
A history and analysis of selected ethnographic films and film makers that give valuable insights into culture and human behavior.

Culture and Ecology (ANT 3403) 3 credits
How humans modify, utilize, conceptualize and are affected by their ecological context. Case studies focus on subsistence and the transformation of energy among food foragers, pastoralists, cultivators and industrial groups.

Human Variation (ANT 3516) 3 credits
An examination of the biological and sociological meaning of race in its application to humans. Processes affecting biological variation in human populations: the mechanisms of biological evolution and the interaction of human genetic factors with culture and the natural environment.

Human Evolution (ANT 3586) 3 credits
An investigation of the biological evolution of the human species. The hominid fossil record is surveyed in conjunction with explanation in terms of the principles of evolution and genetics.

Anthropological Linguistics (ANT 3610) 3 credits
Introduction to the scientific study of language within the context of human culture and society. Examines human versus non-human systems of communication, comparative structure of language systems and relationships between language and culture in cross-cultural perspective.

Archaeological Research Methods (ANT 4116) 3 credits
This course focuses on what archaeologists actually do in the field and laboratory to learn about ancient societies. Methods are placed in context through discussion of scientific research design in archaeology, which determines what methods are chosen, including field methods, analytical methods and laboratory methods.

Development of Ancient Civilization (ANT 4141) 3 credits
An analysis of human cultures from the emergence of humanity through the rise of civilization. An ecological orientation will focus on the close interplay among early humans, their paleoenvironments and the dynamics of culture change. Relevance for modern times in understanding the past and projecting the future. Examination of major archaeological concepts.

Florida Archaeology (ANT 4158) 3 credits
Native-American peoples and cultures of Florida in pre-Columbian times as revealed by the archaeological record. The development of Florida's indigenous cultures is traced from earliest known human occupancy to their disappearance after the European conquest.

Research Methods in Bioarchaeology (ANT 4192) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ANT 4141, ANT 4514 or permission of instructor
Training in the research methodology of biological anthropology and archaeology. Application to an original research project and the presentation of a written research report.

Gender and Culture (ANT 4302) 3 credits
An examination of the variation of gender roles in non-Western societies across different levels of social organization. Femininity, masculinity and additional genders are examined within the context of anthropological theory.

African-American Anthropology (ANT 4315) 3 credits
A review of the most important theoretical issues in African-American anthropology, including Africanisms, the family, matrifocality and religion, with the reading of ethnographic studies of African Americans in the United States.

Human Impulses (ANT 4407) 3 credits
An investigation of worldwide cultural differences in the expression of human propensities: sex, violence and sympathy in anthropological perspective. Implications for theoretical interpretation and understanding.

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Social Anthropology (ANT 4412) 3 credits
Studying society cross-culturally, with a focus on the dynamics of change in different social groupings and application of theoretical principles to a diverse selection of particular cases.

Cultural Anthropology (ANT 4414) 3 credits
Culture: its nature, structure and dynamics; its relation to society and the individual. Tribal cultures as contrasted with state formations, exemplified by several widely varied case studies.

Anthropology of Nature (ANT 4419) 3 credits
Using theory from cultural anthropology, this course examines the relationship between culture and the physical environment or "nature," focusing on political, medical, religious, linguistic/discursive, ecological, development and gender issues in a variety of communities and countries around the world.

Psychological Anthropology (ANT 4433) 3 credits
A study of culture and personality with emphasis on anthropological approaches to childhood development, Oedipus complex, consciousness, rationality and other topics across world cultures.

Medical Anthropology (ANT 4462) 3 credits
Cross-cultural analysis of anthropological theories of health and disease. The status and role of patients and healers in human societies. Biobehavioral approach to human evolutionary adaptation to environment (e.g., belief, taboo, stress, nutrition).

Environment and Disease (ANT 4463) 3 credits
A study of the evolution of human diseases from ancient times to the present. The influence of culture, society and personal behavior will be explored, along with the relationship between the environment and human genetics.

Culture, Gender and Health (ANT 4469) 3 credits
The course examines in a variety of cultures how sex differences and gender inequalities impact the health status of women and men, their access to health care resources and their roles as health care providers. Focused attention is paid to culturally constructed knowledge of the body, gender-based political economy of health care in developing countries, reproductive health, indigenous medical systems and children's health.

Research Methods in Cultural/Social Anthropology (ANT 4495) 3 credits
Training in the research methodology of cultural/social anthropology. Application to an original research project and the presentation of a written research report.

Biological Anthropology (ANT 4514) 3 credits
Biological (physical) anthropology as the study of human biology: human genetics and genetic variation, human anatomy and physiology, human growth and adaptation, and the biological evolution of the human species, together with primatology.

Forensic Anthropology (ANT 4520) 3 credits

Course covers the application of scientific and anthropological techniques to criminal investigations in support of law enforcement, focusing on the skills necessary to carry out a basic analysis of human skeletal remains to determine identity of the decedent and the manner and cause of death.

Primate Behavior (ANT 4552) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ANT 2511
Examination of the types of living primates, their distribution and ecology. Students study general primate behavior as well as behaviors specific to particular groups of living primates.

Primate Evolution (ANT 4554) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ANT 2511
Examination of the evolutionary history of monkeys and apes through the fossil record and molecular evidence. Students learn how to reconstruct primate ancestors through the study of teeth, bones and behavior.

Advanced Topics in Human Evolution (ANT 4592) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ANT 2511
Examination of the fossil record for human evolution and behavior, focusing on how paleoanthropologists reconstruct the lifeways of our early ancestors and collateral relatives.

Ethnographic Fieldwork (ANT 4802) 3-6 credits
Prerequisites: Anthropology major, junior or senior standing and permission of instructor
Supervised fieldwork includes construction of research design, data gathering, interviewing techniques and development of other research skills in a field situation.

Fieldwork in Archaeology (ANT 4824) 3-6 credits
Prerequisites: ANT 2000 and permission of instructor
On-site field experience in methods of archaeological fieldwork, recovery techniques, recording, sampling strategy and survey. The course may include attendance at field schools directed by qualified faculty outside the University, with permission of the department.

Directed Independent Study (ANT 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: For Anthropology majors only or by permission of instructor

Special Topics (ANT 4930) 1-3 credits
Selected topics in Anthropology. Special topics will be categorized by subfield. May be repeated as topics vary.

Anthropology Study Abroad (ANT 4957) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

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Anthropology Graduate Courses

Special Topics (ANG 5930) 1-3 credits
Selected topics in anthropology.

Internship in Anthropology (ANG 5940) 2-4 credits
Apprenticeship experience in museums, nonprofit institutions, governmental agencies or business settings, supervised by an on-site supervisor and Anthropology Department faculty sponsor.

Professional Development (ANG 6001) 1 credit
Course provides knowledge necessary for becoming a professional in the field of anthropology. It covers such information as anthropological ethics, the production of scholarly papers, presentation of conference papers, application for grants and to Ph.D. programs, survival after fieldwork and related subjects. Grading: S/U

Seminar in Anthropological Theory 1 (ANG 6034) 3 credits
Introduction to the history and development of anthropological theory and the interrelationships of theory across the four disciplines of anthropology.

Seminar in Anthropological Theory 2 (ANG 6084) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ANG 6034
Course focuses on contemporary anthropological theory and the interplay between theory and practice in each of the four subdisciplines of anthropology.

Advanced Anthropological Research 1 (ANG 6090) 3 credits
Advanced application of anthropological methods through active application in both field- and lab-based settings.

Advanced Anthropological Research 2 (ANG 6092) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ANG 6090
Course focuses on active student participation in the application of subdiscipline-based research methodologies.

Note: The prerequisite to each graduate-level seminar below is the completion of the corresponding 4000-level course or its equivalent. (This prerequisite does not apply to ANG 6486.)

Seminar in Archaeology (ANG 6115) 3 credits
Archaeological method and theory as well as reconstruction and description of prehistoric cultures.

Seminar in Human Prehistory (ANG 6140) 4 credits
Areal prehistory, emphasizing New World developments. Special topics are included.

Ethnographic Perspectives on Health (ANG 6390) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Culture's role in shaping health and medicine across a range of societies and institutions is critically assessed through in-depth ethnographic examination of the impact ethnicity, gender, politics, technology, religion and class have on people's health status, their access to healthcare resources and their roles as healthcare providers.

Quantitative Reasoning in Anthropological Research (ANG 6486) 3 credits
Introduction to the process of conducting quantitative research in anthropology and developing an anthropological database suitable for statistical application.

Seminar in Cultural Anthropology 1 (General) (ANG 6490) 3 credits
Culture theory in historical perspective.

Seminar in Cultural Anthropology 2 (Topical) (ANG 6499) 4 credits
Cultural area studies: aspects of culture in cross-cultural perspective.

Seminar in Biological Anthropology 1 (ANG 6587) 3 credits
Biology and environment in human existence: theoretical considerations.

Seminar in Biological Anthropology 2 (ANG 6589) 4 credits
Current controversies and major issues in human and non-human primate evolution.

Directed Independent Study (ANG 6905) 1-4 credits

Special Topics (ANG 6930) 1-3 credits
Selected topics in anthropology.

Master's Thesis (ANG 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

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Art Courses
(Listed following the Women's Studies courses, under School of the Arts, Visual Arts and Art History)

Caribbean and Latin American Studies


Undergraduate Courses

The Maya and Their Neighbors (ANT 3163) 3 credits
South America Before Columbus (ANT 3165) 3 credits
(See Anthropology courses, this section)

Latin American Politics (CPO 4303) 3 credits
(See Political Science courses, this section)

Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean (GEA 4405) 3 credits
(See Geosciences courses, College of Science section)

Colonial Latin American History (LAH 3100) 3 credits
Latin American Independence (LAH 3133) 3 credits
Modern Latin American History (LAH 3200) 3 credits
History of Mexico (LAH 4430) 3 credits
History of the Caribbean (LAH 4470) 3 credits
History of Cuba (LAH 4480) 3 credits
Special Topics in Latin American History (LAH 4930) 3 credits

(See History courses, this section)

Introduction to Latin American Studies (LAS 2000) 3 credits
This course is a required introductory course for the Caribbean and Latin American Studies Certificate and is designed to provide students with an understanding of the history, literature and culture of the Latin American region. While drawing on examples from specific Latin American nations, the course is broadly comparative, considering a number of substantive themes as they apply to the entire region and as they are related to world
powers, multinational actors and global economic structures. This is a General Education course.

Caribbean Literatures in English (LIT 4192) 3 credits
(See English courses, this section)

Latin American Culture and Civilization (SPN 3501) 3 credits
Latin American Literature in Translation (SPT 4130) 3 credits
Introduction to Hispanic Literature (SPW 3030) 3 credits

Prerequisite: SPN 2220 or permission of instructor
Latin American Civilization and Literature: Conquest to Modernism
(SPW 3130) 3 credits
Latin American Civilization and Literature: Modernism (SPW 3131) 3 credits

Prerequisites: SPN 2220 and SPW 3030 or equivalent
Latin American Civilization and Literature: Modernism to the Present
(SPW 3132) 3 credits

Prerequisites: SPN 2220 and SPW 3030 or equivalent
Special Topics in Spanish or
Latin American Literature (SPW 4930) 1-3 credits

(See Languages, Linguistics, Comparative Lit. courses, this section)

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Communication and Multimedia Studies


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

University Honors Seminar in Communication (COM 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in communication.

Introduction to Communication and Civic Life (COM 2053) 3 credits
An overview of major approaches to the analysis and criticism of contemporary cultural concerns, situating these within the broader historical contexts of communication and cultural theory.

Introduction to Intercultural Communication (COM 2460) 3 credits
Designed to provide students with a foundation on which to build a study of intercultural communication, the course focuses specifically on concepts related to culture and cultural identities from an intercultural communication perspective.

Communication Study Abroad (COM 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Communication, Gender and Language (COM 3014) 3 credits
Investigation of the role of language in communication by and about women from linguistic, rhetorical and literary perspectives as they relate to differences in female/male communication styles and their implications for female/male gender roles and relationships.

Organizational Communication (COM 3120) 3 credits
Microlevel, institutional and macrolevel analysis of the communication process in organizations. Organizational communication theories, including political economy, critical and poststructuralist approaches.

Communication and U.S. Cultural Studies (COM 3342) 3 credits
High, low and mass culture as they pertain to communication processes in U.S. society. Ethnic, gender-specific and class communication processes within subcultural contexts are examined. Psychoanalytic, social-scientific and critical communication approaches.

Human Communication Theory (COM 3405) 3 credits
Prerequisite: COM 2053
An examination of communication theory from interpersonal, small group, intercultural and organizational viewpoints.

Conflict and Communication (COM 3462) 3 credits
A study of theories and research in interpersonal conflict. Conflict management within personal relationships and in the workplace. The nature of conflict, assumptions arising from conflict, power, styles and tactics, negotiation and transformation.

Political Communication (COM 3500) 3 credits
The role of ideology, language, symbolism and mediation in the practice of American political communication.

Communication Internship (COM 3945) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 18 credits in Communication; 3.0 GPA in Communication courses and overall; permission of department
Practical experience working 12-16 hours per week in a communication-related business or industry. Course culminates in a research paper or project in which student evaluates the experience by methodologies learned in other communication classes. May be repeated for a free elective credit.

Women and Storytelling (COM 4031) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing
Explores how women tell stories and the ways in which women have been controlled through narrative and have themselves controlled narratives about themselves and others, particularly, but not only, with respect to Western history and culture. Through texts, film and in-class activities, we observe the power of master and counter narratives.

Corporate Communication (COM 4201) 3 credits
Instruction and practice in the planning and production of selected modes of oral and written communication common within large corporations, with emphasis on employee newsletters and personal presentations.

Studies in New Media (COM 4332) 3 credits
This course examines the key theoretical works and arguments in the field of new media and considers moments of collision and convergence between media forms.

Rhetoric and Aesthetics of Contemporary Culture (COM 4411) 3 credits
Analyzes ways our world is informed by rhetorical discourses as they are informed and shaped by contemporary aesthetics and the production, management and distribution of style, particularly as it is portrayed in popular culture. Considers the relationship between rhetoric and aesthetics and arenas of life undergoing renewed stylization.

Performance, Culture, Identity (COM 4419) 3 credits

Prerequisite: Junior and senior standing
An introduction to a communication-centered approach to performance studies, with a focus on both theory and application. In addition to studying the work of major theorists, students have an opportunity to create, observe, discuss and evaluate aesthetic and non-aesthetic performance.

Non-Verbal Communication in a Diverse Society (COM 4461) 3 credits
Course focuses on the significance of non-verbal behavior when communicating across cultures. Non-verbal messages from a variety of cultures are examined. These cultures include, but are not limited to, age, race, gender, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, the physically and mentally challenged or any groups that have not received peripheral attention in discussions of non-verbal communication.

New Media and Civic Discourse (COM 4603) 3 credits
Prerequisite: COM 2053

Explores how new media technologies change what communities we can be members of and how we perform our roles in those communities. Also explores the potential of new media to affect citizenship and alter what it means to be a member of a democratic society and electorate.

News Media Ethics (COM 4621) 3 credits
A critical examination of news media ethical issues and dilemmas through the use of case studies and current news reports. Course also includes critique of print, broadcast and online news coverage using ethical theory and standard journalistic ethical principles.

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Storytelling (COM 4703) 3 credits
Historical development and cultural significance of storytelling as a basis for the discipline of communication. Oral performance of a variety of storytelling styles and techniques.

Family Folklore (COM 4704) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors only
Students learn to define the terms: oral tradition, folklore, folk narrative and family memorate; discover the importance of family folklore both to individuals and to society; learn the prompts that elicit family stories; practice folklore collection, classification and analysis; and prepare and execute a family folklore presentation.

Peace, Conflict and Oral Narrative (COM 4707) 3 credits
Theory and methodology behind conflict resolution and peace-building techniques that employ storytelling, with a strong emphasis on learning and creating stories.

Directed Individual Project (COM 4903) 1-2 credits
An individual communication project, approved in advance by the directing faculty member. Grading: S/U

Directed Independent Study (COM 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and 16 credits in Communication
Opportunity for extensive library study in a specific area of communication. Research paper required.

Directed Independent Honors Study (COM 4907) 3 credits
Reading and research in selected areas of communication done in context of individualized Honors Program of study.

Special Topics (COM 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Some Special Topics courses may require permission of instructor
The study of a special area in communication. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Communication Study Abroad (COM 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Senior Honors Thesis in Communication (COM 4970) 3 credits
Completion of an honors thesis under faculty supervision. Permission of instructor required.

Fundamentals of Multimedia (DIG 3110) 4 credits
This production course explores a range of ideas and processes incorporated in multimedia projects. Class assignments introduce elements of image making, multipage sequencing and interface design. The class develops a combination of critical, technical and design skills.

Digital Video Editing (DIG 3207) 4 credits
Prerequisite: RTV 3260 or DIG 3110 or DIG 3305C with minimum grades of "C"
An intensive study of the technical and aesthetic elements of non-linear digital video editing. Students learn strategies for media management, image capture, sequence creation, title creation, working with audio, video effects and compositing.

Digital Audio Recording and Editing (DIG 3253C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: DIG 3110 or DIG 3305C or RTV 3260 with minimum grades of "C"
Comprehensive overview of the basics of using digital audio equipment in a studio environment to record and edit audio. Students are introduced to audio systems, audio/video post-production, audio editing and surround sound mixing using software packages. Sound design theory is covered.

Fundamentals of 3D Computer Animation (DIG 3305C) 4 credits
An exploration of the basic creative principles and techniques of 3D computer character modeling and animation.

Advanced 3D Computer Animation (DIG 3306C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: DIG 3305C
Teaches the fundamental principles of animation, both computer and classical, including advanced techniques in character animation and dynamic scene design using advanced software. Emphasis on techniques such as keyframes, motion paths, inverse kinematics, procedural animation and scripting. Includes storyboarding for animation.

Advanced 3D Computer Modeling for Animation (DIG 3323C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: DIG 3305C
Provides a thorough foundation of 3D modeling, texturing and rendering techniques for computer animation using advanced software. Emphasis placed on such techniques as 3D curves, patches, meshes, surfaces, B-splines, polygonal tools, digital scene development, computer sculpture, texture mapping, shading and rendering.

History and Theory of Computer Arts and Animation (DIG 4026) 4 credits
A detailed overview of history, development and theories behind the medium of animation from the beginning of the 20th century, with cel animations to the latest advances in computer graphics. Each student writes a critical essay concerning the importance of a specific animation to the development of computer art.

Advanced Digital Compositing for Animation (DIG 4394C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: DIG 3305C
Trends and techniques in digital compositing to combine photographic video imagery with computer-generated animation. Students gain a thorough understanding of matting, keying, transitions, timing, color manipulation, compression and special effects. Advanced animation and related compositing software are used.

Narrative Video Production (DIG 4412) 4 credits
Prerequisites: RTV 3260 with minimum grade of "C"; Multimedia Studies majors only
Explores the methods of narrative film and video production and facilitates the development of personal voice and point of view. Students will develop their communicative skills and their unique visual styles through film and video, exploring and transmitting their raw, personal experience and utilizing the medium in a manner that effectively communicates their original ideas as filmmakers and media artists.

Video Game Studies (DIG 4713) 3 credits
An overview of the interdisciplinary academic study of video games, analyzing games as interactive media, rule-based systems, cultural and social texts, designed learning spaces, arenas of play and products of industrial discourse and design.

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Web Research for Journalists (DIG 4820) 3 credits
The course offers students the opportunity to explore the vast amount of information available on the Internet and immerse themselves in online research. This enables students to evaluate web sites to determine which sites are trustworthy and have reliable sources of data that could add depth and context to news stories.

Senior Seminar: Portfolio in Computer Arts in Animation (DIG 4950C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Senior standing in studio art
Prepares students for a career in computer arts or to seek graduate admission. Expands skills in 3D modeling, animation, and digital compositing. Students interview industry professionals on-site, present a class seminar, and organize a video/multimedia exhibit. Guest lecturers review student work and advise on career opportunities.

Film Appreciation (FIL 2000) 3 credits
Introduction to film as an art form, cultural product and social artifact. Basic analytical and technical terms, concepts and issues. Development of critical skills. This is a General Education course.

Film Analysis (FIL 2001) 3 credits
Introduces students to the various elements of film form and to how those constituent parts create meaning. Presents the fundamental vocabulary and concepts necessary for analyzing individual films and groups of films.

New Hollywood (FIL 3674) 3 credits
Examines Hollywood as an industry, its structures and policies in the production, distribution and exhibition sectors. Global expansion of Hollywood and its power relations between the U. S. government, Canada and other governments are considered.

Film Theory (FIL 3803) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FIL 2000
Examination of the major topics in film theory, including structuralism, psychoanalysis, feminism and Marxism, as well as debates about realism. Historical perspective on film theory and insight into its intersection with other disciplines.

Bollywood: The Exotic and The Erotic (FIL 3836) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FIL 2000
Introduction to the world's largest and most dynamic film industry that has come to be a distinct cultural marker for India in the 21st century. Students examine cinematic conventions and their relationship to India's diverse culture, history and arts.

Film to the 1940s (FIL 4036) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FIL 2000
History of film, 1890s to 1940s. Theoretical, industrial and social aspects of film in a variety of national and cultural contexts. Emphasis on narrative and avant-garde styles and traditions.

Film since the 1940s (FIL 4037) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FIL 2000
May be taken before FIL 4036. History of film, 1940s to the present. Theoretical, industrial and social aspects of film in a variety of national and cultural contexts. Emphasis on the dominant tradition of narrative realism and various modernist alternatives.

Women and Film (FIL 4056) 3 credits
Examination and history of film representations of and by women as they relate to issues of feminism, psychoanalysis, ideology and film style. Narrative, documentary and avant-garde forms in historical context. Feminist film theory. (May be taken for credit in Women's Studies Program.)

Radical Film, New Media and Social Movements (FIL 4058) 4 credits
Explores political activism and the socioaesthetic media processes and products of various activist media groups. Interrogates the pitfalls and promises that accompany such radical media movements and analyzes the ways in which they employ film and new media as more than simple commodities.

Scriptwriting (FIL 4106) 4 credits
Formal elements of writing for film and television; preparation of proposals and scripts with emphasis on conception, structure, characterization and format.

Documentary Film and Video (FIL 4364) 4 credits
Survey of the diverse forms and historical functions of non-fiction films and video throughout the world, Analysis of representative and significant texts; discussion of issues of style, ideology, technology, determination.

Hollywood, Censorship, and Regulation (FIL 4672) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FIL 2000
This course embeds U.S. practices of film production, distribution and exhibition within a wider sociocultural framework of censorship and regulation to reveal the domestic and international pressures that affect not only what U.S. audiences will see but also how they will see it.

Studies in Asian Cinema (FIL 4843) 3-4 credits
Intensive introduction to a style, director, genre, national tradition or other aspect of Asian cinema. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Film Criticism (FIL 4851) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FIL 2000
An overview of major approaches to film criticism such as filmmaker, genre, national cinema, political criticism and cultural studies. Students will apply critical models to analysis of films

News and News Reporting (JOU 3101) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Multimedia Journalism majors only, ENC 1101, ENC 1102 and passing score on Journalism Skills Test
Advanced practice in news gathering and reporting. Readings in journalism.
(Changes effective fall 2014.)

U.S. Journalism (JOU 4004) 3 credits
How news is defined and managed in the United States. Close analysis of newspapers, television news and magazines. Historical development of journalistic practices within cultural formations.

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Coverage of Public Affairs (JOU 4181) 3 credits
Prerequisite: JOU 3101, Multimedia Journalism majors only and passing score on Journalism Skills Test
Instruction and experience covering government, school, the courts and other major institutions. Critical analysis of examples of public affairs reporting. Projects in investigative reporting.
(Changes effective fall 2014.)

Editing and Layout (JOU 4223) 3 credits
Prerequisite: JOU 3101
Copy editing and elements of layout and design for the advanced student.

Feature and Freelance Writing (JOU 4311) 3 credits
Prerequisite: JOU 3101
The writing of newspaper features and magazine articles of professional quality. Analysis of conventional and alternative journalistic forms.

Environmental Journalism (JOU 4314) 3 credits
Prerequisite: JOU 3101
This course introduces environmental reporting, with emphasis on the Everglades and the rest of South Florida's ecosystem. Topics include writing about nature, dealing with public agencies and private activist groups and obtaining and using government data.

Multimedia Journalism (JOU 4342) 3 credits
Prerequisites: JOU 3101 and JOU 4181 with grades of "C"or better; Multimedia Journalism majors only
Teaches the skills and understanding necessary to produce news stories across media platforms—print, broadcast and online. As the technical boundaries among media become less distinct, students must be prepared to enter the rapidly changing media environment.

Photojournalism (JOU 4601) 4 credits
A practical and critical overview of photojournalism through exploratory photo essays, with an emphasis on multimedia applications. Training in still camera and digital media, with a consideration of the basic principles and ethics of visual journalism and its role in social and political change.

American Media, Society and Technology
Introduction to Multimedia Studies (MMC 1540) 3 credits
A survey of the history, technology and social role and impact of the media in America.
An introduction to the transformation of newspapers, magazines, film and video to digital multimedia platforms - based on technological innovations and internet advertising strategies.
(Course changes effective fall 2014.)

Mass Communication Theory (MMC 3403) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MMC 1540
A study of the research and various theories dealing with the structure of media and its social impact.

Minorities and the Media (MMC 3601) 3 credits
A historical analysis of images of minorities in television programming and in motion pictures; the origin of social stereotypes, their relationship to societal development and an examination of other alternatives.

Interactive Multimedia (MMC 3711) 4 credits
An introduction to the basics of interactive multimedia production. Class projects explore the potential of interactive media to communicate, express and challenge cultural ideas. The course seeks to develop a combination of critical, technical and design skills.

Mass Communication Law and Regulation (MMC 4200) 3 credits
A study of the relationship of the mass media to contemporary law. Topics covered include the First Amendment, libel, privacy, reporters' rights and broadcast and advertising regulation.

Media, Culture and Technology (MMC 4263) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MMC 3403 or permission of instructor
An examination of the historical relationship between technology, society and the development of the mass media. An examination of the social, technological, economic and cultural factors shaping the development of media technology with particular emphasis on current new media.

International Communication (MMC 4301) 4 credits
An examination of current issues in international communication with particular emphasis on the political/communication/media relations between developed and Third World countries.

Visual Media Criticism (MMC 4501) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MMC 1540 or FIL 2000
Introduction to social and critical cultural analysis of visual media culture.

Mass Communication in North American Social Thought (MMC 4502) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MMC 1540
A survey of the intellectual history of communication in North American social thought. Through readings, lectures and discussions, the course provides students with a broad historical understanding of American and European emigre social thinkers and intellectual and research endeavors involving "mass" communication from the late 1800s to the 1970s.

Public Opinion and Modernity (MMC 4640) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MMC 3403 with a grade of "C" or better
Conceptual and historical study and analysis of the construction and representation of public opinion as idea and sociopolitical formation in the West from the 1800s to the present.

Communication and Social Power (MMC 4642) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MMC 1540
Theoretical and historical examination of the political and economic relationships between public and privately controlled media organizations, policy-making and regulatory institutions and the broader culture and society.

Media, Representation and Diversity (MMC 4704) 3 credits
A theoretical and critical exploration of representation in or related to media institutions, texts, technologies and users, exploring race/ethnicity, nationality, gender, class, age, sexuality and ability.

New Media Narrative (MMC 4713) 4 credits
Explores traditional and alternative storytelling using new media tools and paradigms. Encourages experimentation while developing critical, technical and design skills. Taking inspiration from film, video, animation, comics, art and literature, the class creates collaged, multiperspective, modular and multiparticipant narratives.

Public and Community Relations (PUR 4411) 3 credits
Prerequisite: JOU 3101 or equivalent
Public relations writing and campaign planning, including audience analysis, persuasive strategies, campaign management, media relations, evaluation of outcomes.

Television Production (RTV 3228C) 4 credits
A lecture-laboratory course with active participation in the planning and production of broadcast programming. An introduction to studio equipment and operations with an emphasis on the aesthetics and politics of both network and non-commercial TV.

Experimental Video Production (RTV 3229) 4 credits
Prerequisite: RTV 3260 with minimum grade of "C"
Investigation of video as an experimental art form through exploratory production exercises. A guide through the fundamental issues in the theory and practice of video art, with an introduction to the history of the medium.

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Video Production (RTV 3260) 4 credits
Basic principles of visual and audio communication with an introduction to field production techniques and equipment. Hands-on projects facilitate the development of personal voice and point of view.

Documentary Video Production (RTV 3332C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: RTV 3260 with minimum grade of "C"
Research, writing and production challenges of non-fiction video. Organizing and writing proposals, treatments and scripts, with basic training in equipment and techniques of video production.

Broadcast Journalism (RTV 4301) 4 credits
Prerequisites: JOU 3101 and JOU 4181 with grades of "C" or better; Multimedia Journalism majors only
Instruction in gathering, writing, editing and delivering of broadcast news. Analysis of broadcast journalism as organizational activity.

Advanced Broadcast Journalism (RTV 4304) 4 credits
Prerequisite: RTV 4301 with a grade of "C" or better
Advanced instruction in gathering, writing, editing and delivery of broadcast news. Advanced analysis of broadcast journalism as organizational activity.

Television Studies (RTV 4400) 3 credits
A critical overview of contemporary broadcast and cable television, this course examines the history of broadcasting from its beginnings in the 19th-century imagination and considers changes in program content and form at specific points in American history.

U.S. Telecommunication Industry (RTV 4403) 3 credits
An investigation of the forces acting upon the telecommunication industry in the United States. Telecommunication is examined from historical, technological, economic, regulatory and sociological perspectives.

Gender and Television (RTV 4412) 3 credits
Historical, theoretical and analytical exploration of gender and television in terms of the structures, preferences and commercial imperatives of media institutions, representational dimensions of texts, producers and creators, and viewer readings and uses in everyday life.

Discovering Human Communication and Rhetoric (SPC 1340) 3 credits
A survey of the history and nature of contemporary communication and rhetorical processes.

Interpersonal Communication (SPC 2300) 3 credits
Readings, exercises and projects in dyadic communication. Analysis of interpersonal interaction with focus on message variables.

Public Speaking (SPC 2608) 3 credits
Theory and practice in the common forms of public address.

Classical Rhetoric (SPC 3233) 3 credits
Prerequisite: COM 2053
A historical and theoretical survey of rhetoric in Western civilization from Homer to the Renaissance.

Contemporary Rhetoric (SPC 3235) 3 credits
Prerequisite: COM 2053
A historical and theoretical survey of rhetoric from the Enlightenment through the 21st century.

Rhetorical Foundations of Publics and Counterpublics (SPC 3272) 3 credits
Prerequisite: COM 2053 with minimum grade of "C"
Introduces students to the broad range of theoretical perspectives on publics and counterpublics. Topics include the public sphere, identity, social advocacy and public judgment.

Small Group Processes (SPC 3425) 3 credits
Readings, exercises and projects in dyadic and small group analysis involving interpersonal attraction, message variables, personal perception, leadership and problem-solving techniques.

Rhetorical Theories of Persuasion (SPC 3542) 3 credits

Prerequisite: COM 2053 with minimum grade of "C"
Introduces students to the broad range of theoretical perspectives on persuasion as it operates to structure human relationships, shape attitudes and perceptions and constitute various cultural formations.

American Multicultural Discourse (SPC 3704) 3 credits
An exploration of the rhetorical practices of multicultural Americans utilizing rhetorical criticism as a tool to study the persuasive efforts of multicultural discourse in the United States.

Intercultural Communication (SPC 3710) 3 credits
Examination of the intracultural and intercultural communication differences within and between culturally diverse groups in the United States.

Intercultural Theory (SPC 3717) 3 credits
Prerequisite: COM 2053
Students observe the nature of intercultural theory, review various dialogues and theories among scholars of differing perspectives on this topic and explore the knowledge, motivation and skills needed for developing and/or enhancing intercultural competence.

Studies in Rhetoric (SPC 4232) 3 credits
A sustained critical treatment of select rhetorical practices. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Capstone in Communication and Civic Life (SPC 4271) 3 credits
Prerequisites: COM 2053 and 18 credits in the major; Communication Studies majors only
Provides the experienced student of communication with an opportunity to reflect on disciplinary concepts and examine the influential role communication plays in nurturing democratic practices, recognizing and valuing diversity and training active, responsible citizens. Includes a semester-long civic engagement project.

Rhetorical Analysis of Democracy (SPC 4273) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: COM 2053 with minimum grade of "C"

Surveys major methodological perspectives that consider the constitutive relationship between rhetorical practice and democratic politics, political culture, rhetorical citizenship and civic engagement.

Leadership and Communication (SPC 4443) 3 credits
This course is an analysis of the function of communication and its influence on leadership from a global perspective. Students are exposed to leadership as a product of symbolic communication by using both theories and practice to demonstrate that leadership competence results from communication competence.

Argumentation and Debate (SPC 4513) 3 credits
A preliminary survey/review of principles of argument followed by an in-depth study of and practice in oral argument and formal debate.

Rhetoric of Argument (SPC 4517) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Study of selected classical and contemporary theories of argument and style as a means of improving student's ability to understand, analyze and create argumentative discourse.

Propaganda (SPC 4540) 3 credits
The theories and dynamics of persuasion and the history and techniques of propaganda in democratic societies.

Rhetoric of Social Protest (SPC 4633) 3 credits
An examination of the various approaches—psychological, sociological, historical—to the study of social and political movements with special emphasis on rhetorical criticism of movements. In-depth analysis of protest in the United States and its effect on politics and culture.

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Rhetorical Criticism (SPC 4680) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: SPC 1340 or COM 2053

An overview of major contemporary approaches to the analysis and criticism of public discourse. Students apply the methods by writing critiques of contemporary oral and written discourse.

Gender, Race and Communication (SPC 4712) 3 credits
An investigation of the relationships between discursive practices and cultural concepts of gender and race. Theories of gender and race differences as well as cultural myths, hegemony and personal, political and religious power are examined.

Ethnicity and Communication (SPC 4718) 3 credits
A comparative analysis focusing on communication patterns among different cultural groups living within the United States. May be repeated with a change of content.

Multimedia Practicum (VIC 4943) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This interactive multimedia practicum brings video, audio, text, animation and new media to a multifunction, Department-hosted website. As part of this capstone experience, students will create cross-media content, producing works engaged with art, culture and cross-disciplinary critical inquiry.

Communication and Multimedia Studies Graduate Courses

Exhibition Practices in Film, Video and New Media (ART 6684) 4 credits
Prerequisite: M.F.A. graduate standing in Media, Technology and Entertainment
Introduces students to a number of exhibition techniques and practices for film, video, media, sound and installation art. Course explores the fundamental forms, structures and ideas behind film and video exhibition. It exposes students to the process involved in curatorial duties, administrative responsibilities and programming detail for screenings.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Studies in Gender and Sexuality (COM 6015) 3 credits

Selected forms of analysis of the issues of gender and sexuality presented from different communication perspectives utilizing feminist and other theoretical approaches. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Quantitative Communication Research (COM 6316) 3 credits
Quantitative research in communication, emphasizing experimental design and statistical methods in content analysis and survey study.

Qualitative Communication Research (COM 6340) 3 credits
Qualitative research in communication, with emphasis on ethnographic, focus group, interview and semiotic methods.

Cultural Analysis (COM 6341) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of department
Selected forms of critical analysis applicable to contemporary cultural communication. It includes presentation and critique of student work. May be repeated for credit.

Introduction to Graduate Study in Communication (COM 6400) 3 credits
An examination of the nature of human communication through analysis of major areas of advanced study, theories of the field and forms of research utilized in communication study.

Communication and Modern Cultural Theory (COM 6402) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of department
A selective overview of modern cultural theory as it applies to production and reception of communication forms.
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)

Intercultural Communication Theory (COM 6415) 3 credits
An overview of the theories about intercultural communication between people of different cultures. Theories will be generated to describe or explain how communication varies across cultures.

Communication Theory (COM 6424) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Corequisite: COM 6400

Broadly surveys theoretical traditions in film studies, intercultural studies, media studies and rhetorical studies. Topics include communication traditions, texts, audiences, practices and contributions to social change.

Political Communication (COM 6511) 3 credits
Analysis of communicative factors in the facilitation, manipulation and discouragement of public political involvement.

Communicating Ethically in Intercultural Settings (COM 6626) 3 credits
Provides a rationale for communicating ethically in intercultural settings with an understanding of the cultural patterns (values, beliefs and norms) practiced by groups of people. Emphasis is placed on the ways one can communicate effectively and efficiently with others in a global society.
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)

Directed Independent Study (COM 6906) 1-3 credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of department
(FIL 6906) (RTV 6906) (MMC 6906)
(JOU 6906) (SPC 6906)
Intensive studies in areas of Communication mutually agreed upon by student and instructor.

Special Topics (COM 6931) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of department
(FIL 6931) (MMC 6931) (SPC 6931)
(JOU 6931) (RTV 6931)

Theory and Practice of Teaching Communication (COM 6944) 3 credits
Required of and restricted to Graduate Assistants. Helps teaching assistants develop skills in introductory courses taught or assisted by teaching assistants under faculty supervision.

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Master's Thesis (COM 6971) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to degree candidacy
(FIL 6971) (MMC 6971) (SPC 6971)
(JOU 6971) (RTV 6971)

Interactive Interface Design (DIG 6605) 4 credits

Introduces design interactive interfaces for software and hardware. By emphasizing a conceptual approach toward interacting with technology, students learn creative coding techniques using the processing language and Arduino microcontroller. These techniques bridge the gap between design, technology, engineering and art.

Film History and Historiography (FIL 6026) 3 credits
Prerequisites: A study of film at the undergraduate level and the completion of an undergraduate degree with at least the equivalent of a minor in film or media studies
Seminar where students present talks on selected topics and write papers of publishable length on issues in film history and historiography. This is a core requirement in most university-level graduate film programs in the US.

Video Production Workshop (FIL 6365) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate students in M.F.A. in Media, Technology and Entertainment
Explores the basics of film and video production in its most fundamental form. Gives participants a general introduction to film and video production, providing historical, technical, conceptual, artistic, aesthetic and theoretical insight into the medium. A number of video projects will be produced throughout the term.

Experimental Cinema (FIL 6409) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate students in M.F.A. in Media, Technology and Entertainment
Introduces students to nonfiction experimental and abstract film and video. Explores the fundamental forums, structures and ideas behind experimental film and video. Students are exposed to the processes involved in experimental production and develop the skills involved in the research and planning of nonfiction, abstract film and video.

Film Theory and Criticism (FIL 6807) 3 credits
Advanced introduction to the field of film studies surveying various approaches, including neoformalism, feminism, poststructuralism, neo-Marxism and cultural studies. Dominant and oppositional modes.

Studies in Film and Television (FIL 6935) 3 credits
An examination of current issues in film and television studies, to include new approaches in theory, history and criticism. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Programming for Interactivity (IDC 6506) 4 credits
Covers the creation of new media artwork and the use of creative coding. Explores the artists that utilize code, the significance of this work and how their work has been created. Also explores designing hardware and software with the goal of exhibiting this work as interactive art.

Journalism, News Media and the Public Agenda (JOU 6318) 3 credits
The journalistic process of researching, analyzing and reporting the public agenda in the context of the pressures resulting from the news media's institutional structures as well as the public policy objectives of diverse interest groups.

International Journalism in a Multimedia Environment (JOU 6345) 3 credits
The course offers a comparative analysis of the changing coverage of international news. It highlights the rapid advances in media technologies and the emergence of international media organizations.

Mass Media Theory (MMC 6408) 3 credits
Study of theories of mass media and their application and development through research.

Public Opinion and Modernity (MMC 6645) 3 credits
Discussion of conceptual and historical construction and representation of public opinion and the public sphere and their relationships to modern mass media and popular democracy from the 18th century to the present, particularly the 20th century.

Political Economy of the Media (MMC 6646) 3 credits
Organization and structure of the U.S. media industries, labor, technological developments and global expansion. Special emphasis is placed on the changing conditions of the U. S. political economy, considering changes in competition, monopoly, regulation, public policy and the role of the state.

Feminist Cultural Studies (MMC 6705) 3 credits
Prerequisite: COM 6402
An examination of the area of feminist cultural studies covering issues of gender, power and ideology with a focus on the various types of theory and critical analysis applicable to artifacts of communication.
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)

Creating Interactive Culture (MMC 6707) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Course explores the intersection of expressive and communicative media with technology, as well as the new aesthetics and practices that are emerging around user interaction. Through collaboration and experimental production, candidates examine interactive media and culture from the perspective of hybrid processes and structures, often expanding the notions of performance, installation, intervention and presentation.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Studies in New Media (MMC 6715) 3 credits
A critical examination of key theoretical works and arguments in the field of new media and an investigation of the cultural implications of new technologies.

Television and Video Studies (RTV 6006) 3 credits
A critical investigation of the history of television and video, the social contexts of production and reception, questions of ontology and the relationship between broadcasting and the public sphere.
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)

Gender and Screen Cultures (RTV 6417) 3 credits
Exploration of intersections between and among cultures of film, television, video, computer-mediated communication and everyday life as they manifest, maintain and/or challenge power relations of gender.

Classical Rhetorical Theory (SPC 6234) 3 credits
An in-depth examination of primary texts and central issues in rhetorical theory in Western civilization from Homer through St. Augustine.

Contemporary Rhetorical Theory (SPC 6236) 3 credits
An in-depth examination of primary texts and central issues in the development of rhetorical theory in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Seminar on Kenneth Burke (SPC 6239) 3 credits
Examines the life and work of American rhetorical theorist and critic Kenneth Burke (1897-1993). It takes a developmental approach to studying Burke, with emphasis on his understanding of rhetoric and symbolic actions as they are reflected in his theories of “Dramatism” and “Logology” as well as his approaches to critical practice.

Feminist Rhetorical Theory (SPC 6639) 3 credits
A study of feminist rhetorical history, theory and expression. Readings and discussion will (a) reveal the absence of women's voices in rhetorical history and theory; (b) investigate contextual factors that created this absence; and (c) introduce feminist constructs of rhetorical theory that reclaim women's place in the rhetorical tradition.

Rhetoric and Democracy in Societies in Transition (SPC 6648) 3 credits
A study of the relationship of rhetoric and democracy in communist and post-communist countries in eastern and central Europe. Readings and discussion examine dissent and democratic discourse as part of the contemporary rhetorical tradition.

Rhetorical Criticism (SPC 6682) 3 credits
An overview and analysis of contemporary methods of rhetorical criticism. Presentation and critique of student work.

Intercultural Communication (SPC 6715) 3 credits
An examination of intracultural and intercultural similarities and differences in communication patterns of various specified groups.

Studies in Rhetoric (SPC 6934) 3 credits
An examination of current issues in the field of rhetorical studies. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Topics in Intercultural Communication Studies (SPC 6935) 3 credits
An examination of current issues in the field of intercultural communication. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

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Comparative Studies

Graduate Courses

Prerequisites for all courses in this program: Admission to Ph.D. program in Comparative Studies or permission of instructor.

The Public Matters 1 (CST 7101) 3 credits
The Public Matters 2 (CST 7102) 3 credits

The Public Matters 1 and 2, a two-semester sequence, explore the problems that engage public intellectuals in the contemporary world. Required core courses for the Public Intellectuals program.

Language Theory (CST 7110) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Examines issues of and approaches to the theory of language from a comparative point of view. May be repeated for credit.

Aesthetics and Philosophy of the Arts (CST 7205) 3 credits
Examines fundamental issues in philosophical aesthetics, such as the definition of art, the nature of artistic expression, the social value of art and the basis for evaluation of artworks. The aim is to teach the student to think philosophically and critically about the value of visual and performing arts.

Analytical and Creative Studies in the Arts (CST 7206) 3 credits
Course participants examine the history, process and expression of a specific creative epoch to develop an understanding of its contributions to music, theatre and the visual arts and how these artistic expressions are interconnected.

Music Core: Concepts, Culture and Creation (CST 7207) 3 credits
Uses a conceptually based holistic approach to acquaint graduate students with the elements, historical epochs and cultural contexts of music. Students are encouraged to forge comparative connections to other artistic expressions.

Art Core: A Thematic Study (CST 7208) 3 credits
Seeks answers to the following questions: What is art? What distinguishes the visual arts from the other art forms? What relates the visual arts to other art forms? Students are exposed to a wide range of visual forms, media and styles in the search for a comparatively based answer to these questions.

Theatre Core: Performance Theory and Practice (CST 7209) 3 credits
This course focuses on a broad spectrum of international and American theatrical performance traditions as seen through a flexible framework of interdisciplinary methodologies.

The Arts (CST 7301) 3 credits
Courses in this area explore the relations between the arts today and the role of the arts historically in shaping ideas and social movements. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Creative Strategies (CST 7302) 3 credits
Courses in this area are devoted to the analysis of creative intervention in the imagination of people and conscience of cultures. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Gender (CST 7303) 3 credits
Courses in this area address the various issues at stake for gender today through a survey of social movements, public sexuality and its relation to the structures of desire, as well as through theoretical and historical analysis. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Media and Popular Culture (CST 7304) 3 credits
Explores the relations between news and entertainment, how the media informs thinking and has informed American politics and democracy. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Postcolonialism (CST 7305) 3 credits
Courses in this area address new conceptions of history, the emergence of national literatures of developing nations, new strategies of reading and questioning the notion of progress. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Public Policy (CST 7306) 3 credits
Courses in this area address the understanding of public policy processes, the idea of the "public" presupposed in public policy and its relation to public intellectuals. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Race and Ethnic Conflict (CST 7307) 3 credits
Courses in this area explore the struggle of oppressed groups, the achievements of this struggle and race in context of other forms of prejudice. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Spirituality (CST 7308) 3 credits
Courses in this area focus on the extraordinary range and impact of spirituality, theology and religions on modern publics. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Theory and Criticism (CST 7309) 3 credits
Examines critical and theoretical issues and approaches to various analyses of texts of different types from an historical and comparative point of view. Topics may include structuralism, poststructuralism, semiotics, gender, race and ethnicity and postcolonialism. Variable subtitle. May be repeated up to four times.

Technology, Economy, Globalization (CST 7311) 3 credits
Courses in this area address the diverse theories that radically connect the three areas of study by focusing on issues such as development and the impact of economic growth on the one hand and the production of poverty on the other. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Directed Independent Study (CST 7905) 1-3 credits
Directed doctoral-level study in an area of comparative studies.

Advanced Research and Study (CST 7910) 1-9 credits
Course for Ph.D. students who have completed all required courses but have not been admitted to candidacy. Intended for preparation of dissertation topic. May be repeated, and may be taken for variable credit. Grading: S/U

Special Topics (CST 7931) 1-3 credits
Doctoral-level study in a selected area of comparative studies. May be repeated for credit under variable titles and content.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives (CST 7936) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Arts and Letters or permission of instructor
Variable topic course emphasizing the interdisciplinary focus that is at the foundation of the Cultures, Languages and Literatures track of the Ph.D. in Comparative Studies. Content varies from semester to semester but invariably serves to guide students in approaching cultural texts and formations from a multidisciplinary perspective. May be repeated up to four times.

Practicum (CST 7940) 3-9 credits
Engagement and collaboration with agencies and organizations in the public arena, as defined by the student's research interests. Projects initiated by the student may also be considered. Grading: S/U

Dissertation (CST 7980) 1-12 credits

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English

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

American Literature to 1865 (AML 2010) 3 credits
An overview of American literature, including representative writers of the Colonial, Enlightenment and Romantic periods.

American Literature from 1865 (AML 2020) 3 credits
An overview of American literature including representative writers of the Realist, Naturalist, Modernist and Postmodernist movements.

American Novel: 19th Century (AML 3111) 3 credits
Major novels by such writers as Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Crane and James.

American Novel: 20th Century (AML 3121) 3 credits
Major novelists selected to reflect a wide range of 20th-century experience; typically: Faulkner, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Singer, Hurston and Erdrich.

Southern Literary Renaissance (AML 3263) 3 credits
Prose, drama and poetry by 20th-century Southern writers.

Florida Women Writers (AML 3265) 3 credits
Course explores 19th- and 20th-century women writers in Florida, including Douglas, Rawlings, Hurston, Smith and others.

Colonial and Early American Literature (AML 4213) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with a grade of "C" or better
A study of colonial and early American literature from 1600 to 1800.

American Literature: 19th-Century Traditions (AML 4223) 3 credits
Close reading of representative works exemplifying the major traditions in American literature, including naturalism, romanticism, realism and others.

American Literature: 20th-Century Movements (AML 4242) 3 credits
Overview of selected texts relevant to the emergence and definition of 20th-century American literary movements, such as modernism and postmodernism. Writers will be studied in social and historical contexts and may include James, Cather, Eliot, Faulkner, O'Connor, Bellow, Morrison and Nabokov.

Major American Writers: 19th Century (AML 4311) 3 credits
Significant works of poetry, long and short fiction and non-fiction prose from 1800-1900, by significant American writers.

Major American Writers: 20th Century (AML 4321) 3 credits
Works representing main currents of modern American thought and literature.

African-American Literature to 1895 (AML 4604) 3 credits
An introduction to African-American literature and culture through prose and poetry from 1746-1895.

African-American Literature 1895 to Present (AML 4607) 3 credits
An introduction to African-American literature from the late 19th century to contemporary times.

U.S. Latino/a Literatures (AML 4630) 3 credits
An introduction to U.S. Latino/a literatures, with emphasis on Cuban-American, Puerto Rican and Mexican-American traditions.

American-Indian Literature (AML 4640) 3 credits
Interpretation of traditional oral narratives, songs and oratory as well as contemporary fiction and poetry. Emphasizes both cultural continuity and creative adaption of Euro-American presence.

Jewish-American Literature (AML 4663) 3 credits
An introduction to Jewish-American literature and culture through the work of several major and emergent 20th-century Jewish-American writers.

Asian-American Literatures (AML 4673) 3 credits
An introduction to Asian-American literary traditions and histories.

Special Topics (AML 4930) 3 credits
Special topics in North American literature in English. May be repeated for credit.

Comparative Literature of Cultural China (CHT 4500) 3 credits
An exploration of literature and film by Chinese and Chinese descendents from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, France, United States, etc. All literary and cinematic texts are in English or in translation.

Creative Writing (CRW 3010) 3 credits
Guidance and criticism for beginners in writing prose fiction and poetry.

Fiction Workshop 1 (CRW 4120) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CRW 3010
Concentrates on essentials of the short story form through emulations of varied modern authorial styles. Point of view, narrative form, voice, creating characters, tone and atmosphere are some of the topics covered. Students write several stories, revise and critique. Reading consists of single-author collections and anthology selections. Course may be repeated for credit once.

Fiction Workshop 2 (CRW 4121) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CRW 3010
Workshop for advanced students. Reading consists of single-author works and anthology selections. Students may be asked to write in a variety of forms and will critique peer work. Course may be repeated for credit once.

Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (CRW 4211) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CRW 3010
Application of creative techniques to non-fiction subjects in essay and autobiographical writing. Includes study of works by master non-fiction writers and themes in non-fiction literature. Course may be repeated for credit once.

Poetry Workshop 1 (CRW 4310) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CRW 3010
Offers a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of writing poetry. By the end of the semester the student will have been introduced to such tools of poetic language as diction, connotation and word music; such techniques of poetic form as meter, stanza, enjambment and free-verse lineation; and such tools of poetic vision as image, metaphor and analogy. Course may be repeated for credit once.

Poetic Forms (CRW 4311) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CRW 3010
Students develop appreciation for poetic forms by writing sestinas, sonnets, villanelles, blank verse and a variety of other forms. Emphasis on contemporary poets experimenting in medieval, Renaissance, 17th-century forms and romantic forms such as the ode.

Poetry Workshop 2 (CRW 4321) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CRW 3010
Workshop for advanced students. Individual projects critiqued in workshop sessions and in conference with the instructor. Visiting writers may participate in workshop sessions. To stimulate the student's development, other arts, especially music and the visual arts, may be explored. Course may be repeated for credit once.

Special Topics: Creative Writing (CRW 4930) 3 credits
Prerequisite: CRW 3010
Selected special topics, e.g., visions of nature or special readings and techniques. May be repeated for credit.

Honors Creative Writing Seminar (CRW 4932) 3 credits
Prerequisites: CRW 3010 and two 4000-level workshops with minimum grades of "B+" and permission of instructor
Provides a structured framework for students in the Creative Writing Honors track to complete their honors thesis (either a work of fiction, nonfiction or a collection of poetry). Provides information about post-graduate opportunities for creative writers. Examines works of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction in more depth and with more of an eye toward craft than may have been possible in previous coursework.

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College Writing 1 (ENC 1101) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Reading examples of effective expository prose and writing essays practicing the forms of rhetoric. This is a General Education course.

College Writing 2 (ENC 1102) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or better

A continuation of College Writing 1. This is a General Education course.

University Honors Seminar in Writing (ENC 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or better
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in writing. This is a General Education course.

Special Topics: College Writing 2 (ENC 1939) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with grade of "C" or above

Selected special topics for College Writing 2, e.g. Southern Cultures or Contemporary Creative Non-Fiction. This is a General Education course.

Writing for the Technical Professions (ENC 2248) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or substitute with a grades of "C" or better
An introduction to technical and professional writing. Students analyze various rhetorical situations and ultimately compose documents that achieve a specific purpose and meet the needs of a particular audience. Students write in a variety of technical genres and practice skills valuable in the sciences, including clarity, conciseness and correctness.

Professional Writing (ENC 3213) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with a grade of "C" or better

Prepares the student to write professionally for audiences within and outside a corporation or nonprofit enterprise. Proofreading skills stressed.

Advanced Exposition (ENC 3310) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with a grade of "C" or better

A study of rhetorical techniques, including principles of classical rhetoric.

Principles of Research Writing (ENC 4138) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with a grade of "C" or better

Provides an introduction to communicating research through writing.

Writing for Nonprofits (ENC 4354) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or substitute with a grades of "C" or better
Engages students in the study and practice of professional writing activities with local nonprofit organizations. Students receive Academic Service-Learning credit by working with a local nonprofit organization for at least two hours each week. They become familiar with the kinds of writing necessary to support nonprofit organizations and the various rhetorical circumstances that shape organizations working and writing for social change. Students also research a specific community issue or problem related to their partnering organization.

Special Topics: Composition (ENC 4930) 3 credits
Special topics in composition studies. May be repeated for credit.

Introduction to Literary Studies (ENG 3822) 3 credits
A prerequisite for English majors that must be taken before or concurrently with any 4000-level course. Prepares students to enter the field of literary studies by introducing three genres, key concepts and two-to-three critical approaches to literature. Topics vary depending on instructors.

Studies in Writing and Rhetoric (ENG 4020) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: ENC 1101, ENC 1102 or substitute with grades of "C" or better

Examines the theory and practice of rhetoric with special attention to contemporary developments in rhetoric and their applicability to writing.

Literature and Film (ENG 4114) 3 credits
The study of film representations of British and American literary works. Emphasizes narrative techniques and strategies for adapting literary works for the cinema.

Honors Research (ENG 4910) 3 credits
Prerequisites: ENG 4932; ENG 3822 or LIT 3212; Honors in English students only
Facilitates the writing of the honors thesis, which is the culmination of the English honors student's study and an integral part of the requirements for the "Honors in English" designation. Aims to expose students to the standards and best practices of research-level literary scholarship and to provide a supportive forum in which they can draft, edit and finalize the honors thesis. In order to accomplish these aims, class sessions include such activities as discussions and presentations on different analytical and research methodologies, library research visits and peer editing workshops.

Honors Seminar (ENG 4932) 3 credits
Prerequisites or corequisites: ENG 3822 and LIT 3213

Required for honors students but open to those interested in more advanced literary study. Allows students to synthesize literary knowledge and critical skills gained in the English major. More intensive and interactive than the Department's other courses and organized in ways that anticipate graduate-level courses. Topics of the seminar change from year to year. Offered once a year in the fall.

English Internship (ENG 4940) 1-6 credits
Prerequisites: 18 credits in the major; 3.0 GPA overall and in English; permission of instructor
Practical experience working 10-15 hours per week in a writing and/or reading oriented position relevant to the English major. Possible internship sites include publishing houses, government agencies, public relations firms, museums, libraries, computer information systems, advertising agencies, and law firms.

British Literature to 1798 (ENL 2012) 3 credits
Major works, writers and movements of early British literature.

British Literature since 1798 (ENL 2022) 3 credits
Major works, writers and movements of modern British literature.

English Study Abroad (ENL 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

British Novel: 18th Century (ENL 3112) 3 credits
Selected novelists from Daniel Defoe to Ann Radcliffe.

British Novel: 19th Century (ENL 3122) 3 credits
Selected novelists from Jane Austen to Thomas Hardy.

British Novel: 20th Century (ENL 3132) 3 credits
Major British and Irish novelists from Conrad to the present; emphasis on innovations in technique.

Backgrounds for British and American Literature (ENL 3425) 3 credits
Provides crucial backgrounds, allusions, themes, "histories" and other elements that are contexts for British and American literary works. Topics include the Bible as literature, Greek and Roman classics, epic, mythology, diaspora, ancient literary criticism, ancient non-Western literature, science and literature and metamorphosis.

Medieval Literature (ENL 4210) 3 credits
From Anglo-Saxon epic (Beowulf) to courtly romance (Sir Gawain).

Renaissance Literature (ENL 4220) 3 credits
Selected readings that may be organized by genre (drama, poetry, epic, romance), theme (the lover as hero, the rise of humanism, classical revisions) or as a broad-based historical overview of the period and concept of the Renaissance. Writers may include Spenser, Marlowe, Sidney, Jonson.

17th-Century Literature (ENL 4221) 3 credits
Representative writers from Donne through Dryden.

18th-Century Literature (ENL 4230) 3 credits
Major prose, poetry, drama and satire of the 18th century.

British Romanticism (ENL 4243) 3 credits
A study of major poets of the Romantic period, including prose writing, theory and fiction.

Victorian Literature (ENL 4251) 3 credits
A study of Victorian literature and culture from Dickens to Kipling. Major works of poetry and prose of the Victorian period are studied in their historical and cultural contexts.

Victorian Genres and Themes (ENL 4264) 3 credits
A study of major literary genres and themes of the Victorian period. Content varies by semester.

20th-Century British Literature (ENL 4273) 3 credits
Focuses on British literature from World War I to the end of the 20th century, concentrating on the major movements of modernism and postmodernism. Literary works by Lawrence, Woolf, Eliot, Pinter, Lessing and others will be studied in social and historical contexts, such as the women's and working-class movements, race and immigration and the end of empire.

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Chaucer (ENL 4311) 3 credits
The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, the dream allegories.

Shakespeare (ENL 4333) 3 credits
Representative plays.

Milton (ENL 4341) 3 credits
Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes and other works, including the prose.

Special Topics: British Literature (ENL 4930) 3 credits
Special aspects of British Literature. May be repeated for credit.

English Study Abroad (ENL 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Structure of Modern English (LIN 4680) 3 credits
Comparative grammatical analysis of the structure of English prose styles of major writers; traditional, structuralist and transformational approaches critically examined.

University Honors Seminar in Literature (LIT 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in literature.

Interpretation of Fiction (LIT 2010) 3 credit
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with grade of "C" or above

An introduction to close reading of fiction. This is a General Education course.

Interpretation of Poetry (LIT 2030) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with grade of "C" or above

An introduction to close reading of poetry. This is a General Education course.

Interpretation of Drama (LIT 2040) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with grade of "C" or above

An introduction to close reading of drama. This is a General Education course.

Interpretation of Creative Nonfiction (LIT 2070) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with minimum grade of "C"
An introduction to the history and interpretation of nonfiction. Focuses on a variety of sub-genres of creative nonfiction, such as autobiography and memoir and literary journalism and the essay (including non-traditional forms like the lyric or graphic essay). Provides students with the tools to read, analyze, think critically and write about creative nonfiction and to communicate their insights in oral and written forms. This is a General Education course.

Introduction to World Literature (LIT 2100) 3 credits
A variable topics course focusing on perennial aspects of human experience through the comparative study of world literature. This is a General Education course.

Literature Study Abroad (LIT 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Modern Drama (LIT 3043) 3 credits
Traditions in dramatic literature: Realist, Naturalist, poetic, experimental (absurdist, etc.).

Irish Literary Renaissance (LIT 3184) 3 credits
Fiction, poetry and drama by major writers from the Irish Literary Renaissance to the present. Special emphasis on Yeats, Joyce, Beckett and Heaney.

Literary Theory (LIT 3213) 3 credits
Introduces various schools of critical and literary theory to bear upon the interpretation of literary texts, e.g. new criticism, psychoanalysis, myth studies, poststructuralism, phenomenology, feminism, postcolonialism, Marxism, etc.

Fantasy Literature (LIT 3312) 3 credits
Selected readings in 19th- and 20th-century fantasy, drawn from Lord Dunsany, George MacDonald, Charles Williams, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Lewis Carroll, E.R. Eddison, L. Frank Baum, Fritz Leiber, Ursula K. Le Guin, Jane Yolen.

Science Fiction (LIT 3313) 3 credits
Selected readings in 19th- and 20th-century science fiction, drawn from Mary Shelley, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Theodore Sturgeon, Samuel Delany, Ursula K. Le Guin, Orson Scott Card.

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Literature of Adolescence (LIT 3333) 3 credits
A survey and selection of literature representing genres and themes appropriate for the adolescent reader. Issues and research chosen from available scholarship. Intended to assist meeting teacher certification requirements.

Detective Fiction (LIT 3344) 3 credits
Analysis of short stories and novels from Edgar Allan Poe to modern times; division into classical, hard-boiled and contemporary forms.

Literary Genres (LIT 4001) 3 credits
Analysis of a literary genre in historical context. May be repeated for credit.

Modern Poetry (LIT 4032) 3 credits
Formal and semantic aspects of 20th-century poetry in English.

Comparative Literature (LIT 4061) 3 credits
Selected topics requiring investigation of related literary and intellectual movements across national boundaries, with particular attention to writers of international significance.

Contemporary Dramatic Literature (LIT 4094) 3 credits
Dramatic literature of the 20th century, primarily British and American, concentrating on such playwrights as Pinter, Mamet and Shepard.

Caribbean Literatures in English (LIT 4192) 3 credits
Focuses on the critical and analytical study of representative Caribbean authors writing in English.

World Literature: Critical Approaches (LIT 4225) 3 credits
Critical approaches to selected works in major world literatures, Eastern and Western, including, e.g., archetypal, traditional or contemporary interpretations.

Postcolonial Literature (LIT 4233) 3 credits
An introduction to the field of postcolonial studies, especially the historical development and major debates surrounding the genre.

Major Writers of World Literature in English (LIT 4244) 3 credits
Course allows an in-depth exploration of particular major English-language writers from Africa, Asia, Canada, the Caribbean, Ireland and/or Oceania.

Black Literatures (LIT 4355) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ENC 1102 or substitute with grade of "C" or better
Introduces students to literature of the African Diaspora and seeks to make connections between diverse works from various countries that speak to issues such as identity, blackness, ancestry and the relationship between nation and diaspora. Also focuses on debates in African Diasporic studies, including how scholars should define and think about the African Diaspora.

Women in Literature (LIT 4383) 3 credits
A critical and thematic study of women in literature. May include fiction, poetry or drama, British, American or world literature.

Literature and the Environment (LIT 4434) 3 credits
An exploration of the various ways in which American and/or British writers have engaged with the natural and/or "constructed" environment in their work. Genres may include fiction, non-fiction prose and poetry.

Literature and Social Movements (LIT 4484) 3 credits
Considers how literature has influenced and been influenced by social movements. Topics may include literature in relation to such movements as abolition, the British labour movement, women's suffrage, the Civil Rights movement, anticolonialism and decolonization, the gay rights movement, Third Wave feminism, the anti-globalization movement or the rise of the New Left.

Comparative European Romanticism (LIT 4604) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, Spanish or Italian
Romanticism as a European movement. Study of representative poetry and prose in French, German and English literatures with emphasis on literary and intellectual relations. Readings in Rousseau, Goethe, Novalis, Chateaubriand, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Mary Shelley, Eichendorff, Lamartine, Hugo.

Literature of War (LIT 4605) 3 credits
Examines major themes, genres and stylistic modes in war writing. Considers works from American, British and other literatures. Topics may include the history of war literature, war poetry, propaganda and reportage, black humor and literature and culture of the World Wars, the Vietnam War and other wars.

Asian Literature in English (LIT 4832) 3 credits
Focuses on the critical and analytical study of representative Asian authors writing in English.

Special Topics (LIT 4930) 3 credits
Special topics in comparative literature. May be repeated for credit.

Literature Study Abroad (LIT 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

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English Graduate Courses

All graduate courses in the Department of English have the following prerequisite: Admission to a graduate program in Arts and Letters or permission of instructor. This prerequisite is in addition to any prerequisite listed with the courses below.

* With different content may be repeated for credit.

* Studies: Literary Periods (AML 5505) 3 credits
Period or movement of American literature, historically based, e.g., American Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Colonial.

* Literary Genres and Themes (AML 5937) 3 credits
(U.S.) Might include, e.g., U.S. Hard-boiled Detective Fiction, The American Novel, American Drama, U.S. Utopian/Dystopian Fiction.

* Individual Author (AML 6305) 3 credits
Intensive study of one American writer, e.g., Faulkner, Dickinson, Twain, James, O'Connor, Morrison.

* Directed Independent Study (AML 6905) 1-3 credits

* Special Topics (AML 6934) 3 credits
Special topics in American literature.

* Seminar: American Literature (AML 6938) 3 credits
More than one author is considered, but the focus is intensive, often concentrating on literature of one region and/or ethnic group, e.g., Southern, Wharton and Chopin, Jewish American, African American, Native American. With different content, may be repeated for credit.

Master's Thesis (AML 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

* Creative Writing Workshop (CRW 5025) 3 credits
Concentration on a mode of writing fiction, poetry or drama.

* Creative Writing: Genre and Form (CRW 6024) 3 credits
Literary theory, criticism, literature and creative writing considering forms, genres and styles not covered in the genre workshops, e.g., writing the poetic sequence, libretti, novella, novel in verse, translation, dramatic monologue.

* Fiction Writing Workshop (CRW 6130) 3 credits
Advanced composition in fiction writing, consideration of significant examples of novel and story forms. Aims at perfecting a series of short stories or novel chapters, improving critical abilities.

* Creative Non-Fiction Workshop (CRW 6236) 3 credits
Advanced composition in creative non-fiction writing, consideration of significant examples of memoir, essay and literary journalism forms. Course aims at perfecting a series of personal essays or chapters in a book-length non-fiction narrative, improving critical abilities.

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* With different content may be repeated for credit.

* Poetry Writing Workshop (CRW 6331) 3 credits

Advanced composition in poetry writing, consideration of significant examples of poetic forms. Aims at perfecting a series of poems, improving critical abilities.

Creative Writing Symposium (CRW 6920) 1 credit
A creative writing workshop focusing on areas relevant to the M.F.A. curriculum. Course topics vary by semester and instructor and are offered in fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.

Master's Thesis (CRW 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Studies in Composition Methodology and Theory (ENC 6700) 3 credits
Review and discussion of recent scholarship in the teaching of composition, with an emphasis on practical applications in the classroom. Required for and restricted to graduate assistants teaching composition for the first time. May count toward the 24 credits of coursework required for the MA degree.

* Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (ENC 6930) 3 credits
Composition theory and practice across a range of topics, such as reading/writing connections, sites or praxis, computers and composition, research in composition studies, literary theory and social consequences, writing in the disciplines, assessment and evaluation, history of composition studies and survey of composition theories.

Master's Thesis (ENC 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Literary Criticism 1 (ENG 5018) 3 credits
Literary critical theory from Plato to the 18th century.

Literary Criticism 2 (ENG 5019) 3 credits
Major themes and theoretical statements of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Principles and Problems of Literary Study (ENG 6009) 3 credits
Research and methodology; problems of textuality and critical assumptions; history of ideas.

* Seminar: Theory and Criticism (ENG 6049) 3 credits
Focuses on theoretical approaches to literature, e.g., structuralism, deconstruction, formalism, gender studies, Marxism, New Historicism, postcolonialism, speech acts; or critical themes such as Mimesis or the Sublime.

* Directed Independent Study (ENG 6906) 1-3 credits

English Symposium (ENG 6920) 1 credit
Focuses on a specific topic in areas relevant to the English master's program.

* Research Colloquium (ENG 6924) 3 credits
For increasing research skills and developing methodological approaches, anticipating formal work in master's thesis. May count as an elective beyond the 24 credits of coursework specified in the catalog. Grading: S/U

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* Colloquium in English (ENG 6925) 3-6 credits
For English Department teaching assistants, discussion and evaluation of materials and methods of undergraduate English instruction; participation in appropriate Departmental workshops and colloquia. May count as an elective beyond the 24 credits of coursework specified in the catalog. Grading: S/U

* Seminar: Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy (ENG 6933) 3 credits
Focuses on the theory and practice of written composition as it affects issues such as the teaching of writing, the relationship of rhetoric and poetics and the development of cultural literacies. Variable content.

Master's Thesis (ENG 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

* Studies: Literary Periods (ENL 5505) 3 credits
Period or movement of British literature, historically based, e.g., Medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, Victorian, Modern.

* Literary Genres and Themes (ENL 5937) 3 credits
(British) Might include, e.g., Rise of the Novel, Renaissance Lyric, Renaissance Drama, Gothic Literature.

* Individual Author (ENL 6305) 3 credits
Intensive study of one British writer, e.g., Chaucer, Jane Austen, George Eliot, William Blake, Virginia Woolf.

* Seminar: British Literature (ENL 6455) 3 credits
More than one author is considered, but the focus is intensive, often concentrating on literature of one region and/or ethnic group, e.g., Scottish Literature, Sidney and Spenser, Celtic Literary Culture.

* Directed Independent Study (ENL 6905) 1-3 credits

* Special Topics (ENL 6934) 3 credits
Special topics in British literature.

Master's Thesis (ENL 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

History of the English Language (LIN 6107) 3 credits
Development of the language from Old English to the present, utilizing modern linguistics.

* Special Topics (LIN 6934) 3 credits

Master's Thesis (LIN 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

* Literary Genres and Themes (LIT 5009) 3 credits
Might include, e.g., Satire, Epic, Autobiography, Literature and the Environment, Myth, Migration Literature, Metaphor, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Detective Fiction.

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* With different content may be repeated for credit.

* Seminar: World Literature in English (LIT 6105) 3 credits

More than one Anglophone author is considered, but the focus is intensive, often concentrating on literature of one region and/or ethnic group, e.g., Caribbean, Canadian, Irish, Asian.

* Individual Author (LIT 6246) 3 credits
Intensive study of one Anglophone writer, not U.S. or British, e.g., Yeats, Walcott, Atwood.

* Individual Author: Science Fiction/Fantasy (LIT 6315) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIT 5009 or LIT 3313
Focus on the fictional works of a single author of science fiction/fantasy to produce critical familiarity, encourage research and writing for publication.

Theorizing Science Fiction/Fantasy (LIT 6318) 3 credits
The use of science fiction metaphors by contemporary theorists as informed by contemporary science fiction texts.

Reading for Comprehensive Exams (LIT 6900) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Course provides graduate students who have elected to pursue the comprehensive exam option in the English M.A. or M.A.T. program rigorous guidance in preparing for that exam. In close consultation with their exam committee chair, students work through at least half of their reading list during each semester taking this course. May be repeated for credit.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

* Directed Independent Study (LIT 6905) 1-3 credits

* Special Topics in Science Fiction and Fantasy (LIT 6932) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in Arts and Letters or permission of instructor
A selection of science fiction/fantasy exploring a theme or motif, such as cyborg culture, utopia/dystopia, urban fantasy/mythology, etc.

* Seminar: Special Topics (LIT 6934) 3 credits
Specialized aspects of literature, including non-British or non-American Anglophone literature and world literature in English translation.

* Seminar: Literature and Other Fields (LIT 6936) 3 credits
Literature and, e.g., film, visual art, history, philosophy, psychology, linguistics.

Master's Thesis (LIT 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

* With different content may be repeated for credit.

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Ethnic Studies


Undergraduate Courses

History of American Immigration and Ethnicity (AMH 3530) 3 credits
African-American History to 1877 (AMH 3571) 3 credits
African-American History since 1877 (AMH 3572) 3 credits
Class, Gender and Race in the American Community since 1900 (AMH 4318) 3 credits
The Civil Rights Movement (AMH 4575) 3 credits
American-Indian History (AMH 4580) 3 credits
History of Southeastern Indians (AMH 4581) 3 credits

(See History courses, this section)

African-American Literature to 1895 (AML 4604) 3 credits
African-American Literature 1895-Present (AML 4607) 3 credits
U.S. Latino/a Literatures (AML 4630) 3 credits
American-Indian Literature (AML 4640) 3 credits
Jewish-American Literature (AML 4663) 3 credits
Asian-American Literatures (AML 4673) 3 credits

(See English courses, this section)

Native-American Culture and Society (ANT 3312) 3 credits
Cultures of South Asia (ANT 3361) 3 credits
Gender and Culture (ANT 4302) 3 credits
African-American Anthropology (ANT 4315) 3 credits
Cultural Anthropology (ANT 4414) 3 credits

(See Anthropology courses, this section)

Islamic History (ASH 3222) 3 credits
Women in Asian History (ASH 3384) 3 credits

(See History courses, this section)

Comparative Literature of Cultural China (CHT 4500) 3 credits
(See English courses, this section)

Storytelling (COM 4703) 3 credits
(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Religions and World Politics (CPO 3761) 3 credits
Comparative Politics: Middle East (CPO 4403) 3 credits
The Comparative Politics of Ethnic Conflict (CPO 4724) 3 credits

(See Political Science courses, this section)

Education in a Multicultural Society (EDF 3610) 3 credits
Teaching Diverse Populations (EDG 2701) 3 credits

(See Curriculum, Culture, and Educational Inquiry courses, College of Education section)

Slavery in the New World (HIS 4451) 3 credits
(See History courses, this section)

Italian-American Cinema (ITT 3522) 3 credits
(See Languages, Linguistics, Comparative Lit. courses, this section)

Classical Jewish Civilization (JST 3403) 3 credits
American-Jewish History, 1492-1990 (JST 4415) 3 credits
History of Hasidism (JST 4464) 3 credits
The Holocaust (JST 4701) 3 credits

(See Jewish Studies courses, this section)

History of the Caribbean (LAH 4470) 3 credits
(See History courses, this section)

Introduction to Latin American Studies (LAS 2000) 3 credits
African-American Vernacular English (LIN 4612) 3 credits

(See Languages, Linguistics, Comparative Lit. courses, this section)

Caribbean Literatures in English (LIT 4192) 3 credits
(See English courses, this section)

Minorities and the Media (MMC 3601) 3 credits
(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Music Cultures of the World (MUH 3514) 3 credits
Jazz in American Society (MUH 3801) 3 credits

(See Music courses, under School of the Arts at the end of this section)

Africana Philosophy (PHP 3781) 3 credits
(See Philosophy courses, this section)

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American Multicultural Discourse (SPC 3704) 3 credits
Intercultural Communication (SPC 3710) 3 credits
Gender, Race and Communication (SPC 4712) 3 credits
Ethnicity and Communication (SPC 4718) 3 credits

(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Race and Ethnic Relations (SYD 4700) 3 credits
Self and Society (SYP 4110) 3 credits
Social Change (SYP 4400) 3 credits

(See Sociology courses, this section)

Women of Color in U.S. Society (WST 4404) 3 credits
(See Women's Studies courses, this section)

Film and Video

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Anthropology of Film: An Introduction to Visual Anthropology (ANT 3391) 3 credits
(See Anthropology courses, this section)

Literature and Film (ENG 4114) 3 credits
(See English courses, this section)

Film Appreciation (FIL 2000) 3 credits
Film Theory (FIL 3803) 3 credits
Film to the 1940s (FIL 4036) 4 credits
Film since the 1940s (FIL 4037) 4 credits
Women and Film (FIL 4056) 3 credits
Radical Film, New Media and Social Movements (FIL 4058) 4 credits
Scriptwriting (FIL 4106) 4 credits
Documentary Film and Video (FIL 4364) 4 credits
Hollywood, Censorship and Regulation (FIL 4672) 3 credits
Studies in Asian Cinema (FIL 4843) 3-4 credits
Film Criticism (FIL 4851) 3 credits
Media Criticism (MMC 4501) 3 credits
Television Production (RTV 3228C) 4 credits
Experimental Video Production (RTV 3229) 4 credits
Video Production (RTV 3260) 4 credits
Documentary Video Production (RTV 3332C) 4 credits
U.S. Telecommunication Industry (RTV 4403) 3 credits
Television Studies (RTV 4400) 3 credits

(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Introduction to the Business of Motion Pictures (GEB 3052) 3 credits
(See Motion Pictures courses under Management, College of Business section)

Italian Cinema: From Text to Screen (ITT 3520) 3 credits
Italian-American Cinema (ITT 3522) 3 credits
Spanish Literature and Film (SPT 4720) 3 credits

(See Languages, Linguistics, Comparative Lit. courses, this section)

Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen 1 (TPP 4600) 3 credits
(See Theatre and Dance courses, under School of the Arts toward the end of this section)

Sex, Violence and Hollywood (WST 4337) 3 credits
(See Women's Studies courses, this section)

Film and Video Graduate Courses

Media and Popular Culture (CST 7304) 3 credits
(See Comparative Studies courses, this section)

Film Theory and Criticism (FIL 6807) 3 credits
Studies in Film and Television (FIL 6935) 3 credits
Mass Media Theory (MMC 6408) 3 credits

(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Television and Video Studies (RTV 6006) 3 credits
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)



Sex, Violence in Hollywood (WST 6339) 3 credits
(See Women’s Studies courses, this section)

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History

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

U.S. History to 1877 (AMH 2010) 3 credits
A study of the major themes, issues and patterns in the development of the United States to 1877. This is a General Education course. Grading: Pass/fail option

U.S. History since 1877 (AMH 2020) 3 credits
A study of the major themes, issues and patterns in the development of the United States since 1877. This is a General Education course. Grading: Pass/fail option

19th-Century America (AMH 3192) 3 credits
A study of 19th-century America focusing on the main themes from Republicanism to Populism and assessing the economic, political and social development of Americans.

20th-Century American Social History (AMH 3310) 3 credits
An investigation of major social and economic themes and movements in 20th-century America, emphasizing work, family life, gender issues, immigration and migration and race relations.

History of American Technology (AMH 3372) 3 credits
Introductory survey of American technological history. Chronological and topical in scope, including the Industrial Revolution, computer revolution and technology of the home.

The American South (AMH 3400) 3 credits
A survey of the region from the colonial period through the modern era emphasizing the interaction between the South as a distinct region and the South as an inescapable part of the United States. The focus of the course is on the economic, political and social changes that shaped Southern culture.

History of Florida (AMH 3420) 3 credits
A study of the history of the state from the time of the Spanish conquest to the present day.

History of American Immigration and Ethnicity (AMH 3530) 3 credits
An overview of the history of immigration to the United States and of the immigrant and ethnic experience in American society from colonial times to the present.

History of U.S. Women (AMH 3560) 3 credits
The changing roles of U.S. women from colonial days to the present. Topics include work patterns, family life, education, the abolitionist and suffrage movements and feminism.

African-American History to 1877 (AMH 3571) 3 credits
A survey of the African-American experience from West Africa through Reconstruction. Emphasis placed on African origins, the slave trade, colonial and antebellum slavery, origins of African-American culture, abolitionist movement, the Civil War and Reconstruction.

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African-American History since 1877 (AMH 3572) 3 credits
A survey of the African-American experience from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis placed on the goals of Reconstruction, segregation and Jim Crow, the development of Black organizations, Black Nationalism, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, and contemporary issues facing the African-American community.

American Environmental History (AMH 3630) 3 credits
History of the American Environment and the ways in which different cultural groups have perceived, used, managed, and conserved it, from colonial times to present.

The History of Colonial America (AMH 4110) 3 credits
European discovery and exploration, the settlement and development of the American colonies, rise of divergent interests, struggle between France and England for empire, causes and consequences of the Revolution.

Revolutionary Age (AMH 4133) 3 credits
A study of the period from 1763 to 1815 examining the origins and character of the American Revolution, the constitutional period and the Federalist Era, the Republican ascendancy, the significance of the Early Republic, and the impact and historiography of the Revolution. Some background in history is recommended.

The Age of Jefferson and Jackson (AMH 4150) 3 credits
A study of the early national period emphasizing the relationship between the economy and the political culture and how that relationship served to shape early 19th- century society and culture.

Civil War and Reconstruction (AMH 4170) 3 credits
A study of the American Civil War and Reconstruction period assessing the causes of the war, the military aspects and the reconstruction following the war.

The US in the Era of World War I and World War II (AMH 4231) 3 credits
Explores the history of the United States from 1900 to 1945. Surveys the transformation of American politics, economics, society and culture in this era of immense change. Charts the rise of the United States as a world power.

U.S. since 1945 (AMH 4270) 3 credits
An analysis of U.S. social, political, economic and diplomatic development since the end of the Second World War.

America in the 1960s (AMH 4273) 3 credits
This course examines the economic, political, social, and cultural transformation of America in the 1960s.

American Material Culture to 1860 (AMH 4302) 3 credits
A study of the physical aspects of American life: architecture, ceramics, clothing, art, etc., that provide insight into everyday life in early America.

American Material Culture from 1860 (AMH 4303) 3 credits
A study of the physical aspects of American life: lighting, domestic appliances, clothing, television, etc., that provide a unique insight into everyday life of America since 1860.

Social History of Early America (AMH 4307) 3 credits
Students read the words of historical actors as they sought to make sense of their lives and times in their autobiographies. The diverse themes explored in this course encompass slavery, transatlantic travel, religion, class, labor, and gender. The course begins with 16th-17th century Native American accounts and ends with Civil War memoirs by former slaves.

Class, Gender, and Race in the American Community since 1900 (AMH 4318) 3 credits
Development of class, gender and race for everyday behavior and for public policy.

American Politics since 1750 (AMH 4350) 3 credits
The origin and growth of national parties and the history of party struggles with emphasis upon presidential elections.

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Shopping, Travel, and Leisure in 20th-Century America (AMH 4377) 3 credits
Course covers the development of a republic of consumers by the U.S. government during the 20th century at the national level where political leaders enacted full employment and other growth policies. At the household level, ordinary residents then sought to improve their standard of living through shopping, travel, and leisure.

Urban History of the United State (AMH 4460) 3 credits
The rise of urban culture from the colonial village to the present-day metropolis.

Diplomatic History of the U.S. (AMH 4512) 3 credits
Emphasis on how America's development influences its world outlook.

History of African-American Women (AMH 4574) 3 credits
Traces the experiences, worldview and accounts of African-American women from slavery to freedom and examines black women’s lives and labor within the context of major historical themes and periods in American history, such as slavery, the American Civil War, Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Movement.

The Civil Rights Movement (AMH 4575) 3 credits
A survey of the African-American struggle for full citizenship and human rights. Students will study black leaders; their organizations; and the legal strategies, mainstream protest movements, and alternative (or radical) approaches they applied to solving the dilemmas of chronic discrimination and racism in 20th-century America.

American-Indian History (AMH 4580) 3 credits
An examination of selected aspects of American-Indian policy from the colonial era to the present. An ethnohistorical approach will be utilized in which Indian cultures are viewed as dynamic entities responding to changing conditions through contact with Euroamericans.

History of Southeastern Indians (AMH 4581) 3 credits
An ethnohistorical examination of Southeastern Indian tribes from pre-contact to the present time. Emphasis is placed on the political, economic and social impact on Indian communities resulting from interaction with Euroamericans.

American Sports History (AMH 4611) 3 credits
Examines the history of American sports, connecting the development of sports to larger themes in U.S. History. The class shows how sports are a microcosm of American society and reflects the positives and negatives of America's legacy.

Religion in America (AMH 4620) 3 credits
A history of American religious thought from the colonial period to the present. Major trends and controversies will be emphasized.

Special Topics in American History (AMH 4930) 3 credits
The study of a special area of American history. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Islamic History (ASH 3222) 3 credits
First of a two-part survey of the history of Islamic civilization in the Middle East. Course ranges from the rise of Islam to the height of Ottoman power in the 17th century. Focus is on methods of rule, cultural syncretism and Islamic thought.

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The Modern Middle East (ASH 3223) 3 credits
The second course in a two-part series, where the emphasis will be on the development of the modern Middle East, including Arab nationalism, Arab-Israeli conflict, Islamist movements, and Western involvement in the religion.

The Ottoman Empire (ASH 3233) 3 credits
Survey of the Ottoman Empire (~1302-1924). Areas to be addressed include: origins of Turks in region; rise of Ottoman and their expansion; Ottoman society and culture; methods of succession; relations with external powers (East and West); decline factors; dissolution of empire. Historiographical issues to be addressed throughout course.

History of East Asia (ASH 3300) 3 credits
An introduction to the culture and civilization of East Asia.

Women in Asian History (ASH 3384) 3 credits
This course examines the social, political, economic, and cultural roles played by women in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia. Selective topics will include religious beliefs, political systems, women's work, ideologies shaping popular notions about women, sexuality, the roles of women in the family, feminism, patriarchy, imperialism, revolution, and nationalism.

The Crusades (ASH 4210) 3 credits
Studies the Crusades from the perspective of the Muslim societies. Focus will be placed on the concepts surrounding the holy war, European sentiments, the events of the 11th- to 13th-century Crusades, Muslim society, and reaction at the time as well as the effects of the Crusades for Europe and the Islamic lands.

Modern Iran (ASH 4242) 3 credits
Course covers the history of Iran from the pre-modern Safavid period to the post-Khomeini period of the last 20th century. Although the survey nature of the course includes a chronological path, it moves beyond the political narrative to address cultural, social, and religious developments (Constitutional Revolution, 1970s revolution, post-Khomeini Iran).

History of Modern China (ASH 4404) 3 credits
A detailed study of the nature and development of modern Chinese History.

History of Modern Japan (ASH 4442) 3 credits
An introduction to modern Japan.

History of Modern India (ASH 4550) 3 credits
Consideration of the Indian Mutiny; British institutions in India; Nationalism; Hindu-Muslim communalism; partition; government and politics; economic and cultural development; and foreign policy since independence.

Indian Civilization (ASH 4560) 3 credits
An introduction to the civilization and culture of the Indian subcontinent from 2500 B.C. to the coming of the Europeans. Areas of concentration will include the Hindu state, society and religion.

History of Eastern Ideas (ASH 4600) 3 credits
Eastern thought from Confucianism-Buddhism to Communism.

History of Chinese Thought (ASH 4602) 3 credits
Introduces students to the history of Chinese thought. Covers the main three schools of thought in China, namely Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism. These three schools are critical for understanding East Asia both as a historical phenomenon and as a part of our modern world.

Zen and Buddhism (ASH 4603) 3 credits (ASH 4603) 3 credits
Course provides a thorough introduction to Buddhism, one of the major religions of the world. There are 400 billion Buddhists in the world today, mostly in Asia, but they do have a significant presence on every continent. The course covers the origin and development of Buddhism as well as the current state of the religion.

Islamic Intellectual History (ASH 4624) 3 credits
Course covers the development of Muslim thought from the Medieval to the Modern Period, touching on such topics as the tenets of faith, law, theology, philosophy, historiography, and Islamic mysticism. The final section of the course deals with developments and changes in Muslim thought during the
Modern Era.

Asia and the West (ASH 4630) 3 credits

Course focuses on the cultural, religious, political, demographic, economic, and other exchanges between Europe/North America and Asia (including Southwest, South, Southeast, and Far East) from the 16th century to the present. Primary emphasis is on examples of interaction from multiple perspectives to understand modes of interaction and historical patterns of globalization.

Introduction to Asian Studies (ASN 2005) 3 credits
Designed to provide an in-depth introduction to one area of Asia: East Asia, South Asia or West Asia. Because the Asian Studies Certificate is interdisciplinary, the course can be taught in any of the following Departments: Anthropology, English, History, Political Science, Sociology or Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature.

Special Topics in Asian History (ASH 4930) 3 credits
The study of a special area of Asian history. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

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European History Study Abroad (EUH 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

20th-Century Europe since World War II (EUH 3206) 3 credits
An investigation of some of the problems confronting Europeans from the pre-World War II period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the conflict of ideologies.

20th-Century Europe to World War II (EUH 3343) 3 credits
An investigation of the problems facing Europeans from the turn of the century to World War II. Emphasis will be placed on the conflict of ideologies.

History of Modern France (EUH 3451) 3 credits
French history and its impact since 1789. Economic trends, social and cultural movements and religious issues will complement a study of major political developments. Underlying themes and their impact across time are stressed.

History of Modern Germany (EUH 3462) 3 credits
A history of Germany. Emphasis will be placed on the period beginning with the close of the Napoleonic Wars to the present.

History of Modern Russia (EUH 3570) 3 credits
The Tartar origins, bureaucratic Russia from the reign of Alexander I to the Revolution of 1905, and the Soviet period.

Women in European History (EUH 3619) 3 credits
An examination of the social, political, and economic roles played by women in European history from the beginning of known civilizations to the present.

Medieval History (EUH 4120) 3 credits
The decline of the Roman Empire; the rise of Christianity; analysis of feudalism and manorialism; the economic revival; and the origins of Western Society.

Renaissance Europe (1350–1500) (EUH 4140) 3 credits
History of Europe between 1350 and 1500, including effects of the Black Death, growth of national monarchies, technological innovations, overseas expansion, Italian and northern humanist culture, popular culture, and gender roles.

Reformation Europe (1500–1650) (EUH 4144) 3 credits
History of Europe between 1500 and 1650, including background and outbreak of Protestantism, Counter-reformation, religious wars, gender roles, witch hunts, economic and colonial expansion, political consolidations, and Baroque and popular cultures.

Early Modern Europe (EUH 4200) 3 credits
History of Europe between 1648 and 1789, including creation of modern states system, rise and fall of absolutism in France, scientific and Enlightenment culture, constitutional conflict in England, and imperial rivalries and wars, focusing on the various perspectives of class and gender.

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19th-Century Europe (EUH 4233) 3 credits
History of Europe from the French Revolution to World War I. Themes will include the rise of liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, and socialism, the social and economic impact of the industrial revolution, the "new" imperialism, and developments in the arts and sciences.

Rise and Fall of the Cold War (EUH 4282) 3 credits
Examination of Cold War origins, impact of the superpower conflict on European politics and diplomacy, and the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union.

History of Greek Civilization (EUH 4403) 3 credits
From the 8th century B.C. to 400 A.D.

History of Roman Civilization (EUH 4411) 3 credits
From the 8th century B.C. to 500 A.D.

Hitler and Nazi Germany (EUH 4465) 3 credits
Hitler's rise to power. Politics and policies of the Nazi era.

Medieval England (EUH 4500) 3 credits
Consideration of the political, constitutional and institutional development of England from the 5th century to 1485.

Modern Britain (EUH 4502) 3 credits
Industrialization: the English historical model; critiques of society; political reform; the emergence of the welfare state; empire and commonwealth; the British and the origins of the two World Wars.

Tudor-Stuart England (EUH 4511) 3 credits
England from 1485 to 1714 including constitutional development, popular and elite culture, religious change, civil wars, revolution, economic crisis, commercial expansion, and international relations.

British Empire (EUH 4530) 3 credits
Great Britain's empire from acquisition to dissolution. Topics include motives for acquisition, theories of imperialism, transfer of ideas and institutions, histories of Australia, New Zealand, India, Canada and British Africa.

Modern Ireland (EUH 4538) 3 credits
Provides students with a comprehensive survey of modern Irish history since 1692 with a focus on the period 1801-1923 and an emphasis on political and social developments. Topics include the Act of Union, the Great Famine, the Irish Diaspora and the Irish Revolution.

History of European Sexuality (EUH 4684) 3 credits
Introduces students to the latest scholarship on the role of sexual desire in the cultural development of Europe and how associated ideas also impacted politics, society, economics and religion.

Special Topics in European History (EUH 4930) 3 credits
The study of a special area of European history. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

European History Study Abroad (EUH 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

University Honors Seminar in History (HIS 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in history.

Writing History (HIS 2050) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or better
Introduces students to the discipline of History by working with them on developing their skills in critical thinking, reading and writing. The focus is on historical inquiry and the production of clear, effective written prose. As such, it acts as an official substitute for ENC 1102. This is a General Education course.

Topics in Historical Investigation (HIS 2934) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
In-depth study of a particular historical problem, period, or event through lectures, discussions of readings, and writing assignments. Topics will vary. This is a General Education course.

History Study Abroad (HIS 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Historical Methods (HIS 3150) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: Open to declared History majors only or with permission of instructor
Historical methods and the history of historical writing. Required of history majors before completing 90 credits.

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History of Christianity to 1500 (HIS 3432) 3 credits
History of the Christian church from origins in the Roman Empire to the dawn of the Reformation, with emphasis on heresy, persecution, doctrinal development, missionary movements, popular piety, and sectarianism.

History of Christianity since 1500 (HIS 3434) 3 credits
History of the Christian church from the Reformation to the present, with emphasis on Protestant and Catholic reform movements, religious strife and persecution, confessionalism, worldwide growth, secularization, theological developments, and responses to modernity.

Introduction to Public History (HIS 4065) 3 credits
Explores fields of endeavor outside of teaching. Includes museum work, preservation activities, public and private.

The Birth of Aviation and Its Impact on the 20th Century (HIS 4322) 3 credits

Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or substitute

The primary goal of this course is to learn about aviation history and its impact on the United States and the world. The course develops students' fundamental skills in critical and global thinking and in comparative analysis. It also develops their understanding of the interaction of race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, and technology.

History of Western Ideas HIS 4345) 3 credits
Basic themes in Western philosophical, literary, scientific and artistic history since the 18th century are studied, together with their cultural background. The impact of ideas on each other and on human progress in the last two centuries is emphasized.

Religion in the Atlantic World (HIS 4435) 3 credits
Course covers the history of the major world religions' impact on the Atlantic World from the 15th century to the 19th century. Students study how the major world religions were introduced to the New World and the impact this introduction had both on the indigenous inhabitants and the Old World colonizers.

Slavery in the New World: A Comparative Perspective (HIS 4451) 3 credits
This course focuses on the economic, political, and cultural dimensions of African slavery in the Americas. Primary emphasis will be on Brazil, the United States, and Cuba from the Age of Revolution through the period of emancipation.

Directed Independent Study (HIS 4906) 2-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading and research in a field of history, with program of study selected and reviewed in consultation with Department faculty members. Permission of instructor required.

Special Topics (HIS 4930) 1-3 credits
The study of a special area in history. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Senior Seminar (HIS 4935) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: HIS 3150

A seminar for advanced undergraduate history majors, exploring varied topics through reading, research, writing, and discussion. Required of History majors.

Internship in Public History (HIS 4944) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 4065 or permission of instructor
Practicum in public history involving service at local museums, historical societies, and preservation agencies.

History Study Abroad (HIS 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Senior Thesis in History (HIS 4970) 3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 3150 and permission of instructor
Completion of a substantial thesis under faculty supervision.

Colonial Latin American History (LAH 3100) 3 credits
Traces the development of society in Latin America from pre-Columbian and Iberian experiences until the Wars of Independence, and covers political, social, and economic topics.

Latin American Independence (LAH 3133) 3 credits
The history of Latin America from 1750 until 1850, including the causes of the independence movements, the wars for independence, and the ensuing political conflicts.

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Modern Latin American History (LAH 3200) 3 credits
Studies the Latin American republics from the wars of independence to the present. Major problems facing the region are studied in their historical context.

Women in Latin American History (LAH 3721) 3 credits
This course examines the changing roles and images of women in Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to the present.

Indians in Latin American History (LAH 4131) 3 credits

Explores the complex processes by which Europeans came to dominate the indigenous peoples in the New World with emphasis on Latin America. Course also analyzes how Indians and Africans shaped the formation of New World religions and cultural traditions since 1492.

History of Mexico (LAH 4430) 3 credits
The study of Mexican history from earliest times to the present. Focuses on the political, economic, and social history of the country.

History of the Caribbean (LAH 4470) 3 credits
The study of the historical development of the Caribbean-Gulf of Mexico cultural area from earliest times to the present. Emphasis is on Hispanic legacy and the region's strategic importance since the 18th century.

History of Cuba (LAH 4480) 3 credits
Studies in the development of the Cuban nation from Pre-Columbian times to the present.

Special Topics in Latin American History (LAH 4930) 3 credits
The study of a special area in Latin American history. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Introduction to Peace Studies (PAX 3001) 3 credits

Provides an overview and in-depth analysis, from varying perspectives, of the conceptual and theoretical framework of modern peace.

The Religious Experience (REL 3020) 3 credits
An introduction to the academic study of religion. Students explore the nature of religion and the diversity that exists among and within different religious traditions.

History of Civilization 1 (WOH 2012) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with grade of "C" or better

A survey of civilization from earliest times to the early 18th century. This is a General Education course.

History of Civilization 2 (WOH 2022) 3 credits
A survey of civilization from early 18th century to the present. This is a General Education course.

World War II (WOH 4244) 3 credits
An examination of the background and waging of World War Two. Aspects explored will include the military, diplomatic, social, and economic dimensions.

Revolution and Resistance in the Atlantic World (WOH 4272) 3 credits
This course examines social revolutions, peasant rebellions, and other strategies of resistance used by the poor in Latin America and Europe. Readings include social and political theory as well as historical readings on the French, Haitian, Mexican, Russian, and Cuban revolutions. It is structured as a seminar, requiring that students engage in active discussion and a significant amount of writing. Some background in history is recommended.

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History Graduate Courses

Readings in Florida History (AMH 5902) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Readings on selected topics in the field of Florida history. May be repeated for credit.

Readings in American History (AMH 5905) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Readings on selected topics and problems in United States history. May be repeated for credit.

Seminar in Florida History (AMH 6935) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Group discussion and individual research on selected topics. May be repeated for credit.

Seminar in United States History (AMH 6939) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Group discussion and individual research on selected topics. May be repeated for credit.

Readings in European History (EUH 5905) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Readings on selected topics in a field or fields of European history. May be repeated for credit.

Seminar in European History (EUH 6939) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor

Group discussion and individual research on selected topics. May be repeated for credit.

The Historical Experience (HIS 5060) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
A seminar designed to introduce the beginning graduate student to the technical aspects of the study of history; it treats the problems involved in the preparation of the master's thesis.

Readings in Public History (HIS 5903) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Readings on selected topics in the field of public history. May be repeated for credit.

Readings in Comparative History (HIS 5904) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Readings in selected topics in comparative history. May be repeated for credit.

Directed Independent Study (HIS 5909) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings and research in a field of history.

Internship in Public History (HIS 5942) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Practicum in public history involving service at local museums, historical societies, and preservation agencies. May be repeated for credit.

Teaching Practicum (HIS 5944) 3 credits
Required of all History graduate assistants. This course is designed to help graduate assistants develop their skills as discussion leaders in introductory courses in which a faculty member has responsibility for course organization and lectures.

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Directed Independent Study (HIS 6908) 1-3 credits
Reading and research in a field of history, with a program of study selected and reviewed in consultation with the Department faculty members. Permission of instructor is required.

Special Topics (HIS 6934) 1-3 credits
Study of a special area in history. Topics will vary. The course may be repeated for credit.

Seminar in Comparative History (HIS 6939) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Group discussion and individual research on selected topics. May be repeated for credit.

Master's Thesis (HIS 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Readings in Latin American History (LAH 5902) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Readings on selected topics in a field or fields of Latin American history. May be repeated for credit.

Seminar in Latin American History (LAH 6938) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Group discussion and individual research on selected topics. May be repeated for credit.

Readings in World History (WOH 5935) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Readings on selected topics in a field or fields of non-Western history. May be repeated for credit.

Seminar in World History (WOH 6937) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate history program or permission of instructor
Selected topics and problems. May be repeated for credit.

Honors


Undergraduate Courses

Honors Credit (IDH 4905) 1 credit
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and admission to the designated Honors Program
Honors Credit for students enrolled in the Honors Program. May be taken for repeated credit.

Honors Reading Seminar (IDH 4931) 1-3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program

Readings, discussions, projects, and field trips, culminating in an honors portfolio directed by Honors faculty.

Honors Thesis (IDH 4970) 1-3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and admission to the designated Honors Program
Thesis hours for students enrolled in the Honors Program.

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Humanities


Undergraduate Courses

Cooperative Education - Humanities (HUM 3949) 1-4 credits
Course may be taken up to four times for a maximum of 8 credits.

Interdisciplinary Studies:

Arts and Humanities and Social Science

Many courses for these majors are listed previously in this section; these courses draw from several departments in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters. Other interdisciplinary courses are listed below.

Undergraduate Courses

Temporary Study Abroad (IDS 2957) 1-15 credits

Perspectives in Print Media (IDS 4660) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ENC 1101; permission of instructor
Interdisciplinary study of writing in print media from the perspective of such areas as history, the environment, urban affairs, the arts, psychology, and social issues. Emphasis on critical analysis, research, and writing with lecturers on writing techniques.

Directed Independent Study (IDS 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This is an open-enrollment independent study to be used to cover subject matter suitable for independent study but not currently offered by the various colleges.

Directed Independent Study (IDS 4907) 1-4 credits

Liberal Studies Colloquium (IDS 4920) 1-3 credits
A colloquium discussing knowledge and methods in the Arts and Sciences with frequent guest lectures by colleagues from the various disciplines within the University and culminating in the essay or project on a Liberal Arts theme.

Special Topics (IDS 4930) 1-3 credits
This is an open-enrollment special topics course used to cover special subject matters not presently offered by the various colleges.

General Study Abroad (IDS 4957) 1-15 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

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Jewish Studies


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

History of American Immigration and Ethnicity (AMH 3530) 3 credits
Religion in America (AMH 4620) 3 credits

(See History courses, this section)

Jewish-American Literature (AML 4663) 3 credits
(See English courses, this section)

Religions and World Politics (CPO 3761) 3 credits
(See Political Science courses, this section)

Hitler and Nazi Germany (EUH 4465) 3 credits
(See History courses, this section)

Beginning Hebrew Language and Culture 1 (HBR 1120) 4 credits
Beginning Hebrew Language and Culture 2 (HBR 1121) 4 credits
Intermediate Hebrew Language and Culture 1 (HBR 2220) 4 credits
Intermediate Hebrew Language and Culture 2 (HBR 2221) 4 credits

Readings in Intermediate Hebrew (HBR 2240) 4 credits
Directed Independent Study (HBR 4905) 1-4 credits
Special Topics (HBR 4930) 1-4 credits

(See Languages, Linguistics, Comparative Lit. courses, this section)

Jewish Literature Through the Centuries (JST 3102) 3 credits
Surveys Jewish literature from the Bible to recent times, providing a sense of its range and richness in different centuries and cultures. Course reviews literary technique in prose and poetry as well as analyzes how texts express religious, cultural, and political meaning.

Classical Jewish Civilization (JST 3403) 3 credits

A survey of Judaic studies from Biblical times to the beginning of Jewish Emancipation in the late 1700s. Topics include Jewish holy texts, Jewish history in Temple times, Judaism and the foundations of Christianity and Islam; Medieval Jewish history, the changing role of women in Jewish culture, Hasidism, and the Jews of Eastern Europe.

Modern Jewish Civilization (JST 3404) 3 credits
A survey of Jewish history, religion, and culture from the beginning of Jewish Emancipation in the late 1700s to issues of the 21st century. Topics include the development of denominationalism, modern Antisemitism, Zionism and the state of Israel, the Holocaust, American Jewish life, and the rebirth of Jewish mysticism.

Jewish Wisdom: An Introduction to Classical Jewish Thought (JST 3513) 3 credits
An introduction to traditional Jewish thought and civilization through the medium of Rabbinic texts. Areas of inquiry will include Jewish metaphysics, theology, ethics, mysticism, and gender politics.

The Dead Sea Scrolls (JST 4144) 3 credits
Offers a close reading of the content of the scrolls found in the Judean desert and highlights their relevance for the period in which they were written as well as their implications for the Bible and the histories of Judaism and Christianity.

American-Jewish History, 1492-1990 (JST 4415) 3 credits
A survey of major issues and themes in American-Jewish history set within the context of North America, from the first Jewish settlers to the National Jewish Population survey of 1990.

The Jews of Spain and the Middle East (JST 4417) 3 credits
The geography, history, culture, languages, literature, and emigration patterns of the Jews who originated in medieval Spain and spread throughout the Mediterranean Basin, including Greece, Turkey, and the Balkan peninsula, living under the religious and legal influences of Islam.

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Ancient Israel (JST 4424) 3 credits
The history of ancient Israel during the Old Testament period, including its culture and religion, in the light of archaeological discoveries.

History of Zionism and the State of Israel, 1880-1990 (JST 4425) 3 credits
An in-depth examination of the modern State of Israel and its development from the birth of modern Zionism to the end of the 20th century.

Medieval Jewish History (JST 4430) 3 credits
The history of Jews under Muslim and Christian rule from 600 C.E. to 1700. Course covers how wider historical events shaped Jewish history and how Jewish thought and daily life varied with time and place.

Women and Judaism (JST 4510) 3 credits
The first part of this course surveys the history of women in Judaism from Biblical times, considering social and religious factors. The second part covers women in Judaism in the 20th and 21st centuries, including both feminist theory and the different perspectives of many individual women.

The Holocaust (JST 4701) 3 credits
An in-depth study of the Holocaust from its political, religious, and ideological roots in Antisemitism through the Nazi Final Solution to post-Holocaust issues of ethics, theology, and moral choice.

Directed Independent Study (JST 4905) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Directed independent study on approved topics in Holocaust and Judaic studies.

Special Topics (JST 4930) 3 credits

Jewish Studies Senior Seminar (JST 4935) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Senior standing
This seminar is devoted to scholarly study of aspects of Jewish civilization.

Old Testament (REL 3213) 3 credits
An introduction to the contents of the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) and the methods modern scholars use to understand it.

Image of Woman in the Bible (REL 4218) 3 credits
The role and treatment of femininity in the Bible, with particular emphasis on the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) including a variety of contemporary approaches and concerns.

Jewish Studies Graduate Courses

Readings in American History (AMH 5905) 3 credits
(See History courses, this section)

Spirituality (CST 7308) 3 credits
(See Comparative Studies courses, this section)

Readings in European History (EUH 5905) 3 credits
(See History courses, this section)

Seminar: Special Topics (LIT 6934) 3 credits
Seminar: Literature and Other Fields (LIT 6936) 3 credits

(See English courses, this section)

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Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature

Students should direct questions concerning the University Foreign Language requirement and placement in language courses to the Chair of the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature. The Department enforces a non-audit policy in its language courses.

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

+ = Grading: Pass/fail option

Beginning Arabic Language and Culture 1 (ARA 1120) 4 credits
Beginning study of Modern Standard Arabic language and Arabic culture. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Beginning Arabic Language and Culture 2 (ARA 1121) 4 credits

Prerequisite: ARA 1120 or permission of instructor
Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Practice in reading and writing. For students with some experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture 1 (ARA 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARA 1121 or permission of instructor
Emphasis on communication skills and grammar. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.


Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture 2 (ARA 2221) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARA 2220 or permission of instructor
Continuation of emphasis on communication skills with special attention to grammar review. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.


Beginning Chinese Language and Culture 1 (CHI 1120) 4 credits
Beginning study of Chinese language and culture. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Beginning Chinese Language and Culture 2 (CHI 1121) 4 credits
Prerequisite: CHI 1120 or permission of instructor
Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Practice in reading and writing. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.


Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture 1 (CHI 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: CHI 1121 or permission of instructor
Emphasis on communication skills and grammar. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.


Classical Greek Literature (CLT 2101) 3 credits

Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Classical Greek epic, drama, and poetry, their types and characteristics, the cultural contexts of the writers and audiences, and the crucial position these works occupy.

Classical Roman Literature (CLT 2120) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
An introduction to Classical Roman literature, major texts and historical contexts.

Classical Mythology (CLT 3370) 3 credits
Course examines major myths from Greek and Roman antiquity through primary sources (all in translation) and discusses their interpretations from various modern perspectives. Course also investigates the reception of myth in contemporary popular culture, especially cinema and television.

Introduction to European Studies (EUS 2001) 3 credits
Introduces students of all backgrounds to the concept of Europe and the field of European Studies from a humanities perspective. Designed so students broaden their knowledge of the world and understand the key ideas, issues, artistic and literary currents that contributed to today’s concept of Europe.

Europe: Language, Culture, and Identity (EUS 3004) 3 credits
Introduction to the field of European studies focusing on issues of language, culture, and identity.

Beginning Foreign Language and Culture 1 (FOL 1120) 4 credits
Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Russian, Yiddish and others to be offered according to the needs of students and availability of instructors.

+Beginning Foreign Language and Culture 2 (FOL 1121) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FOL 1120 or equivalent
Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Russian, Yiddish and others to be offered according to the needs of students and availability of instructors.

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+Intermediate Foreign Language (FOL 2203) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FOL 1121 or equivalent
Classical and contemporary foreign languages to be offered according to the needs of students and availability of instructors. Continuation of emphasis on communication skills in a cultural context with special attention to grammar review. Not open to native speakers.

+Foreign Language Study Abroad (FOL 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Research and Bibliographic Methods (FOL 3880) 3 credits
Teaches how to find and evaluate print, electronic and online scholarly sources and how to outline, write, edit, critique, revise and evaluate a research paper in literary studies or linguistics. Required of all undergraduate majors in the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature, preferably during the student's first semester of study.

Special Topics (FOL 4933) 3 credits
Intensive study of variable special topics in the culture, civilization and language of Russia, Israel, Sweden and other countries. To be offered according to the needs of students and availability of instructors.

Senior Honors Seminar in Languages and Linguistics (FOL 4935) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Senior standing in honors program
A small seminar for students admitted to Honors in Languages and Linguistics, within 30 credits of graduation. Intensive study of theoretical issues and practical problems in critical reading and writing. Preparation of research papers.

Foreign Language Study Abroad (FOL 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Senior Honors Thesis (FOL 4970) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FOL 4935
Closely supervised research and writing of the Senior Honors Thesis.

Beginning French Language and Culture 1 (FRE 1120) 4 credits
Beginning study of French language and culture. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Beginning French Language and Culture 2 (FRE 1121) 4 credits
Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Practice in reading and writing. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Intensive Beginning French (FRE 1150) 8 credits
This course combines FRE 1120 and 1121 in an intensive, one-semester unit. Emphasis is placed on speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing. For students with little or no background in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Intermediate French Language and Culture 1 (FRE 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 1121 or FRE 1150 or equivalent
Students continue to develop basic communicative skills in French and use those skills to expand their knowledge of the cultures of the French-speaking peoples of the world. Not open to native speakers or equivalent.

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+ = Grading: Pass/fail option

Intermediate French Language and Culture 2 (FRE 2221) 4 credits

Prerequisite: FRE 2220 or equivalent
Continuation of emphasis on communication skills, with special attention to grammar review. Not open to native speakers or equivalent.

Intermediate French Conversation (FRE 2240) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 1121 or equivalent
Course is designed to develop students' ability to communicate more fluently in French and discuss a wide variety of cultural topics relating to France and the broader Francophone world.

+French Language and Culture Study Abroad (FRE 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Francais de Perfectionnement: French for Bilinguals (FRE 3340) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Designed for native speakers of French whose knowledge of formal written French is lacking. Development of reading and writing skills, with special focus on the formal standard language for general and professional use.

Culture et Societe: Cinema (FRE 3393) 3 credits

Prerequisite: FRE 2221 or permission of instructor
Course provides intensive practice in spoken and written French through an examination of selected cultural topics in contemporary French and francophone culture as highlighted in recent French-language films.

Advanced French Language and Culture 1 (FRE 3400) 4 credits
Composition and conversation based on selected texts. Review of grammar. Not open to native speakers.

Advanced French Language and Culture 2 (FRE 3401) 4 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 2221 or permission of instructor
Composition and conversation based on selected texts. Review of grammar. FRE 3401 may be taken before 3400. FRE 3400 is not open to native speakers (who should substitute FRE 3340).

Commercial French (FRE 3440) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 2221 or permission of instructor
Fundamentals of commercial and administrative French usage and correspondence. Introduction to relevant aspects of French commerce.

Advanced Commercial French (FRE 3442) 3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
A continuation of FRE 3440; advanced study of business French and preparation for the Chambre de Commerce et d' Industrie de Paris exam, leading to certificate in Commercial French.

Prononciation et Phonetique (FRE 3780) 3 credits
Targeted pronunciation practice using the phonetic alphabet with the objective of improving production of standard French pronunciation. Provides students with the tools to systematically improve French pronunciation and understand spoken French in various contexts.

French Culture Study Abroad (FRE 3952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Structure of Modern French (FRE 4850) 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
Modern French from the point of view of descriptive linguistics. Structural analysis of the phonology, semantics, morphology, and syntax, with theoretical and practical applications.

Special Topics in French Language Studies (FRE 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 3400 or equivalent
Intensive study of aspects of the French language. Since content will vary, course may repeated for credit.

French Language and Culture Study Abroad (FRE 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

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Literature in Translation: The French Tradition (FRT 3140) 3 credits
Reading and discussion in English of selected works from the full range of French literature, including major and minor traditions, genres and individual authors. Course content will vary from such genres as the novel and movements as Realism, to single authors such as Proust.

French Culture Study Abroad (in Translation) (FRT 3956) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Introduction to the Study of French-Language Literature (FRW 3001) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 3400 or permission of instructor
Introduction to a variety of approaches to understanding and analyzing French-Language literature: the major genre distinction, multiple types, analysis of prose, poetry, plays.

French Civilization and Literature: Middle Ages and Renaissance (FRW 3100) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 3400 or equivalent
Study of major literary, intellectual and cultural developments beginning in the Middle Ages and including Latin traditions, the sermon, the verse epic, the troubadours, Arthurian cycles, Renaissance poetics, essay, and fiction. Reading and discussion of representative texts.

French Civilization and Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries (FRW 3101) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 3400 or equivalent
Study of major literary, intellectual, and cultural developments including Neoclassicism, Jansenism, comedy, satire, Enlightenment, and political essay. Reading and discussion of representative texts.

French Civilization and Literature: Middle Ages to Revolution (FRW 3102) 3 credits
Study of major literary, intellectual and cultural developments from the Middle Ages through 1789, including verse epic, the troubadours, Arthurian cycles, Renaissance poetics, Humanism, Neoclassicism, Jansenism, comedy, satire, Enlightenment, epistolary novel, Conte philosophique and political essay. Reading and discussion of representative texts.

French Civilization and Literature: 19th and 20th Centuries (FRW 3122) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 3400 or equivalent
Study of major literary, intellectual, and cultural developments beginning in 1789 including Realism, Naturalism, Entre-Deux-Guerres, Existentialism, and the Theater of the Absurd. Reading and discussion of representative texts.

Women in the Medieval French Tradition (FRW 4413) 3 credits
Prerequisites: FRW 3001 and 3100; Corequisite: FOL 3880
In-depth study of literary representations of women in the medieval French tradition from 1100 to 1400. Discussion focuses on medieval texts from widely varying textual traditions, such as the theological, courtly, lyric, and didactic. Primary texts accompanied by secondary readings contextualizing various historical, cultural, and social issues of the period.

Courtly Love Tradition (FRW 4414) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRW 3001; Corequisites: FRW 3100 and/or FOL 3880
Study of the courtly love tradition from its origin in 11th-century Occitan lyric to its later reception in verse romance. To understand the profound influence of courtly love as literary paradigm, students also study social, political, and theological factors affecting its development. Course includes reading and discussion of representative texts.

Postcolonial France or France Through Their Eyes (FRW 4554) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FRE 3400 with minimum grade of "C" or permission of instructor
Explores the status and experience of immigrants (and their descendants) as perceived by these immigrants. Focuses on works by writers and filmmakers whose families are originally from the Maghreb. Pays attention to discursive and aesthetic strategies as means of subversion, criticism and resistance.

Directed Independent Study (FRW 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading and research in advanced subjects in French. For third- and fourth-year students in good standing only, with program of study prearranged in consultation with instructor.

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+ = Grading: Pass/fail option

Special Topics in French Literature (FRW 4930) 1-3 credits

Intensive study of authors, genres or literary movements. Since content will vary, course may be repeated for credit.

Senior Seminar (FRW 4933) 3 credits
Prerequisites: FOL 3880 and two 3000-level LIT courses
This seminar for advanced French major focuses on French cultural history as refracted through one cultural object, such as the medieval cathedral or the Eiffel Tower. Alterations to the object itself, and variations in literary/artistic trends in representing the object, are highlighted as indicative of shifting cultural paradigms. Since subject of study will vary, course may be repeated for credit.

French Literature Study Abroad (FRW 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Honors Thesis in French (FRW 4972) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Intense reading and writing leading to completion of an honors thesis on a topic related to a theoretical or critical aspect of French and/or Francophone literature and/or culture.

Beginning German Language and Culture 1 (GER 1120) 4 credits
For students with no previous knowledge of German. First part of an introductory German course emphasizing communicative competence in German, while increasing an understanding of contemporary German culture.

Beginning German Language and Culture 2 (GER 1121) 4 credits
Second part of an introductory German course emphasizing communicative competence in German, while increasing an understanding of contemporary German culture.

Intensive Beginning German (GER 1150) 8 credits
This course combines GER 1120 and 1121 in an intensive, one-semester unit. Emphasis is placed on speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing. For students with little or no background in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Intermediate German (GER 2201) 4 credits

Prerequisite: GER 1121 or permission of instructor
Intended to help students develop their German skills and express themselves more idiomatically and accurately in speaking as well as in writing. Emphasizes the ethnic and cultural complexities of contemporary society in the German-speaking world.

Intermediate German: Culture and Society (GER 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GER 1121 or equivalent
Emphasizes the ethnic and cultural complexity of contemporary German society through a wide range of authentic texts. Accompanied by an intermediate grammar, this course is intended to help students learn to speak, read, and write German with more confidence.

+German Language and Culture Study Abroad (GER 2952) 1-8 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for approved study abroad programs.

Advanced German: Reading and Composition (GER 3400) 4 credits
Practice of reading and composition based on literary and culturally relevant authentic texts. Review of grammar.

Business German (GER 3440) 3 credits
Prerequisite: One semester of intermediate German or permission of instructor
Students learn to communicate in German in the world of business. Emphasis on current affairs in German economy and politics.

Advanced German: Culture and Society (GER 3503) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Two semesters of intermediate German
Emphasizes the complexity of contemporary German society through a wide range of authentic texts. The course is intended to help students perfect their spoken and written German, while developing a deeper understanding of German culture and society.

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German Culture Study Abroad (GER 3952) 1-8 credits
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Credit for approved study abroad programs.

Structure of Modern German (GER 4850) 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
Modern German from the point of view of descriptive linguistics, with emphasis on current issues and approaches.

Special Topics in German Language Studies (GER 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: GER 3400 or equivalent
Intensive study of special topics in German language studies. Course may be repeated for credit.

German Language and Culture Study Abroad (GER 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for approved study abroad programs.

German Literature in Translation (GET 3130) 3 credits
Reading and discussion of German literature in English translation. Course content will vary. Course may be repeated for credit.

Kafka, etc. (GET 3600) 3 credits
Introduction to German modernism with special focus on selected works by Franz Kafka. Taught in English.

Thomas Mann (GET 3610) 3 credits

Focuses on selected major novels, stories and essays by Thomas Mann in translation. Taught in English.

German Culture Study Abroad (in Translation) (GET 3956) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

+Readings in Intermediate German (GEW 2104) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GER 1121 or equivalent
Focuses on classic readings in intermediate German. Accompanied by an intermediate grammar, the course is intended to help students read and discuss literary texts, and express themselves more idiomatically and accurately in speaking as well as in writing.

Modern German Literature (GEW 3730) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Two semesters of intermediate German
Introduction to German literature and the basic concepts and techniques of literary analysis. Students learn to analyze contemporary German literature and write about literary texts in German. Readings vary.

Seminar in German Literature (GEW 3934) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Two semesters of intermediate German
Students explore special topics in German literature by concentrating on a particular author, theme, genre, or period. Course may be repeated for credit.

Directed Independent Study (GEW 4905) 1-3 credits
Independent study in German literature in consultation with the instructor.

Special Topics in German Literature (GEW 4930) 1-3 credits
Advanced seminar on topics in German literature, concentrating on a particular author, theme, genre, or period. Course may be repeated for credit.

German Literature Study Abroad (GEW 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for approved study abroad programs.

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+ = Grading: Pass/fail option

Beginning Classical Greek Language and Culture 1 (GRE 1120) 4 credits

Beginning study of classical Greek. For students with little or no background in the study of the ancient Greek language.

+Beginning Classical Greek Language and Culture 2 (GRE 1121) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GRE 1120 or equivalent
Study of grammar and reading of classical Greek, primarily within the context of the ancient Greek civilization and culture. Acquisition of translation, reading, and writing skills. For students with little or no background in the study of the ancient Greek language.

Beginning Modern Greek Language and Culture 1 (GRK 1120) 4 credits
The course teaches students how to communicate in Modern Greek, the language spoken in both Hellas and Cyprus, by placing equal emphasis on speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Students are also exposed to a variety of ideas pertaining Hellenic culture and society.

Beginning Modern Greek Language and Culture 2 (GRK 1121) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GRK 1120
This course builds upon the knowledge of Modern Greek students acquire by taking GRK 1120. The course covers basic vocabulary and grammar by engaging students in virtual daily situations and by equally emphasizing speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

(The following four Hebrew courses are crosslisted with the Department of Jewish Studies.)

Beginning Hebrew Language and Culture 1 (HBR 1120) 4 credits
Beginning study of Hebrew language and culture. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Beginning Hebrew Language and Culture 2 (HBR 1121) 4 credits
Prerequisite: HBR 1120 or equivalent
Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Practice in reading and writing. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Intermediate Hebrew Language and Culture 1 (HBR 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: HBR 1121 or equivalent
Emphasis on communication skills and grammar. Not open to native speakers or equivalent.

+Intermediate Hebrew Language and Culture 2 (HBR 2221) 4 credits
Prerequisite: HBR 2220 or equivalent
Continuation of emphasis on communication skills, with special attention to grammar review. Not open to native speakers or equivalent.

Readings in Intermediate Hebrew (HBR 2240) 4 credits
Prerequisites: HBR 1121 or equivalent
Course focuses on classic readings in intermediate Hebrew, helping students to read texts with particular emphasis on the Bible.

Directed Independent Study (HBR 4905) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: Junior or senior level with program of study prearranged in consultation with instructor
Reading and research in advanced subjects in Hebrew.

Special Topics (HBR 4930) 1-4 credits
Intensive study of authors, genres, or literary movements. Content will vary; course may be repeated for credit.

Beginning Italian Language and Culture 1 (ITA 1120) 4 credits
Beginning study of Italian language and culture. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

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Beginning Italian Language and Culture 2 (ITA 1121) 4 credits
Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Practice in reading and writing. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Intensive Beginning Italian (ITA 1150) 8 credits
This course combines ITA 1120 and 1121 in an intensive, one-semester unit. Emphasis is placed on speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing. For students with little or no background in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

Intermediate Italian Language and Culture 1 (ITA 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ITA 1121 or ITA 1150 or equivalent
Emphasis on communication skills and grammar. Not open to native speakers or equivalent.

Intermediate Italian Language and Culture 2 (ITA 2221) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2220 or equivalent
Continuation of emphasis on communication skills, with a special attention to grammar review. Not open to native speakers or equivalent.

Italian Language and Culture Study Abroad (ITA 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Italian Writing Workshop (ITA 3300) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2220 with minimum grade of "C"
Learn to write Italian correctly and effectively. Written exercises and class discussions help students face several writing problems and train in the difficult art of writing. The objective is not only to write correctly but also to learn how to modulate the style of expression depending on the purpose of writing.

Reading the Italian Press (ITA 3412) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2220 with minimum grade of "C"
A conversation-based intermediate-advanced Italian course. Uses original Italian material to spark a conversation that requires active participation. Taught in Italian and aims to develop vocabulary and Italian grammatical structures in both speaking and writing.

Advanced Italian 1 (ITA 3420) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2221 or equivalent
This course further expands grammar and syntax through the reading and detailed analysis of a variety of texts targeting different registers of language. The texts are chosen in function of their Italian cultural or generally cross-cultural content, their relevance for practical use, and their ability to stimulate discussion. Ample opportunity to practice the Italian language both orally and in writing will be provided. Not open to native speakers.

Advanced Italian 2 (ITA 3421) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2221 or equivalent
Composition and conversation based on selected texts. Review of grammar. ITA 3421 may be taken before ITA 3420. Not open to native speakers.

Italian Culture Study Abroad (ITA 3952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Tessere La Lingua/Weaving Language (ITA 4730) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2221 or permission of instructor
Focuses on the morphology and syntax of the Italian language through the study of a variety of texts belonging to different linguistic registers, times and places.

Directed Independent Study (ITA 4905) 1-3 credits

Special Topics (ITA 4930) 3 credits
Intensive study of authors, genres, literary movements, or themes. May be repeated for credit.

Italian Language and Culture Study Abroad (ITA 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Italian Culture and Society (ITT 2502) 3 credits
Introduction to Italian culture, with study of intellectual, social, historical, and literary trends. Discussion of representative texts and visual material.

Literature in Translation: The Italian Tradition (ITT 3110) 3 credits
Reading and discussion in English of selected works from the full range of Italian literature, including major and minor traditions, genres and individual authors. Course content will vary from such genres as the novella and movements such as Romanticism, to single works or authors, such as the Decameron or Dacia Maraini.

Love and Lovers in Italian Literature (ITT 3111) 3 credits
Analyzes the concept of love and the figure of the Italian lover from the origins of Italian literature to the present. Students read some of the most exciting pages of Italian writers presenting seductive Italian women and men. Taught in English.

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+ = Grading: Pass/fail option

Italian Cinema: from Text to Screen (ITT 3520) 3 credits

A study of the cinema–literature relationship from neorealism to postmodernism. Authors range from Boccaccio to Bassani and directors from De Sica to Nichetti.

Italian Film Classics (ITT 3521) 3 credits
Overview of Italy’s rich cinematic tradition starting from the groundbreaking years of Neorealism to the end of the past century. Taught in English.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Italian-American Cinema (ITT 3522) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
This course offers an overview of the major filmmakers associated with the representation of Italian Americans in the United States film world. Students will view and discuss major filmmakers and their films, and will write critical essays on film topics. Conducted in English.

Italy in Lyrics (ITT 3600) 3 credits
Uses songs and popular music to explore the last two hundred years of Italian history and its major cultural themes. Taught in English.

Italian Culture Study Abroad (in Translation) (ITT 3956) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Dante: The Commedia in Translation (ITT 4440) 3 credits
A close reading of a selection of canti from Dante's Divine Comedy with emphasis on the linguistic-philosophical and theological concerns of Dante Alighieri against the backdrop of the historical and political climate of his times.

Italian Literature and Civilization: Middle Ages and Renaissance (ITW 3100) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2221 or equivalent
Study of major literary, intellectual, and cultural developments beginning in the Middle Ages and including readings from Dante, Boccaccio, the Neoplatonics, Machiavelli, Ariosto, and Tasso.

Italian Literature and Civilization: Baroque to Present (ITW 3101) 3 credits
Prerequisite: ITA 2221 or equivalent
Study of major literary, intellectual, and cultural developments from 1700 to the present, with readings from Goldoni, Vico, Leopardi, D'Annunzio, Pirandello, and including Futurism, Existentialism, Postmodernism.

Directed Independent Study (ITW 4905) 1-3 credits
Reading and research in advanced subjects in Italian. For third- and fourth-year students in good standing only, with the program of study prearranged in consultation with instructor.

Italian Literature Study Abroad (ITW 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Honors Thesis in Italian (ITW 4972) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Intense reading and writing leading to completion of an honors thesis on a topic related to a theoretical or critical aspect of Italian literature and/or culture.

Beginning Japanese Language and Culture 1 (JPN 1120) 4 credits
Beginning study of Japanese language and culture. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

+Beginning Japanese Language and Culture 2 (JPN 1121) 4 credits
Prerequisite: JPN 1120 or equivalent
Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension in the cultural context. Practice in reading and writing. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or equivalent.

+Intermediate Japanese Language and Culture 1 (JPN 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: JPN 1121 or equivalent
Emphasis on communication skills in the cultural context and grammar. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

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Intermediate Japanese Language and Culture 2 (JPN 2221) 4 credits
Prerequisite: JPN 2220 or equivalent
Continuation of emphasis on communication skills in the cultural context, with special attention to grammar review. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent.

+Japanese Language and Culture Study Abroad (JPN 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Directed Independent Study (JPN 4905) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading and research in advanced subjects in Japanese. For third- and fourth-year students only, with a program of study prearranged in consultation with instructor.

Special Topics (JPN 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Intensive study of various aspects of Japanese literature or language. Occasionally available in English for non-majors. May be repeated for credit.

Japanese Language and Culture Study Abroad (JPN 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Japanese Calligraphy (JPT 2021) 1 credit
Practice in the techniques of drawing Japanese and Chinese characters with a brush and sumi ink.

Japanese Culture and Civilization (JPT 2501) 3 credits
Introduction to Japanese culture, with study of major literary, intellectual and social trends from the Nara period to the present. Reading and discussion of representative texts. Course conducted in English.

Japanese Literature and Cinema (JPT 2520) 3 credits
A study of the major writers of Japanese modern literature and screen adaptations of their works, as well as a study of major filmmakers such as Ozu, Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, etc.

Literature in Translation: The Japanese Tradition (JPT 3100) 3 credits
Survey of the major texts of Japanese literature in translation from the 8th century through the 20th century.

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+ = Grading: Pass/fail option

Japanese Culture Study Abroad (in Translation) (JPT 3956) 1-4 credits

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Japanese Literature Study Abroad (JPW 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Introduction to Latin American Studies (LAS 2000) 3 credits
This course is a required introductory course for the Caribbean and Latin American Studies Certificate and is designed to provide students with an understanding of the history, literature and culture of the Latin American region. While drawing on examples from specific Latin American nations, the course is broadly comparative, considering a number of substantive themes as they apply to the entire region and as they are related to world
powers, multinational actors and global economic structures. This is a General Education course.

Beginning Latin 1 (LAT 1120) 4 credits
Intensive introductory study of the Latin language with emphasis on reading, translation, grammatical analysis, and vocabulary. The translation of passages adapted from the ancient authors also provides an incidental acquaintance with Roman values, life, and culture.

Beginning Latin 2 (LAT 1121) 4 credits
Prerequisite: LAT 1120

Intensive introductory study of the Latin language with emphasis on reading, translation, grammatical analysis, and vocabulary. Builds on knowledge and skills acquired in Latin 1. The translation of passages adapted from the ancient authors also provides an incidental acquaintance with Roman values, life, and culture.

Intermediate Latin 1 (LAT 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: LAT 1121 or equivalent
For students who have successfully taken one year of college Latin, this course introduces advanced grammar, syntax, and stylistics of Latin prose. The focus is on translation with a parallel discussion of the texts in the historical frame of the late Republican and early Imperial periods.

Global Perspectives on Language (LIN 2607) 3 credits
Course explores language from a global perspective. It addresses the complex relationship between language and culture, emphasizing the role of English as a global language, and also examines the U.S. as a multilingual society as this relates to race, ethnicity, the role of the media, and other issues. This is a General Education course.

Language Matters (LIN 3003) 3 credits
For students of all backgrounds, an exploration of the most common myths and controversies about language.

Introduction to Linguistics (LIN 3010) 3 credits
The modern scientific study of pronunciation, word structure, syntax, semantics, language history, geographical and social dialects, first and second language acquisition, and writing systems. Open to non-majors.

Patterns of Language (LIN 3133) 3 credits
Course offers insight into the basic theoretical principles and concepts of linguistic analysis, specifically phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics as applied to written and oral texts.

Contrastive Phonology (LIN 4326) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
A phonetic and phonemic level comparison of the phonology of English, French, German and Spanish. Recommended for teachers and students of these four languages.

Morphology and Syntax (LIN 4430) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010
Introduces students to basic concepts and issues in current morphological and syntactic theory. Focuses on knowledge of the structure of words, phrases and sentences, how such knowledge may be represented and what it reveals about the nature of human language.

Sociolinguistics (LIN 4600) 3 credits
An introduction to the study of language and linguistic behavior as influenced by social and cultural factors.

African-American Vernacular English (LIN 4612) 3 credits
The history, vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, and educational implications (the Ebonics question) of contemporary African-American Vernacular English dialects.

Bilingualism (LIN 4620) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
Language and cognition, language acquisition in the bilingual child, bilingual influences upon learning, the psychological and sociocultural aspects of bilingualism, especially in Spanish-English speaking communities.

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Psycholinguistics (LIN 4701) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
Psychology of language and communication; mechanics of language learning in relation to behavior and thinking.

Semantics and Pragmatics (LIN 4802) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
An introduction to the basic approaches to the study of semantics and pragmatics. Includes fundamental notions of word meanings (lexical semantics), sentence meaning, logic and pragmatics.

Introduction to Semiotics (LIN 4810) 3 credits
Why do people smoke? Why do women wear high heels? This course is intended to introduce students of all backgrounds to basic semiotic concepts and techniques of semiotic analysis.

Directed Independent Study (LIN 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
Reading and research in advanced subjects in Linguistics. For third- and fourth-year students in good standing only, with the program of study prearranged in consultation with instructor.

Special Topics (LIN 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
Intensive study of special topics in linguistics, such as the history and dialectology of a language, experimental phonetics, and trends in morphology and syntax. Since content will vary, course may be repeated for credit.

Honors Thesis in Linguistics (LIN 4972) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Intense reading and writing leading to completion of an honors thesis on a topic related to linguistics.

University Honors Seminar in Literature (LIT 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in literature.

Introduction to World Literature (LIT 2100) 3 credits
A variable topics course focusing on perennial aspects of human experience through the comparative study of world literature. This is a General Education course.

Introduction to Comparative Literature (LIT 3060) 3 credits
Prerequisite: 2 terms of upper-division literature in two languages
Critical methods and principles in contemporary comparative critical practice. Visiting faculty from other disciplines.

New Testament (LIT 3374) 3 credits
An historical and literary approach to the Bible text and the methods modern scholars use to understand it. Covers the content and historical setting of the New Testament in Jewish and Greco-Roman culture, as well as the style and genre of different books.

Comparative Literature (LIT 4061) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, Italian, or Spanish
Selected topics requiring investigation of related literary and intellectual movements across national boundaries, with particular attention to writers of international significance.

Comparative Postmodernism (LIT 4098) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, or Spanish
Emphasis on postmodernist fiction, its apparent international acceptance, its aesthetics and poetics. Readings include Borges, Pynchon, Lyotard, Barth, Sarduy, Sollers, Vega.

Comparative Caribbean Literature (LIT 4194) 3 credits
This course uses a general comparative approach to explore key themes and concepts in Caribbean literature. Students are encouraged to read texts in lingua, although English translations are also be available. The course shows continuities and differences within the heterogeneous Caribbean textual archipelago.

Comparative Renaissance Studies (LIT 4250) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, Italian, or Spanish
Comparative Renaissance literature from Italian beginnings through Montaigne, with special attention to the role of humanism and to new narrative genres.

Comparative Realism and Naturalism (LIT 4251) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, or Spanish
Comparative study of Euro-American Realism and naturalism from 19th-century origins, as literary movements, to the present, with emphasis on narrative and on social criticism.

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+ = Grading: Pass/fail option

Comparative Modernism and the Avant-Gardes (LIT 4252) 3 credits

Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, Italian, or Spanish
Comparative European avant-gardes in the context of modernism, with emphasis on Dada, Futurism, surrealism, expressionism, and constructivism in England, France, Germany, Italy, and Russia.

Comparative European Romanticism (LIT 4604) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, Italian, or Spanish
Romanticism as a European movement. Study of representative poetry and prose in French, German, and English literatures with emphasis on literary and intellectual relations. Readings in Rousseau, Goethe, Novalis, Chateaubriand, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Mary Shelley, Eichendorff, Lamartine, Hugo.

Special Topics (LIT 4930) 3 credits
Specialized aspects of literature. May be repeated for credit.

Beginning Spanish Language and Culture 1 (SPN 1120) 4 credits
Beginning study of Spanish language and culture. For students with little or no experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent, who may substitute it with SPN 1340. Credit may not be awarded for SPN 1120 and SPN 1340.

Beginning Spanish Language and Culture 2 (SPN 1121) 4 credits
Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Practice in reading and writing. For students with some experience in the language. Not open to native speakers or equivalent, who may substitute it with SPN 1340. Credit may not be awarded for SPN 1121 and SPN 1340.

Intensive Beginning Spanish (SPN 1150) 8 credits
This course combines SPN 1120 and 1121 in an intensive, one-semester unit. Emphasis is placed on speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing. For students with little or no background in the language. Not open to native speakers or the equivalent, who may substitute it with SPN 1340.

Beginning Spanish for Heritage Speakers (SPN 1340) 4 credits
For students with little or no formal instruction in Spanish who can understand casual spoken Spanish and have a passive knowledge of it with limited oral fluency. Emphasis is on basic grammar, written accents, orthography and writing. Course includes the study of culture and civilization of the Hispanic world and its diversity. Fulfills foreign language requirement. Credit may not be awarded for SPN 1340 and SPN 1120 or SPN 1121.

Spanish for Careers (SPN 2161) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 1121
This course focuses on the vocabulary needed for the workplace, the grammar to complete the basic skills sequence, and task-based practical skills. Knowledge of basic Spanish (1121) is a prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits when content varies.

Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture 1 (SPN 2220) 4 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 1121 or SPN 1150 or equivalent
Emphasis on communication skills and grammar. Not open to native speakers or equivalent, who may substitute it with SPN 2341. Credit may not be awarded for SPN 2220 and SPN 2341.

Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture 2 (SPN 2221) 4 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 2220 or equivalent
Continuation of emphasis on communication skills, with special attention to grammar review. Not open to native speakers or equivalent, who may substitute it with SPN 2341. Credit may not be awarded for SPN 2221 and SPN 2341.

Intermediate Spanish Conversation (SPN 2240) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 1121 or equivalent

Emphasis on aural comprehension and speaking facility, practice using topical materials. Not open to students who have completed SPN 2221 or native speakers or equivalent.

Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers (SPN 2341) 4 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 1340 or permission of instructor
For students who have already taken SPN 1340 or who have studied Spanish at a basic level and can understand casual spoken Spanish and have some ability in speaking, reading and writing Spanish. Emphasis on further developing writing skills and understanding of grammar. Course includes the study of culture and civilization of the Hispanic world. Fulfills foreign language requirement. Credit may not be awarded for SPN 2341 and SPN 2220 or SPN 2221.

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+Spanish Language and Culture Study Abroad (SPN 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Advanced Spanish for Heritage Speakers (SPN 3343) 4 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 2341 or permission of instructor
For students who have already taken SPN 2341 or who have studied Spanish at an advanced level and have functional abilities in the language. Emphasis is on consolidating and broadening thinking, research and writing skills and perfecting grammar ability in order to write scholarly papers in Spanish on language, literature or culture. Fulfills foreign language requirement. Credit may not be awarded for SPN 3343 and SPN 3400.

Advanced Spanish: Grammar (SPN 3400) 4 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 2221 or permission of instructor
Intensive review of advanced grammar through written work and conversation. Students learn how to express themselves in writing and orally, using literary texts. SPN 3400 is not open to native speakers or heritage speakers (who may substitute SPN 2340 or SPN 3343, depending on ability). Credit may not be awarded for SPN 3400 and SPN 3343.

Advanced Spanish: Composition (SPN 3401) 4 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343, or permission of instructor
Writing is the main activity of this course. Students get extensive practice in preparing various types of written essays based on written and visual texts. Through regular practice, revision, and using a variety of genres, expository and imaginative, student will improve their written proficiency and increase their vocabulary in Spanish.

Advanced Spanish: Conversation (SPN 3410) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 2221 or equivalent or permission of instructor
An advanced conversation class designed to develop students’ ability to communicate more fluently in Spanish and discuss a wide variety of cultural topics relating to Spain and Latin America.

Commercial Spanish 1 (SPN 3440) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 2221 or SPN 2340 or SPN 3343 or permission of instructor
Fundamentals of commercial and administrative Spanish usage and correspondence. Introduction to relevant aspects of Spanish and Latin American commerce.

Commercial Spanish 2 (SPN 3441) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 2221 or SPN 2340 or SPN 3343 or permission of instructor
Fundamentals of commercial and administrative Spanish usage and correspondence. Introduction to relevant aspects of Spanish and Latin American commerce.

Spanish Peninsular Culture and Civilization (SPN 3500) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: SPN 3343 or SPN 3400 or permission of instructor
The aim of this course is to promote the knowledge and understanding of Spanish culture and civilization by presenting and investigating the origin and development of the ideas, behavior, and customs of the Iberian peninsula.

Latin American Culture and Civilization (SPN 3501) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: SPN 3343 or SPN 3400 or permission of instructor
The aim of this course is to promote the knowledge and understanding of Latin American culture and civilization by presenting and investigating the origin and development of Latin American ideas, behavior, and customs.

Spanish Culture Study Abroad (SPN 3952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

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Spanish Sociolinguistics (SPN 4740) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343 or permission of instructor
This course is an introduction to the field of Spanish sociolinguistics. It covers such topics as social stratification in language, social and dialectal variants, language and gender, diglossia, code-switching, Spanish in the U.S., and bilingualism in Spanish-speaking countries.

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology (SPN 4790) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343 or permission of instructor
An introduction to the study of Spanish phonology and dialectology. Detailed analysis of the sound system and the phonological processes of Spanish with a dialectology component.

Structure of Modern Spanish (SPN 4850) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343 or permission of instructor
Analysis of the structure of Spanish including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Systematic comparison with English.

Special Topics in Spanish Language Studies (SPN 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 3400 or equivalent or SPN 3343

Intensive study of aspects of the Spanish language. Since content will vary, course may be repeated for credit.

Internship in Applied Spanish (SPN 4942) 1-6 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343, and permission of Spanish advisor
Interns work in a University-approved international or national organization related to the Spanish-speaking community and a chosen academic field, gaining critical experience in community organization, local politics, social services, translation, education, or journalism. This internship is unique because students work in the target language.

Spanish Language and Culture Study Abroad (SPN 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs. Since the content may vary, the course may be repeated for credit.

Hispanic Culture and Civilization (SPT 2530) 3 credits
The culture and heritage of Spain, and the cultural development of Latin America from pre-Columbian civilization to the present, through the study of literary texts in contexts of history, geography, art, attitudes and customs (taught in English).

Literature in Translation: The Spanish Tradition (SPT 3100) 3 credits
Selected texts from the full range of Spanish and Latin American literature, including major and minor traditions and genres. Content will vary from such genres as drama, narrative, and poetry to single works such as Don Quixote de la Mancha and One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Spanish Culture Study Abroad (in Translation) (SPT 3956) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Latin American Literature in Translation (SPT 4130) 3 credits
The whole range of Latin American literature, from the conquest to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the role of literature in the culture. Course and readings are in English.

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Spanish Literature and Film (SPT 4720) 3 credits
Study of literary and cinematographic technique in Spanish films from the 1920s to the present.

Spanish Translation (SPT 4800) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 3400 or equivalent or SPN 3343, and permission of instructor
Development of specialized translation skills, with work on literary, scientific, commercial, legal and general topics. Open to native and non-native speakers of Spanish in all majors who already possess a high degree of fluency in both English and Spanish.

Spanish Language and Culture Study Abroad (SPT 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Introduction to Peninsular Spanish Literature (SPW 3012) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343 with minimum grades of "C" or permission of instructor
Course assists students in developing critical reading, writing and thinking skills through close reading and analysis of prose, poetry, essay and drama selected from Peninsular Spanish literary texts.

Introduction to Spanish American Literature (SPW 3020) 3 credits

Prerequisite: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343 with minimum grades of "C" or permission of instructor
Course assists students in developing critical reading, writing and thinking skills through close reading and analysis of prose, poetry, essay and drama selected from Spanish American literary texts.

Introduction to Hispanic Literature (SPW 3030) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 3400 or SPN 3343 or permission of instructor
A preparatory course for students intending to pursue studies in Hispanic literature. Selected readings will provide the basis for stylistic and textural analysis and understanding of the structure of literary works. The historical development of genre and the technical vocabulary necessary for critical analysis will also be included.

Spanish Peninsular Civilization and Literature: to 1700 (SPW 3100) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPW 3030 or permission of instructor
Study of major literary, social and intellectual trends including the Renaissance and Baroque. Reading and discussion of representative texts.

Spanish Peninsular Civilization and Literature: 1700 to the Present (SPW 3101) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPW 3030 or permission of instructor
Study of major literary, social and intellectual trends including Classicism, Romanticism and Realism. Reading and discussion of representative texts.

Latin American Civilization and Literature: Conquest to Modernism (SPW 3130) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPW 3030 or permission of instructor
Study of major social, intellectual and literary trends in Latin America. Reading and discussion of representative texts.

Latin American Civilization and Literature: Modernism (SPW 3131) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPW 3030 or permission of instructor
Study of the major writers of Modernism in several genres: poetry, short story, novel and essay, by Ruben Darío, José Martí, Manuel Gutierez Najera, Julian Del Casal, Jose Asuncion Silva, Jose Enrique Rodo and Carlos Reyles.

Latin American Civilization and Literature: Modernism to the Present (SPW 3132) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPW 3030 or permission of instructor
The major currents in Latin American literature, from the novel of the Mexican Revolution through the 1940s and 1950s to the phenomenon of the Boom and the achievements of contemporary writers.

Género Policiaco (SPW 4583) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPN 3400 and SPN 3343
Introduces the genre of crime fiction in the Hispanic world through a series of theoretical articles and films establishing a correlation between the genre’s development in the respective countries and other literary manifestations worldwide.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Directed Independent Study (SPW 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading and research in advanced subjects in Spanish. For third- and fourth-year students in good standing only, with the program of study arranged in consultation with instructor.

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Special Topics in Spanish or Latin American Literature (SPW 4930) 1-3 credits

Intensive study of Spanish or Latin American authors, genres, or literary movements. Occasionally available in English for non-majors. Since content will vary each term, course may be repeated for credit.

Spanish Literature Study Abroad (SPW 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Honors Thesis in Spanish (SPW 4972) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Intense reading and writing leading to completion of an honors thesis on a topic related to a theoretical or critical aspect of Peninsular or Latin American literature and/or culture.

Applied Linguistics and TESOL (TSL 4251) 3 credits
Applying linguistics, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics to teaching English as a second language with emphasis on pronunciation, intonation, structural analysis, morphophonemics and decoding from print to sound.

Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature Graduate Courses

Students should direct questions concerning the Advanced Competency Examination in the major language and placement in language courses to the Chair of the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature.

Electronic Media and Foreign Language Pedagogy (FLE 5876) 3 credits
Both theoretical and practical in orientation, this course will focus on the use of electronic media, chiefly the World Wide Web and computer interactive resources in the teaching of foreign languages. Classical and recent theories of second language acquisition will be reviewed in the context of electronic applications. Software and hardware options for different teaching methods will be assessed, although the course emphasis is on the communicative method for developing primarily oral skills. Students will develop one set of original teaching materials for a first-year course in beginning Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, or Spanish.

Special Topics (FLE 5930) 3 credits
Reading and research in advanced topics in foreign language teaching. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Research in Foreign Language Learning Theories (FLE 6892) 3 credits
Overview of current research on second-language acquisition. Introduction to current language teaching methodologies and assessment of their practical relevance for the foreign-language classroom.

Readings in Languages and Linguistics (FOL 6900) 1-3 credits
The course is designed to give graduate students a structured preparation of the reading list for their comprehensive written or oral examinations. May be repeated for credit. Grading: S/U

History and Theory of Translation (FOT 6807) 3 credits
Prerequisites: B.A. in literary or linguistic field or equivalent
History and theory of translation in Europe and in the Americas beginning with the early Roman translators and continuing through Medieval, Renaissance, Neoclassical, Modernist, and Post-colonial theory and practice. The course poses questions about language and meaning, canon and culture, and cross-cultural communication.

Topics in Translation Studies (FOT 6930C) 3 credits
One of the foundational courses in the translation track, this course covers a specific aspect of translation studies. The focus and content are variable. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, Post-colonial Theories of Translation, the Multilingual City, Self-Translation, Four Classics and Their Versions. May be repeated for credit once.

Reading for Research in French (FRE 5060) 3 credits
Study of grammar and vocabulary needed to do basic research in French. Some previous study recommended but not required. Not open to majors. Grading: S/U

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History and Dialectology of French (FRE 6835) 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: FRE 2220 or equivalent; LIN 3010 strongly recommended

Linguistic development of French from Latin to the present. Linguistic geography of French dialects, including Haitian French Creole and Canadian French.

Internship in French (FRE 6946) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
For the MAT in French, students are required to do an internship with a faculty member who is teaching FRW 3001, FRE 3400, FRE 3401 or FRE 3393. Students attend each class session and prepare/teach several classes over the course of the semester. Students also participate in the design, grading and evaluation of exams, term papers and other semestrial projects.

Master's Thesis (FRE 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Theory and Practice of French/English Translation (FRT 5804) 3 credits
Introduction to the theory and practice of French/English literary translation. The translation practice is selected carefully to question as well as to illuminate theoretical problems. Content will vary; course may be repeated once for credit.

French/English Translation Workshop (FRT 5807) 3 credits
A workshop in which students acquire hands-on, literary translation practice by translating a selection of literary texts covering different periods and genres. Content will vary; course may be repeated once for credit.

Contemporary French Critical Theory (FRT 6826) 3 credits
Major issues in contemporary French critical theory, including the relations of language and materialism, elements of structuralism and semiology, theories of subjective communication and exchange, feminist issues, the Lacanian symbolic order. Reading and discussion of Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Benveniste, Barthes, Derrida, Foucault, Lacan. Taught in English.

Histoire Littéraire (FRW 6105) 3 credits
Course examines the French literary tradition as a whole, focusing on problems of interpretation and definition. Students read a wide variety of foundational texts from different time periods in conjunction with secondary critical studies to understand and call into question such long-established literary concepts such as period, genre, history, representation, and mode.

L'Auteur Médiéval (FRW 6418) 3 credits
Prerequisites: FOL 3880, FRW 3100 or equivalents
In-depth study of seminal medieval texts key to the formulation of medieval authorship. In addition to primary readings, students also read contemporary critical theory on authorship to gain a deeper understanding of how postmodern and medieval conceptions of authorship might converge or diverge.

Debattre la Renaissance (Debating the Renaissance) (FRW 6426) 3 credits
Prerequisite: FOL 3880 or equivalent
Study of Renaissance literature and society through the lens of debate as intellectual form in the neoplatonic, humanist, and scholastic contexts. Emphasis on Querelle des Femmes and Renaissance theories of gender in exploring figurations of women in humanist and neoplatonic debate.

19th-Century French Fiction (FRW 6465) 3 credits
Seminar readings and discussions of such major 19th-century novelists as Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, and Zola. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

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20th-Century French Fiction (FRW 6485) 3 credits
Seminar readings and discussions of such major modern prose artists as Proust, Celine, Beckett, and the novelists of the 1950s. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

French Modernism (FRW 6541) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Addresses the transformations of subjectivities, aesthetics and societies that took place in France from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1930s and that is referred to in terms of sociopolitical “modernity” or cultural “modernism.” Examines the transformations and innovations that took place in literature and art of that period.

L'Entre Deux-Guerres (FRW 6613) 3 credits
Study of early Modernism and such avant-gardes as Dada, Cubism, Futurism, in the context of contemporary theories of mind (Bergson, Freud) and conflicting political ideologies (Communism, Fascism).

Independence and Disenchantment: the Case of Arab Francophone Literature (FRW 6781) 1-3 credits
Explores the period extending from the independence of the Arab Francophone countries until now. Through readings, film viewings and class discussion, the course traces the evolution of the "Arab disenchantment" from the end of combat literature to present day, while at the same time, highlighting the specificities of each country's history.

Master's Thesis (FRW 6971) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Independent reading and research in preparation of a master’s thesis. Grading: S/U

Modern French Women Writers (FRW 6795) 3 credits
Reading and discussion of major French modern and contemporary women writers with particular attention to their varying approaches to problems of subjectivity, and including texts by Colette, Sarraute, Beauvior, Rochefort, Duras, Cixous, Wittig, and others.

Directed Independent Study (FRW 6908) 1-3 credits
Independent reading and research in advanced topics and by permission of the instructor only. The program of study is arranged in consultation with instructor during the term prior to the student's taking the course.

Seminar in French and Francophone Literature (FRW 6938) 3 credits
Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Reading for Research in German (GER 5060) 3 credits
Study of grammar and vocabulary needed to do basic research in German. Some previous study recommended but not required. Not open to majors. Grading: S/U

History and Dialectology of German (GER 6835) 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: GER 2220 or equivalent; LIN 3010 strongly recommended
A survey of the historical development of the German language. Introduction to historical linguistics and sociolinguistics.

Master's Thesis (GER 6971) 1-6 credits

Directed Independent Study (GEW 6908) 1-3 credits
Independent reading and research in advanced topics and by permission of the instructor only. The program of study is arranged in consultation with the instructor during the term prior to the student taking the course.

Seminar in German Literature (GEW 6938) 3 credits
Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Italian/English Translation Workshop (ITT 5807) 3 credits
A workshop in which students acquire hands-on, literary translation practice by translating a selection of literary texts covering different periods and genres. Content will vary; course may be repeated once for credit.

Italian Culture through Film (ITT 6524) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Course studies selected key events in recent Italian history through their reflections in film. Students “read” movies treating them as “history texts” and examples of historical emplotment, while furthering their knowledge of Italy’s recent past, between the nation’s unification and the “years of lead.”

Theory and Practice of Italian/English Translation (ITT 6805) 3 credits
Introduction to the theory and practice of Italian/English literary translation. The translation practice is selected carefully to question as well as to illuminate theoretical problems. Content will vary; course may be repeated once for credit.

Modern and Contemporary Italian Fiction (ITW 6485) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
This seminar provides readings and discussions of major Italian prose writers such as Calvino, Deluca, Eco, Levi, Maraini, Palazzeschi, Pasolini, Pirandello, Sciascia, and Vittorini. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

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Directed Independent Study (ITW 6908) 1-3 credits
Independent reading and research in advanced topics in Italian studies, arranged in consultation with and with permission of the instructor during the term prior to the student's taking the course.

Seminar in Italian Literature (ITW 6938) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
This is a special topics seminar in which specific themes are studied. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Master's Thesis (ITW 6971) 1-6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Independent reading and research in advanced topics for the research and writing of a master's thesis in Comparative Literature with an emphasis in Italian. The program of study is arranged in consultation with the instructor during the term prior to the student taking the course.

Linguistics and Reading (LIN 5745) 3 credits
The application of linguistic knowledge to the teaching of reading through an examination of the rules of structural analysis, spelling, phonics, phonemics, morphophonemics, phonetics, and dialectology.

Principles of Linguistic Analysis (LIN 6135) 3 credits
Course is an introduction to the core basics of linguistics and an apprenticeship to linguistic analysis for graduate students in their first semester of master's programs of study.

Foundations of Linguistic Theory (LIN 6150) 3 credits
This course is intended to introduce students of linguistics and neighboring disciplines to the major currents in linguistic theory. Beginning with a brief overview of the history of linguistics, the course concentrates on seminal texts of recurrent interdisciplinary significance that characterize major theoretical frameworks.

Morphology and Syntax (LIN 6585) 3 credits
Contemporary techniques of grammatical description and practice in the analysis of grammatical structure.

Sociolinguistics (LIN 6601) 3 credits
A seminar on sociolinguistics with particular emphasis on an examination of the history, structure (sounds, grammar, and vocabulary), and educational implications of Black English, also known as African American Vernacular English (AAVE).

Bilingualism (LIN 6622) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
Course constitutes a graduate introduction to the field of bilingualism. Topics such as language and cognition, language acquisition in the bilingual child, and bilingual education will be covered. A range of other issues that relate to bilingual/multilingual contexts provides a multifaceted background for the course.

Grammaticalization (LIN 6674) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
Course constitutes a graduate introduction to the fundamental concepts of grammaticalization. Students learn the key notions in the field while gaining an overall understanding of the nature of grammatical change, in particular, and language change, in general.

Second Language Acquisition (LIN 6720) 3 credits
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or permission of instructor
A survey of theoretical models of communicative competence and second-language acquisition and a discussion of the practical implications of these models for instruction and assessment, including the application of course concepts to authentic second/foreign language data.

Directed Independent Study (LIN 6908) 1-4 credits
Independent reading and research in advanced topics and by permission of the instructor only. The program of study is arranged in consultation with the instructor during the term prior to the student taking the course.

Seminar in Linguistics (LIN 6938) 2-4 credits
Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Master's Thesis (LIN 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Seminar in Literature (LIT 5937) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Intensive study of a period, movement, or major literary figures. Research paper is required. The course may be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the Comparative Study of Literature (LIT 6066) 3 credits
Prerequisites: B.A. degree and reading-level second language
An introduction to the comparative study of literary phenomena (genres, themes, movements, and periods) from the perspective of Continental, English, and American literatures, including translation theory and analysis.

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Women Writing: The Caribbean (LIT 6388) 3 credits
Exploration of Caribbean women writers' struggles. Attention given to the French- and Spanish-speaking Caribbean women issues, such as slavery; suffrage; literary, racial, and gender discrimination; and religious beliefs.

Myth and the Bible (LIT 6416) 3 credits

Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Explores the role and significance of mythology, focusing on ancient near Eastern traditions and their relationship to the Old Testament, particularly the early chapters of Genesis.

Special Topics (LIT 6934) 3 credits
Specialized aspects of literature. May be repeated for credit.

Master's Thesis (LIT 6971) 1-6 credits

Portuguese for Global Business Purposes 1 (POR 5445) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Intermediate level achievement in Portuguese as measured by the New York University Foreign Language Proficiency Exam
Introductory language module for MSIB students. Emphasis on written and oral presentation skills in target language. Practice of advanced grammar structures; acquisition of specialized business vocabulary related to corporate organization and management structures.

Portuguese for Global Business Purposes 2 (POR 5446) 3 credits
Prerequisite: POR 5445 and graduate standing in MSIB program
Introductory language module for MSIB students. Emphasis on written and oral presentation skills in target language. Practice of advanced grammar structures; acquisition of specialized business vocabulary related to financial analysis, production processes, and real estate.

Reading for Research in Spanish (SPN 5060) 3 credits
Study of grammar and vocabulary needed to do basic research in Spanish. Some previous study recommended but not required. Not open to majors. Grading: S/U

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology (SPN 6795) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor; SPN 3400 and LIN 3010
A graduate introduction to the study of Spanish phonology and dialectology. Detailed analysis of the sound system and the phonological processes of Spanish with a dialectology component.

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History and Dialectology of Spanish (SPN 6835) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPN 3400 or equivalent; LIN 3010 strongly recommended
Linguistic development of Spanish from Latin to the present. Attention to changes taking place in present-day language.

Directed Independent Study (SPN 6908) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Independent reading and research in advanced topics related to teaching the Spanish language. The program of study is arranged in consultation with the instructor during the term prior to the student taking the course.

Internship in Spanish (SPN 6946) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
For the M.A.T. in Spanish, students are required to do an internship with a faculty member who is teaching any of the 3000-level courses on language and culture or introduction to literature. Students attend the class every day and prepare for and teach several classes during the semester. In addition, students participate in the design and grading of exams, evaluations of term papers and other projects.

Master's Thesis (SPN 6971) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

Spanish English Translation Workshop (SPT 5846) 3 credits
A workshop in which students acquire hands-on, literary translation practice by translating a selection of literary texts covering different periods and genres. Content will vary; course may be repeated once for credit.

Women and Theatre in Latin America (SPT 6215) 3 credits
This course will focus on the depiction of women in 20th-century Latin American theatre as reflected in plays written by both men and women. Includes texts by Isabel Aguirre, Sabina Berman, Rosario Castellanos, Mario Vargas Llosa, Carlos Fuentes, and others.

Contemporary Latina Writing in the United States (SPT 6315) 3 credits
Reading and discussion of major contemporary Latina writers with particular attention to their varying approaches to problems of identity and exile. Includes texts by Gloria Anzaldúa, Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Cristina García, Judith Ortiz Cofer, and others.

Theory and Practice of Spanish/English Literary Translation (SPT 6845) 3 credits
Introduction to the theory and practice of Spanish/English literary translation. The translation practice is selected carefully to question as well as to illuminate theoretical problems. Content will vary; course may be repeated once for credit.

Contemporary Latin American and Spanish Literature (SPW 6005) 3 credits
A comparison of trends in Spanish and Latin American literature in their cultural, aesthetic, and historical contexts.

Seminar in Colonial Spanish-American Literature (SPW 6135) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature
An introduction to colonial Spanish-American literature from the initial encounter through the independence period. A selection of representative texts from multiple genres and perspectives will be read and discussed.

Latin American Women Writers (SPW 6206) 3 credits
Study and discussion of representative works by Latin American women writers of the 20th century, with emphasis upon Rosario Castellanos, Isabel Allende, Rosario Ferré, Elena Garro, Elena Poniatowska.

Latin American Prose (SPW 6218) 3 credits
The analysis and criticism of Latin American prose. The topic of the course will vary, dealing usually with one author or period.

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20th-Century Latin American Theatre (SPW 6306) 3 credits
The study and analysis of representative plays by contemporary 20th-century Latin American writers.

Spanish Post-War Poetry (SPW 6347) 3 credits
An introduction to Spanish poetry in the post-Civil War period and an exploration of the relationship between that poetry and contemporary world literature.

Latin American Poetry (SPW 6356) 3 credits
The analysis and criticism of Spanish-American poetry. The topic of the course will vary, dealing usually with one author or period.

The Latin American Short Story (SPW 6375) 3 credits
Reading and discussion of representative short stories by Latin American writers from 1839 to the present, with analysis of Romanticist, Indianist, and Modernist writings including texts by Ruben Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Rosario Castellanos, Alejo Carpentier, Luisa Valenzuela, and several others.

Spanish Golden Age Literature (SPW 6427) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SPW 3012 or SPW 3020
Analysis of the culture and literary trends during the Renaissance and the Baroque through reading of prose, poetry, and drama.

Spanish Romanticism (SPW 6535) 3 credits
Study of the diverse literary manifestations of the Spanish Romantic movement in drama, prose, and poetry.

Transatlantic Studies: Writing in the Frontiers of the Spanish Empire
(SPW 6596) 3 credits

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature
Graduate seminar taught in Spanish and dedicated to the study of literary texts produced in Spain and Latin America during the Golden Age. Special emphasis on transAtlantic influences and debates that affected both the metropolis and the colonies.

Generation of 1898 (SPW 6729) 3 credits
Cultural and social precedents of the 1898 crisis in Spain and study of its literary manifestations.

Introduction of Literary Theory and the Hispanic Tradition (SPW 6826) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature
Introductory seminar on general literary theory as well as specific theoretical texts from Latin America and Spain. Taught in Spanish, the course surveys the most important critical theories of the 20th century, with emphasis on Hispanic contributions.

Directed Independent Study (SPW 6908) 1-3 credits
Independent reading and research in advanced topics and by permission of the instructor only. The program of study is arranged in consultation with the instructor during the term prior to the student taking the course.

Seminar in Spanish Literature (SPW 6938) 3 credits
Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Special Topics in Spanish-American Literature (SPW 6939) 3 credits

Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Master's Thesis (SPW 6971) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Independent reading and research in preparation for a master's thesis.

Applied Linguistics and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
(TSL 6252) 3 credits

Prerequisite: LIN 3010
An analysis of phonological, morphological, and syntactic features of English as well as the nature of its spelling system for teachers of English as a second language.

Music Courses
(Listed following the Women's Studies courses, under School of the Arts, Music)

Philosophy


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Ancient Philosophy (PHH 3100) 3 credits
Major philosophers and movements from the pre-Socratics to Augustine, with primary attention to Plato, Aristotle and Augustine.

Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (PHH 3280) 4 credits
A careful and in-depth examination of the philosophers of the medieval period and of the 14th to 16th centuries. The course may include the reading of original texts, secondary sources, or both. Special attention is paid to metaphysics, logic, ethics, and political philosophy.

Early Modern Philosophy (PHH 3420) 4 credits
A careful and in-depth examination of major European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries. The course may include the reading of original texts, secondary sources, or both. Special attention is paid to philosophical methods, presuppositions, and contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, and political philosophy.

American Philosophy (PHH 3700) 3 credits
Inquiry into views of various American philosophical thinkers from 17th century to present. Jefferson, Thoreau, Dewey, Peirce, James, Whitehead, Quine, Rawls, and Macklin are among the thinkers to be considered. Specific emphasis will be placed on their contributions to political philosophy, value theory, religion, logic and philosophy of science.

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Late Modern Philosophy (PHH 4440) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PHH 3420 or permission of instructor
A careful examination of major philosophers from Kant to Nietzsche. The following philosophers are included: Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Bentham, Mill, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Original works are examined with attention paid to philosophical methods, presuppositions and contributions to the theory of knowledge, logic, foundations of mathematics, metaphysics, ethics, and social and political philosophy.

University Honors Seminar in Philosophy (PHI 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in philosophy.

Introduction to Philosophy (PHI 2010) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or substitute with grades of "C" or better

An introductory philosophy course that treats major issues of knowledge, ethics, society, mind and body, freedom and religion, with an emphasis on strengthening students' writing skills. This is a General Education course.

Critical Thinking (PHI 2100) 3 credits
This course is designed to strengthen students' critical thinking skills by teaching them to distinguish between well-supported and poorly supported arguments, to understand the nature of assumptions and the importance of providing evidence to support one's conclusions, and to recognize and avoid reasoning errors and argumentative fallacies.

Logic (PHI 2102) 3 credits
Gordon Rule, computational
Introduces students to various forms of reasoning and to informal fallacies. Course also includes an in-depth study of deductive syllogistic logic and concludes by introducing students to the quantification techniques of propositional and predicate logic (first-order symbolic logic). This is a General Education course.

Philosophy Study Abroad (PHI 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Philosophy of Mind (PHI 3320) 4 credits
This course engages in a careful and in-depth study of some of the major issues and problems in the philosophy of mind, through the reading of original texts and/or secondary sources. The topics examined include, but are not limited to, the mind/body problem, the nature of consciousness, and the problem of personal identity.

Philosophy of Psychiatry (PHI 3453) 3 credits
This course offers an overview of the central issues in the philosophy of psychiatry, such as the notion of the unconscious, responsibility for actions, the concept of the self presupposed by different psychotherapeutic models, and the relation between psychiatric diagnosis and culture, and will consider whether society creates, constructs, or encourages certain pathologies of the soul.

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Moral Problems (PHI 3638) 3 credits
Examines moral problems of contemporary importance, such as animal rights, censorship, a
patient’s right to die, physician-assisted suicide, morality in war and human enhancement. Introduces students to the standard ethical theories that form the foundation of moral deliberation about these issues.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Environmental Ethics (PHI 3640) 3 credits

Study of contemporary environmental philosophy and ethical principles and practical issues related to the natural environment.

Asian Aesthetics and Arts Theories (PHI 3870) 3 credits
This course focuses on the central issues in aesthetics and philosophy of art through a study of some Asian aesthetic philosophies. Students explore influences on contemporary Western philosophy and the arts, while becoming acquainted with a comparative approach in philosophy.

Philosophy of Literature (PHI 3882) 3 credits
A systematic introduction to the philosophy of literature through a study of both philosophical and literary texts. Students will read authors such as Aristotle, Kafka, Freud, Wittgenstein, and Shakespeare.

Philosophy of Science (PHI 4400) 4 credits
An examination of the central concepts of the theory of knowledge within the context of scientific investigation; the nature and structure of scientific knowledge, the nature of formal reasoning, the role of observation, the function of models, the nature of perception, scientific explanation, scientific truth, probabilistic and inductive inference and the nature of causal laws.

Philosophy of the Human and Social Science (PHI 4420) 3 credits
The course introduces students to the philosophical foundations (epistemology) of the human and social sciences and explores many of the methodological issues and problems resulting therefrom.

Biomedical Ethics (PHI 4633) 4 credits
This course acquaints students with the philosophical treatment of biomedical concerns, primarily through analysis of attempts to resolve ethical issues arising from the practice of medicine.

Ethics (PHI 4661) 3 credits
Analysis of moral judgment and moral reasoning. Evaluation of ethical theories, with particular attention to utilitarian, Kantian and 20th-century theories. Study of the application of various ethical approaches to contemporary social problems.

Philosophy of Religion (PHI 4700) 3 credits
Inquiry into classical and contemporary questions regarding the nature and existence of God, religious knowledge and experience, and the language and symbolism of religion.

Aesthetics and Art Theory (PHI 4800) 4 credits
Provides the student with a greater understanding of the arts in personal life and society through knowledge of critical theory and philosophical views of the arts. The main topics discussed will be the nature of art; form, representation, and expression in art; criticism of the arts; and aesthetic experience and value.

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Directed Independent Study (PHI 4905) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and Department Chair
Readings and research in selected issues of philosophy, with a program of study selected in consultation with Departmental faculty.

Special Topics (PHI 4930) 1-4 credits
The study of a special area in philosophy. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Senior Seminar in Philosophy (PHI 4938) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of Department Chair
A writing-intensive, variable topic philosophy course requiring students to write between one and three substantial paper and to read these papers in class. The course is required of all Philosophy majors and must be taken during the fall semester of the senior year. The course is open to Philosophy minors in their senior year by permission of Department Chair.

Philosophy Study Abroad (PHI 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Feminist Philosophy (PHM 3123) 3 credits
This course critically examines philosophy itself, its history, methods and categories of through from a liberationist perspective. The course will introduce students to selected critical works by feminist philosophers and will study core conceptual constellations, such as reason-objectivity-impartiality and sexism-oppression-exclusion. May be taken for credit toward the Women's Studies Program.

Social and Political Philosophy (PHM 3200) 3 credits
An examination of major social and political theorists since the 17th century. Approximately ten thinkers are studied. Problems such as authority and legitimacy, freedom and control, sources of political obedience, and the ideal commonwealth are taken up.

Philosophy of Law (PHM 3400) 3 credits
Provides an introduction to the kinds of theories that have dominated Anglo-American thinking about the nature, function, and point of law, while demonstrating the essential connections between jurisprudence and other areas of general philosophy, e.g., moral philosophy, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, etc.

Philosophy of Technology (PHM 4223) 3 credits
Examination of the nature of technology that reflects philosophically upon its impacts on the individual, and the social, cultural, work, and physical environments. Also examines the relationship between technology, human values and sociopolitical change and control.

Africana Philosophy (PHP 3781) 3 credits
An examination of the concerns and aspirations of certain major philosophical thinkers in the African, African-American, and Afro-Caribbean traditions.

Post-Structuralism (PHP 3792) 3 credits
Introduces students to the structuralist account of language and examines Hegel's holistic, Nietzsche's perspectivist, and Derrida's deconstructivist accounts. The course concludes with an examination Foucault's application of poststructuralist accounts to an understanding of epistemology, power relations, and sexuality.

Phenomenology (PHP 4782) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PHH 4440 or permission of instructor
A careful and in-depth examination of 20th-century phenomenology. The course may include the reading of original texts, secondary sources, or both. Special emphasis is placed on the study of Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, and Beauvoir. Contemporary developments in phenomenology will also be examined.

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Analytical Philosophy (PHP 4784) 4 credits
Prerequisite: PHH 4440 or permission of instructor
A critical examination of 20th-century analytical philosophy. Analysis of logical atomism, logical positivism and ordinary language analysis is provided. Emphasis is placed on original writings of Frege, Peirce, Moore, Russell, Carnap, Ryle, Ayer, Strawson and Quine.

Existentialism (PHP 4786) 3 credits
A careful and in-depth study of the 19th- and 20th-century existentialism. The course may include the reading of original texts, secondary sources, or both. Emphasis is placed on the varieties of existentialism represented by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Fanon, and Beauvoir.

Philosophy Graduate Courses

Renaissance Thought and the Scientific Revolution (PHH 6320) 3 credits
Course examines the thesis that the Scientific Revolution was crucially shaped by the dissemination of hermetic and neo-Platonic currents within the philosophical and scientific culture of the Renaissance. The course addresses these ideas from a critical perspective at the intersection of the history of philosophy, the history of science, and the philosophy of science.

The Phenomenon of the Black Public Intellectual (PHI 6127) 3 credits
Course focuses on several dominant themes constituting the Black intellectual tradition such as the nature and different styles of Black leadership, the role of Black creative intellectuals, the dialectics of race and gender regarding Black leadership, race and conservative Black intellectuals, scholarship and the politics of Black life.

Technology, Environment, and Values (PHI 6326) 3 credits
Course utilizes the perspectives of social, political, economic, and environmental philosophy, as well as ethics and metaphysics. Course analyzes and evaluates the impact of different technologies upon individuals, their physical, economic, social, and cultural environments, and their value and belief systems.

Philosophy of Psychiatry (PHI 6458) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing
Course presents a critical examination of several central issues in the philosophy of psychiatry, such as the unconscious and the unity of the self, the role of narrative in psychiatry, madness and moral responsibility, and the ontology of diagnostic categories.

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Philosophy of Art (PHI 6806) 3 credits
Examination of the basic issues in philosophical aesthetics, such as the definition of art, the nature of artistic expression, the social value of art, and the basis for evaluation of artworks. The aim of the course is to teach the student to think philosophically and critically about the arts.

Pragmatism and the Arts (PHI 6808) 3 credits
Exploration of how pragmatism, America's distinct philosophy, has interpreted the nature, function, and value of the arts, and how its understanding of aesthetics diverges from the dominant European outlook. Readings include the major figures of classical and contemporary pragmatism and are related to art's diverse expression in the genres of literature, music, and visual arts.

Directed Independent Study (PHI 6905) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and chair
Readings and research on selected issues in philosophy, with a program of study selected in consultation with Departmental faculty.

Special Topics (PHI 6930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in an M.A. or Ph.D. program
The intensive study of a special area, problem, or figure in philosophy. Topics will vary. The course itself may be repeated for credit, but specific topics may not be repeated.

Philosophies of Body (PHM 6028) 3 credits
Examining philosophy's diverse theories on the crucial role of embodiment in human experience, this course studies the body's expression in mind, morality, art, sexuality, society, race, gender, and other topics. The readings range from ancient and modern classics to contemporary sources.

Environmental Philosophy (PHM 6035) 3 credits
A study of the ideas that ground current environmental laws and public policy debates concerning land use. Consideration of issues generated by diverse conceptions of the good, diverse characterizations of wilderness, and the variety of opinions regarding wilderness and the wild as something we should value.

Globalization in Philosophical Perspective (PHM 6228) 3 credits
Course provides a comprehensive critical and reflective analysis of the many faces of globalization. It also includes an analysis and evaluation of globalization's implications for individuals and cultures and their political, social, economic, and moral or ethical systems.

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Critical Thinking and Deconstruction (PHP 6793) 3 credits
Analysis of the deconstruction of traditional notions of objective reality and truth. Course suggests some non-absolutist criteria for judging between different perspectives and interpretations. This postmodern critique of traditional notions of objectivity is examined with regard to its implications for the liberal arts as well as for the human, social, and natural sciences.

Marx and Freud (PHP 6810) 3 credits
Given the methodological impact that Marxist ideology and Freudian psychology have had on the disciplines, the aim of this course is to provide a critical understanding of the more significant claims and frameworks developed by Marx and Freud. The course shows how the insights of Marxist and Freudian methodology may be deployed.

Political Science

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Political Science Study Abroad (CPO 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Comparative Politics (CPO 3003) 3 credits
Examination of the methods of comparative political analysis, exploration of institutions and processes in cross-national perspective, and study of selected countries and regions.

Religions and World Politics (CPO 3761) 3 credits
This course will discuss the rise of religious movements worldwide and the impact of religious conflicts on world politics.

Global Development and Inequality of Nations (CPO 4033) 3 credits
Cross-cultural examination of political and economic development in the Third World. Students examine comparatively the evolution of state-society relations, with attention to gender relations, market forces, and public action in promoting or inhibiting development.

Comparative European Politics (CPO 4042) 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: CPO 3003
The comparative study of political culture, institutions, political processes and change in major West European political systems and the European Union.

Politics of the European Union (CPO 4101) 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: CPO 3003
A comprehensive exploration of the politics of the European Union (EU), the main focus of this course is political institutions, issues, and processes of the EU, and how they have evolved since the end of the World War II. Students analyze treaties, policy-making and decision-making, enlargements, and institutions with particular attention to governance, legitimacy, and democracy.

Latin American Politics (CPO 4303) 3 credits
The comparative study of politics in the Latin American region. Problems of democracy, military politics, and revolution and their relation to political development. May be used for credit in the Latin American certificate program.

Comparative Politics: Middle East (CPO 4403) 3 credits
The course will explain the complex political process in the Middle East. Students will explore the historical background and current developments of the major sociopolitical trends.

Comparative Islamist Movements (CPO 4424) 3 credits
Examines the rise of the Islamist movements in Muslim countries with divergent historical, social and economic trajectories. Covers the origins and the rise of Islamist movements in Turkey, Jordan, Pakistan and Indonesia.

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Asia Pacific Rim Politics (CPO 4502) 3 credits
The comparative study of politics in Asia and Pacific Rim with emphasis on democratization, economic development, power and leadership.

Comparative Politics: Russia and Eastern Europe (CPO 4633) 3 credits
The comparative study of communist and post-communist regimes in countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union for advanced undergraduate students. Topics include the collapse of communism, the politics of transition and prospects for stability and democracy. Research project included.

Comparative Gender Politics (CPO 4710) 3 credits
Examines issues of gender with respect to political participation, policy making and women's rights in comparative and international perspective.

The Comparative Politics of Ethnic Conflict (CPO 4724) 3 credits
The objective of the course is to study the development of ethnic conflict, separatism, and identity issues, and their impact on world politics.

Special Topics (CPO 4932) 3 credits
Selected topics in political science.

Political Science Study Abroad (CPO 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Introduction to World Politics (INR 2002) 3 credits
Introduces language and forms of politics in a variety of social, economic and national contexts and provides the foundation for understanding the structure and dynamics of the international political system. This is a General Education course.

American Foreign Policy (INR 3102) 3 credits
An investigation of American foreign policy. The course is divided into three sections: 1) institutional framework; 2) post-WWII foreign policy; 3) post-cold war foreign policy.

International Law: Foundations and Institutions (INR 3403) 3 credits
Provides an in-depth review and analysis of the major jurisprudence and institutional features of modern international law and explores the relationship between the principal actors in world politics (nation-states, international organizations, substate actors) and prevailing international law. The manner by which international law is created, modified and applied is examined, along with the violation of international law and its consequences.

International Law of Peace and Diplomacy (INR 3413) 3 credits
Provides a general overview and detailed assessment of the laws that govern diplomatic relations among states and promote peace among nations. Students are introduced to the fields of human rights, diplomatic immunity, asylum, extradition, the law of the sea, air space law, outer space law, economic and environmental law.

International Law of Armed Conflict (INR 3433) 3 credits
Covers legal avenues for the avoidance of armed conflict, the laws that regulate the right to go to war and the laws that regulate soldiers in the field. Additionally, the history of efforts to hold individuals accountable for violating the laws of armed conflict is examined and analyzed.

International Organization (INR 3502) 3 credits
The course provides an overview of international organization in contemporary times with an emphasis on the United Nations system and its role in international affairs.

International Political Economy (INR 3702) 3 credits
Examination of the modern international political economy. The course addresses various theories that explain the relationship between politics and economics.

War and Peace (INR 4006) 3 credits
An examination of the causes of international behavior with special emphasis on conflict and cooperation.

The International System (INR 4081) 3 credits
An examination of trends and transformations in world politics including great-power politics, foreign policy decision-making, democratization, economic globalization, global inequalities, ethnonationalistic groups and terrorism, population dynamics, the ecology of world politics and sustainable development, international law, international organizations, international diplomacy, and the global predicament at the dawn of the new millennium.

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Global Environmental Politics and Policies (INR 4350) 3 credits
The study of global environmental politics includes a variety of issues, problems, politics and policies relevant to population growth, resource degradation and the impacts of human economic development. Examines the development of environmental governance, environmental justice movements and efforts to control consumption to enhance sustainability.

Advanced Diplomacy (INR 4503) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Provides students with essential skills, techniques and strategies to compete in national and international diplomatic competitions. FAU delegations are assigned countries; student delegates are assigned to committees with specific topics. After completing rigorous diplomatic training through simulations and compiling an extensive portfolio that includes country data and topic information, students travel to compete in either the National Model United Nations simulation in New York or the Midwest Model European Union in Indianapolis.

Special Topics (INR 4932) 3 credits
Selected topics in political theory.

University Honors Seminar in Political Science (POS 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in political science.

The Government of the U.S. (POS 2041) 3 credits
American political institutions and processes; the constitutional and legal framework of American government; the policy-making process; national-state-local relationships; political participation, elections and public control of government. This is a General Education course.

American State and Local Government (POS 2112) 3 credits
An introductory survey of subnational governments in the U.S. Focus is on intergovernmental relations, operations, and policy issues.

Introductory Topics in Political Science (POS 2934) 1-3 credits
In-depth analysis of current and emergent issues in government and politics. Topics vary from semester to semester.

Issues in American Politics (POS 3033) 3 credits
This course examines the critical issues facing the American political system and the ability of the system to resolve them.

Florida Politics and Government (POS 3182) 3 credits
Study of political process and forces which shape state government and policy in Florida. Emphasis on the impact of a changing political environment on policy and government structure.

Political Film and Fiction (POS 3258) 3 credits
An exploration of important political concepts, themes, and questions through the study of film and fiction.

Law and American Society (POS 3691) 3 credits
An introductory course examining the cultural foundations of law in American society, including historical and contemporary uses of law, violence, and the conflict between individual freedom and government power.

Women and the Law (POS 3693) 3 credits
The changing legal status of women and men in American society. Subjects include political rights, family law, employment and education policy, and the 5th, 14th and Equal Rights Amendments to the Constitution. (May be taken for credit in Women's Studies Program.)

Research Methods in Political Science (POS 3703) 3 credits
Introduction to the scope and methodology of political analysis. Includes introductory examinations of research design, survey research, computer applications, data analysis, and library research. (Course should be completed by the end of second semester of junior year.)

U.S. Immigration Policy (POS 4024) 3 credits

Pre or corequisite: POS 2041 with minimum grade of "C"
Examines issues related to immigration and American national identity, including immigration policy and politics.

Urban Politics (POS 4145) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
Political development and change in metropolitan areas. Problems of coordinating federal, state and urban policy making and of regional governance. Economic and social problems in metropolitan areas and policies for solving them.

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Public Opinion and American Politics (POS 4204) 3 credits
Prerequisite: POS 2041 with minimum grade of "C"
Political beliefs, values and attitudes of the American public; mass participation in public affairs; voting behavior; compliance and support for public policies. Linkages between the mass public and government in the United States.

Media in Politics (POS 4235) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
An examination of the relationship between politics and the media and the effect of this relationship in limiting, creating, and shaping political power.

Campaigns/Elections (POS 4275) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
This course focuses on how candidates for office conceive and implement their campaign strategies and what determines a campaign's success or failure.

Religion and American Politics (POS 4291) 3 credits
Pre or corequisite: POS 2041 with minimum grade of "C"
Examines the role of religion in American government and politics.

Honors Senior Seminar (POS 4304) 3 credits
Prerequisites: POS 2041, CPO 3003, POS 3703; Political Science Honors students only
Helps students writing honors theses in Political Science to develop, execute and defend an outstanding project. Satisfies a requirement for graduating with honors in Political Science.

The U.S. Presidency (POS 4413) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
Examination of historical and contemporary role of the presidency, including the presidential selection process and the office's evolution in status, powers, administrative responsibilities, leadership, and decision-making.

The U.S. Congress (POS 4424) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
Study of Congress and the behavior of its members. Emphasis upon the recruitment and election of legislators, institutional and informal rules, the committee system, and legislative procedures.

Political Parties and Interest Groups (POS 4453) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
The nature of political parties and interest groups and their impact on elections, public policy and political change.

Constitutional Law: Government Powers and Limits (POS 4603) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
This course examines the constitutional structure of U.S. government. It describes the separation of powers (the legal foundations and modern powers of the legislature, executive, judiciary and bureaucracy) and federalism (the powers of the national and state governments).

Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (POS 4604) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
This course examines American Civil Liberties and civil rights. It focuses upon Bill of Rights freedoms and the 14th Amendment.

The Judicial Process (POS 4609) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
The examination of the structural and behavioral components of justice in America. Topics to be covered include the role of law in society, the history and structure of American courts, and the processes of civil and criminal litigation.

Directed Independent Study (POS 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of department
Reading and research in a field of political science; a program to be approved in consultation with staff members.

Senior Research Project (POS 4910) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Completion of research project in the field of political science.

Special Topics (POS 4931) 1-3 credits
Selected topics in political science.

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Internship (POS 4941) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: permission of department
Student will work in a government office, agency or legislative office under supervision of a professor in the Political Science Department. Written paper required.

Masterworks in Political Theory (POT 4024) 3 credits
A review of major political thinkers from Plato to the present, stressing their contributions to an empirical understanding of political systems, to problems of political value, and their influence on current political ideas.

American Political Thought (POT 4204) 3 credits
A review of major themes in American political thought from the colonial period to the present and the effects of political ideas on political institutions and behavior.

Special Topics (POT 4932) 3 credits
Selected topics in political theory.

Women and Politics (PUP 3323) 3 credits
This course focuses on the role of women in politics and the effects of women's political involvement. Also considered are historical and contemporary barriers to women's political participation.

Policy Making and Administration (PUP 4004) 3 credits

Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
Policy making activities of public administrators, and intergovernmental cooperation and conflict in development and implementation of policies in the United States.

Policy Analysis (PUP 4008) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
Examines analytic methods for planning and evaluating public policies, and considers alternative strategies for developing and using information in administrative agencies.

Politics of Community Development (PUP 4623) 3 credits
Prerequisite or Corequisite: POS 2041
An investigation of the issues of urban poverty, public policies designed to address poverty, and forms of mobilization by poor people in urban places.

Government and the Economy (PUP 4710) 3 credits
Analyzes the relationship between the political and economic systems in the United States: the impact of politics on economics and the impact of economics on politics.

Political Science Graduate Courses

Seminar in Comparative Political Processes (CPO 6007) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
A study of political processes in modern states from a comparative perspective. Major literature in comparative method, systems analysis, political culture and personality, parties, elections, elites, and public policy will be covered.

Latin American Politics (CPO 6307) 3 credits
Designed to comprehensively explore and understand the politics of Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries. The main topics addressed during the course are conquest, colonization and independence; debt and development; democratization and democracy; U.S.-Latin American relations; revolution and revolutionaries and the current political state of Latin America.

Jihadism and Transnational Islamism (CPO 6405) 3 credits
Examination of the evolution of political Islam as a set of ideas. Investigation of Islamist movements and different models of Isalmic states. Course also explores the phenomenon of transnational Islamism and international jihadism against the backdrop of East-West relations and sociopolitical conditions in the Muslim world.

Middle East Politics (CPO 6407) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
This course will survey the main crises of the 20th century and will analyze current tensions. Special topics: Islam, Arab-Israeli peace, minorities, human rights, democratization.

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Comparative Ethnic Conflict (CPO 6723) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
The objective of this graduate seminar is to study the concept of ethnic conflict and its effects on world politics. The seminar will discuss theories of nationalism and a comprehensive number of case studies: Bosnia, Kosovo, Sudan, Lebanon, Nigeria, Chiappas, Arabs and Jews, the Kurds, etc.

Politics and Government of Post Communist States (CPO 6736)
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
Introduces students to the political, economic and social transformation of the post-communist Central and Eastern Europe and ex-USSR. Factors contributing to the relative success and failure of these developments are examined and placed in the comparative perspective.

Seminar in International Relations Theory (INR 6607) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
The purpose of this course is to survey the principal theoretical developments in international relations and develop an ability to deal critically with such developments.

Seminar in Administrative Policy Making (PAD 6035) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
An analysis of the role of bureaucrats in the policy process, with an emphasis on (1) intergovernmental policy relations among federal, state, and local units of government; and (2) legislative-executive- administrative policy relations at the national and state levels.

Seminar in Policy Implementation (PAD 6365) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
An examination of the political and bureaucratic setting in which public policies are implemented. There is an emphasis on political constraints on administrative agencies.

Seminar in American National Government (POS 6045) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
A description and analyses of American governmental institutions, policy-making processes, and contemporary policies within the context of political participation and power.

Seminar in Urban Politics (POS 6146) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
An analysis of problems and prospects of urban political change, urbanization and metropolitan development, regionalism, and community power structure.

Seminar in Political Behavior (POS 6208) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
A study in recent theory and research on mass political attitudes, participation and voting behavior, and the influence of the latter on political processes with a major emphasis on the United States.

Seminar in the Legislative Process (POS 6427) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
Study of legislative bodies: recruitment, composition, leadership, procedures, party and group roles, and theories of representation.

Seminar in Political Parties (POS 6447) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
A study of the composition, organization, structure, and functions of political parties and their roles in the political process. It discusses the relationship of parties to pressure groups.

Seminar in the Judicial Process (POS 6607) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
Examines and evaluates various elements of the American legal system, including the role of the law and courts in the political system, judicial behavior, and judicial policymaking.

Research Design in Political Science (POS 6736) 3 credits
Familiarizes students with the appropriate techniques and methods of research, inference and statistics in political science.

Readings in Political Science (POS 6904) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: permission of department
Selected readings in political science as preparation for taking the written comprehensive exam.

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Directed Independent Study (POS 6909) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of department
Involves reading and research in a field of political science. It is a program to be selected and approved in consultation with staff members.

Graduate Research Project (POS 6919) 3 credits
Grading: S/U

Special Topics (POS 6934) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study
Graduate-level study of a selected area in political science. Topics will vary.

Graduate Internship (POS 6942) 3-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of department
Internship for graduate students in political science. Each student will work in a public sector agency or community college under supervision of a professor in the Political Science Department. Grading: S/U

Master's Thesis (POS 6971) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of department
Grading: S/U

Issues in Public Policy (PUP 7058) 3 credits
Prerequisite: PAD 6035
A reading and research seminar on issues in U.S. public policy.

Sociology


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Sociological Theory (SYA 4010) 3 credits
An examination of the basic ideas of Classical and Modern Sociological thought.

Contemporary Social Theory (SYA 4120) 3 credits
Study of contemporary social theorists and schools of thought, interpretation of theoretical texts, and definition of purposes of social theory.

Social Conflict (SYA 4150) 3 credits
An analysis of conflict and conflict resolution and their sources in human society.

Sociological Analysis: A Survey of Methods (SYA 4300) 3 credits
Philosophy of social science, research design, measurement, sample selection and data gathering, analysis and interpretation.

Sociological Analysis: Qualitative and/or Comparative-Historical Methods (SYA 4310) 3 credits
This course focuses on qualitative and/or comparative-historical methods of social research. Specifically this course addresses issues involved in designing and conducting field and comparative-historical research, and explores techniques, including interviewing, participant observation, and archival research.

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Sociological Analysis: Quantitative Methods (SYA 4400) 3 credits
Design and execution of original research on social class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other issues central to contemporary sociology. Students explore various quantitative techniques using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and national survey and census data.

Writing Social Theory (SYA 4511) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A writing intensive course designed to use writing as a means of developing insights about sociological theory and about the social world.

Directed Independent Study (SYA 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of department

Special Topics (SYA 4930) 1-3 credits
An in-depth analysis of current social problems. Topics vary from semester to semester.

Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality (SYD 2790) 3 credits

Course examines race, class, gender, and sexuality and the inequalities associated with those areas. Course continues with examining how individuals are affected by race, class, gender, and sexuality and how the inequalities shape and are shaped by social institutions, including culture, media, education, the economy, and family. This is a General Education course.

Environmental Sociology (SYD 4510) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 3 credits of lower-division social science
Course describes a framework for understanding how the political, economic, and ideological structures of society contribute to environmental degradation.

Justice, Health, and the Environment (SYD 4513) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or substitute or equivalent
with grades of "C" or better
Through the lens of environmental sociology, this course examines how environmental contamination, natural resource use, and environmental health burden are distributed unequally due to one's race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and/or global position.

The Urban Community (SYD 4602) 3 credits
Comparative study of the development and consequences of urban community life. Emphasis on collective action and urbanism as a way of life.

Caribbean Inequalities (SYD 4631) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Course explores intersecting forms of social inequalities in the Caribbean and the global and historical conditions that frame them.

Race and Ethnic Relations (SYD 4700) 3 credits
A survey of the sociohistorical perspective in the area of intergroup relations; the role of minorities in contemporary society. Emphasis placed on cross-cultural comparisons.

Race in Global Context (SYD 4702) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 3 credits of lower-division social science
Examination of race and ethnic relations from a contemporary global perspective. Three broad questions are explored: What does "race" mean? How do global processes and local contexts produce the meaning of race? In what ways has globalization changed the use of race classifications?

Gender and Society (SYD 4800) 3 credits
Examines the social construction of masculinity and femininity, relationships between men and women, structure of gender stratification.

Women, Wealth and Power (SYD 4812) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Lower-division Sociology course with minimum grade of "C"
Explores connections between gender, class and race among wealthy women. Gender mitigates their actions and is embedded in household arrangements and other institutions. By studying these women, students learn about the tenacity of gender proscriptions and the strategies employed to assert agency and independence.

Gender, Power and Relationships (SYD 4814) 3 credits
Analysis of the relationship between gender norms in American society and patterns of interaction in everyday settings and intimate relationships. Particular focus on hierarchical interpersonal dynamics.

Sociological Perspectives (SYG 1000) 3 credits
Examines the major principles, concepts, theories, and methods of sociology. This is a General Education course.

University Honors Seminar in Sociology (SYG 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in sociology.

Social Problems (SYG 2010) 3 credits
This is an introductory course focused on the theory and research related to social problems. Some of the topics covered in the course include class, race, and sexual inequality, the political economy of social problems and deviant behavior. This is a General Education course.

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Sociology Study Abroad (SYG 2952) 1-4 credits

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Sociology of Food (SYG 4244) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SYG 1000 or SYG 2010 or permission of instructor
Study of the interplay between individual food choices and larger social, cultural, economic, and political forces restructuring the global food system.

Sociology Study Abroad (SYG 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Family and Society (SYO 4100) 3 credits
Study of the institutional character of the family, its historical development and relationship to other institutions, and the internal dynamics of family life.

Sociology of Religion (SYO 4200) 3 credits
An introduction to religion as a sociological phenomenon, including the social conditions under which organized and folk religion arises, the role of religious beliefs and practices in social life, the interrelationship of religion and other primary identities (race and ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality), civil religion, secularization, and the impact of religion on other social institutions. Special emphasis is placed on the diversity of religious traditions in South Florida.

Sociology of Education (SYO 4250) 3 credits
An examination of the application of sociological theories and research to the educational institution. Focuses on the relationship of education to the social structure in agricultural and industrialized societies, the study of schools as complex social organizations, and the role of education in the stratification system.

Sociology of the Marketplace (SYO 4353) 3 credits
This course introduces students to economic sociology (understood as the application of sociological methods to the four "moments" of economic life: production, distribution, exchange, and consumption). The course emphasizes the "embeddedness" of economic action and the social construction of economic institutions.

Men, Women, and Work (SYO 4370) 3 credits
How work in our society is organized, what work means to people, how it affects their lives. How people get into various occupations, and their varying roles, careers, and interactions. Special emphasis on differences in occupational experiences for women and men.

Labor and Globalization (SYO 4377) 3 credits
Prerequisites: SYD 2790 or SYG 1000 or SYG 2010 or SYP 2450
Exposes undergraduate students to the substantive debates in the sociological literature on globalization and the fate of labor movements, drawing from a world-historical approach that helps elucidate global as well as local patterns of labor movement activity.

Health and Social Inequality (SYO 4404) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 3 credits of lower-division social science
A sociological understanding of why some people live longer than others and why their quality of life may be better than others. Explanatory structures for these outcomes include socioeconomic status, race and ethnicity, and gender.

Sociology of Mental Health (SYO 4410) 3 credits
This course focuses on the role of social and cultural factors in shaping, mental health. It also critically examines the social, cultural, and political meanings of mental health care, popular psychology, and various forms of psychological discourse, particularly in the United States context.

Class, Status, and Power (SYO 4530) 3 credits
A comparative analysis of the causes and consequences of social inequality. Concentration on the individual and societal effects of differential access to power and privilege in plural societies.

Poverty and Society (SYO 4534) 3 credits
Analyzes the historical, social, political, and economic contexts of poverty and focuses on the relationship between poverty and gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Course also considers theoretical and empirical explanations for poverty and evaluates policy and program options to combat poverty.

Organizational Sociology (SYO 4570) 3 credits
Theories of the emergence, growth, structure and behavior of formal organizations; organizations and their members; organizations relationship to society.

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Global Society (SYP 2450) 3 credits
This course examines two permanent features of historical capitalism: uneven distribution of wealth and power on a global scale and periodic economic and social crises. It aims to situate globalization in relation to the long-term trajectory of capitalism. This is General Education course.

Human Sexuality and Social Change (SYP 3060) 3 credits

Sociological and social psychological examination of varieties of human sexual behavior and how changing sexual attitudes and behavior are connected to social and individual processes.

Drugs and Society (SYP 3550) 3 credits
This course examines drug use from both a social psychological and sociological perspective. Within the former, questions of attraction and involvement are considered. Within the latter, the control (and justification for control) of licit and illicit drugs is discussed.

Sociology of Aging and Dying (SYP 3740) 3 credits
Examination of demographic factors, cultural values and norms, institutional structures and social psychological processes relevant to death, dying and aging.

Sociology of Happiness (SYP 4014) 3 credits
Prerequisite: SYG 1000 or SYG 2010 with grade of "C," or permission of instructor
Addresses classical and contemporary sociologists' views of what happiness is, what promotes it and what limits it. Also considered are current national and cross-national social movements aiming to increase happiness.

Self and Society (SYP 4110) 3 credits
Study of thought, emotions, the self, and social interaction in societal context. Particularly, the course will focus on the impact of the 20th-century social changes, cultural patterns, and structures of social inequality in American society.

Social Movements (SYP 4304) 3 credits
This course explores how forms of social protest may create social change. Through careful analysis of major social movements such as civil rights, labor, feminist/women's, ecological/environmental movements, and others, the course explores why and how social movements emerge, decline, and change social institutions and relationships.

Social Change (SYP 4400) 3 credits
A consideration of selected works of classic and contemporary theorists, emphasizing their implications for the study of social change. May include such topics as modernization, social movements, revolution and post-industrial society.

Sociology of Consumption (SYP 4420) 3 credits
This course examines consumption and consumerism from a sociological perspective. It focuses on the social, economic, political, cultural, and personal meanings and implications of consumption and consumerism in contemporary capitalist societies.

Technology and Society (SYP 4421) 3 credits
Psychological, sociological and economic aspects of technological developments on social life, with a primary emphasis on the impact of computing.

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Globalization and U.S. Cities (SYP 4451) 3 credits

Course focuses on understanding the relationship of the city and urban phenomena to global economic processes. Students are introduced to several traditional sociological theories of urban development. Course also considers gender and race dynamics in urban and global contexts.

Global Social Change (SYP 4453) 3 credits
This course explores the structure-agency problem in the age of globalization. Students learn to use the fundamental tools of global analysis to analyze recent changes in the world economy and the interstate system.

Globalization and Social Movements (SYP 4454) 3 credits
This course explores the relationship between social movements and globalization and focuses on social movements in different national and historical contexts.

Adolescence and Delinquency (SYP 4530) 3 credits
An analysis of sociological issues in defining delinquency in changing society; the nature of adolescence; current theories of delinquent behavior; modes of social control applied to juvenile delinquency.

Social Control and Deviance (SYP 4570) 3 credits
Study of social institutions and processes promoting conformity and deviance. Emphasis on deviant behavior and societal responses to it.

Cultural Sociology (SYP 4610) 3 credits
Prerequisites: 3 credits of lower-level social science or permission of instructor
An exploration of sociological theories and methods pertinent to the study of culture. Course analyzes contemporary American culture, in particular the cultural and political divide over issues related to religion, science, family, and sexuality.

Sociology of Popular Culture (SYP 4630) 3 credits
Examination of different forms of popular culture ranging from art, music, literature, fashion, and the mass media from a sociological perspective.

The Sociology of Sport (SYP 4650) 3 credits
An introduction to the description, explanation and interrelations between sport and other societal components. Primary focus is on the interplay of sport activity with socially significant values and how this reinforces prevalent sentiments, perspectives and behavior.

Sociology of Youth (SYP 4714) 3 credits
An examination of how young people's lives are shaped by social forces such as media, schooling, and peer culture. Course traces history of how youth have made an impact on their society, especially through music, subcultures and student movements.

Sociology Graduate Courses

Seminar: Critical Perspectives in Social Theory (SYA 6117) 3 credits
Through in-depth reading of original texts, social histories, and/or novels/literary works, this seminar critically evaluates the assumptions, concepts, methods and explanations in classical and/or contemporary social theory and examines their relevance for the present time.

Seminar in Contemporary Social Theory (SYA 6126) 3 credits
Study of selected works of significant contemporary social theorists and core issues in contemporary social thought.

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Seminar in Advanced Research Methods (SYA 6305) 3 credits
An advanced overview of research methods in current use in sociology, with a strong emphasis on quantitative analysis of social survey data. Major topics include inferences of testable propositions from theory, operationalization of key theoretical concepts, model building and assessment, and communication of outcomes.

Seminar in Advanced Qualitative Methods (SYA 6315) 3 credits
An advanced overview of the most common types of qualitative research methods in sociology, including both theoretical considerations and fieldwork. An independent research project will be required.

Directed Independent Study (SYA 6909) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading and research in a field of sociology, a program to be selected and approved in consultation with the instructor.

Master's Thesis (SYA 6971) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy
Grading: S/U

Seminar in Urbanization (SYD 6426) 3 credits
An analysis of historical and contemporary urbanization as related to the forms and functions of the city. Selected theories of social change are employed in examining this process.

Seminar in Global Environmental Perspectives (SYD 6517) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Sociology graduate students only or permission of instructor
Examines the connections between society and the environment and between local experiences and global dynamics. Global environmental perspectives, disputes, politics and movements will be analyzed.

Seminar in Race and Ethnic Relations (SYD 6705) 3 credits
A historical and comparative examination of the origin and nature of racial and ethnic differences as they manifest themselves in human societies.

Special Topics (SYD 6934) 1-3 credits
Study of a selected area in sociology. Topics will vary.

Seminar in the Sociology of Religion (SYO 6205) 3 credits
A seminar in the sociology of religion, including sociological theories of religion, sects, cults, parareligious groups, civil religion, secularization and fundamentalism, and the impact of race, class, and gender on religious practice.

Seminar: State, Economy and Society (SYO 6335) 3 credits
Course examines the limits of disciplinary approaches to the study of state/society/economy and analyzes the interweaving relations of state, economy, and society from comparative and historical perspectives. Readings include theoretical texts, analytical applications, social histories, and literary works.

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Seminar in Class, Status, and Power (SYO 6535) 3 credits
A critical analysis of theory and research pertaining to the causes and consequences of structured social inequality.

Seminar in Microsociology (SYP 6035) 3 credits
Sociological study of self and identity, thoughts and emotions, social interaction, intimate relationships, micro-level dimensions of social control and social power, and other selected topics in sociological social psychology.

Seminar in Social Control and Deviance (SYP 6505) 3 credits
Research and theorizing about the social construction of normalcy and deviance, as well as changes and variability in sites of social control. Considers issues in the sociology of deviant behavior, with particular emphasis on its connection to systems of social inequality.

Theatre and Dance Courses
(Listed following the Women's Studies courses, under School of the Arts, Theatre and Dance)

Women's Studies

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Required Courses (choice of one)

Introduction to Women's Studies (WST 2010) 3 credits
Multidisciplinary study of the heritage of women and the nature of gender-related problems in contemporary societies, stressing cultural images of women, socialization by gender, women's history, feminist methods of analysis. May be considered either an Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Introduction to Sexuality and Gender Studies (WST 2608) 3 credits
Discussions include the meanings of masculinity, femininity, lesbian, gay, heterosexual, and transgenderism as these are understood culturally and politically.

Feminist Perspectives on Gender (WST 3315) 3 credits
Course is an introduction to the study of women, feminism, and the representation of gender in Western culture. Students gain insight into the ways in which paradigms of gender are defined and work to shape cultural mores, ideologies, and discourses on theoretical and practical levels.

Sex and Gender in American Culture (WST 3640) 3 credits
Understanding gender definitions and diseases, theoretically and as these are layered into culture, is an essential component of Women's Studies.

Core Courses

History of U.S. Women (AMH 3560) 3 credits
(See History courses, this section)

Gender and Culture (ANT 4302) 3 credits
(See Anthropology courses, this section)

Women and Criminal Justice (CCJ 4670) 3 credits
(See Criminology and Criminal Justice courses, College for Design and Social Inquiry section)

Communication, Gender, and Language (COM 3014) 3 credits
(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Comparative Gender Politics (CPO 4710) 3 credits
(See Political Science courses, this section)

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Women and Film (FIL 4056) 3 credits
(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Women in Literature (LIT 4383) 3 credits
(See English courses, this section)

Women, Witches, and Healing (NUR 4176) 3 credits
(See Nursing courses, College of Nursing section)

Feminist Philosophy (PHM 3123) 3 credits
(See Philosophy courses, this section)

Women and the Law (POS 3693) 3 credits
(See Political Science courses, this section)

Psychology of Women (SOP 3742) 3 credits
(See Psychology courses, College of Science section)

Issues in Counseling Women (SOW 4357) 3 credits
(See Social Work courses, College for Design and Social Inquiry section)

Gender, Race and Communication (SPC 4712) 3 credits
(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Gender and Society (SYD 4800) 3 credits
Family and Society (SYO 4100) 3 credits
Men, Women and Work (SYO 4370) 3 credits
Poverty and Society (SYO 4534) 3 credits

(See Sociology courses, this section)

Women of the Third World (WST 2101) 3 credits
Introduction to women's issues in a global context. Course analyzes constructions of third world women as "other" and discuss how these concepts perpetuate global power dynamics.

Women, Gender and Sexuality in the Era of Globalization (WST 2102) 3 credits
Explores the nature of women, gender and sexuality from a global perspective, drawing from the foundational principles of various disciplines to analyze the historical, economic, political and cultural trends that have shaped the construction of women, gender and sexuality around the world.

Sex, Myth, Power, and Popular Culture (WST 3305) 3 credits
Examines varying images of women of power in popular culture—film, television, song, ads—as mothers, monsters, femme fatales, amazons, witches, and goddesses. These stories and images are interpreted based on ancient myths and beliefs.

Women, Violence, Resistance (WST 3325) 3 credits
An examination of violence against women, including rape, prostitution, pornography, harassment, incest, battering, and sexual murder. Class texts and materials include political theory and analysis, first-person accounts, novels, poetry, and popular culture items.

Special Topics (WST 3930) 1-3 credits
Study of a particular issue, theme, or aspect of interdisciplinary Women's Studies. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Sex, Violence, and Hollywood (WST 4337) 3 credits
The class examines why sex and violence are the two main ingredients of Hollywood cinema and how the two interact to create meanings.

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Green Consciousness (WST 4349) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
This class explores emerging green or environmental consciousness in various cultural venues (theory/activism, spirituality, philosophy, literature, art, and popular culture).

Women of Color in U.S. Society (WST 4404) 3 credits
Examines how issues of gender, race, ethnicity, and class shape experiences of women of color in the U.S., including Native-American, African-American, Asian-American, and Hispanic-American women.

Gender, Culture, and Social Change in Africa: A Case Study of Ghana (WST 4417) 3 credits
This study abroad course provides students the opportunity to explore, from a cross-cultural perspective, trends and dynamics of Africa's social, political, economic, and cultural systems as they impact gender and women's lives.

Special Topics (WST 4930) 1-3 credits
Intensive study at an advanced level of a particular issue, theme, or aspect of interdisciplinary Women's Studies. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Directed Independent Study (WST 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and Women's Studies Director
Independent reading and research in interdisciplinary Women's Studies. Each program of study is arranged in consultation with a Women's Studies faculty member during the term prior to taking this course.

Elective Courses

Class, Gender, and Race in the American Community since 1900 (AMH 4318) 3 credits
(See History courses, this section)

Victimology (CCJ 3666) 3 credits
(See Criminology and Criminal Justice courses, College for Design and Social Inquiry section)

American Multicultural Discourse (SPC 3704) 3 credits
Intercultural Communication (SPC 3710) 3 credits
Rhetoric of Social Protest (SPC 4633) 3 credits

(See School of Communication and Multimedia Studies courses, this section)

Human Sexuality and Social Change (SYP 3060) 3 credits
(See Sociology courses, this section)

Women's Studies Graduate Courses

Women, War and Peace Building (WST 6185) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Bachelor of Arts degree or permission of instructor
Examines the gendered nature of armed conflicts in civil and across international spaces with emphasis on distinctive ways in which women and girls are affected and respond. Attention is given to the role of states, civil society and historical processes, such as colonialism and globalization, in perpetuating conflict.

Women, Myth, and Reality (WST 6306) 3 credits

Course focuses on types of power relations, beliefs, and definitions associated with patriarchal consciousness, particularly those concerning women and gender that have been conveyed in religion, science, art, philosophy, literature, and popular culture.

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Women, Violence, Resistance (WST 6327) 3 credits
Prerequisite: B.A. degree or permission of instructor
Course considers rape, violence, incest, battery, and murder of women as a form of social control. Topics include cultural constructions of sexuality and gender, popular cultural representations, and women's and men's resistance to sexual violence.

Sex, Violence in Hollywood (WST 6339) 3 credits
This course examines why sex and violence are the two main ingredients of Hollywood cinema and how the two interact to create meanings.

Women, Environment, Ecofeminism, Environmental Justice (WST 6348) 3 credits
This course examines the history and evolution of ecofeminist and environmental justice, thought, and practice through its major womanist/feminist activists, theorists, and core issues.

Women of Color in the U.S. (WST 6405) 3 credits
Examines how issues of gender, race, ethnicity, and class shape the lives of women of color in the U.S., such as Native-American, African-American, Latin-American, and Asian-American women.

Feminist Theory and Praxis (WST 6564) 3 credits
Survey of major statements in modern and contemporary feminist theory, with attention to their application in fields that may include the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, as well as national and global activism.

Gender, Health and Power (WST 6615) 3 credits
This course assesses the role of power relations, particularly gender, ethnicity, social class, religion, and globalization in shaping the health status, the illness experiences and outcomes, and the form and substance of medical options available in local communities around the world. A focus on how health is differentially impacted for women and men will engender an examination of gender ideology in power relations.

Directed Independent Study (WST 6909) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of Women's Studies Director
Reading and research in Women's Studies interdisciplinary topics.

Special Topics (WST 6934) 3 credits
Reading and Research in interdisciplinary women's studies topics.

Seminar in Global Perspectives on Gender (WST 6936) 3 credits
Interdisciplinary study of gender issues and the intersection with race and class in world regions.

Feminization of Poverty (WST 6938) 3 credits
Prerequisite: B.A. degree or permission of instructor
Course examines issues pertaining to the feminization of poverty from a feminist and comparative perspective. Discussions will apply theoretical, historical, and empirical frameworks to analyze the gender dimensions of poverty and ways in which these frameworks structure our understanding of the feminization of poverty.

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Graduate Internship in Women's Studies (WST 6941) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy
Internship with agency or office pertaining to women's studies. Grading: S/U

Master's Thesis (WST 6971) 1-6 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy
Grading: S/U


School of the Arts

The School of the Arts includes course offerings in Music, Theatre and Dance, and Visual Arts and Art History.

Music

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Music Composition Class (MUC 2211) 2 credits
Prerequisites: MUT 1111, permission of instructor
Class instruction in music composition. Course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Introduction to Songwriting (MUC 2601) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MUT 2117, MUT 2247, and one semester of music composition
Songwriting techniques studies through analysis and construction techniques. Students will assess different commercial genres and learn how to apply various techniques to their own songwriting. Emphasis will be placed on creation of lyrics, harmony, melodies, hooks, and forms.

Applied Music Composition (MUC 4231) 1-2 credits
Prerequisites: MUC 2211, MUT 4311 and/or permission of instructor
Applied lessons in music composition. Students compose original works in a variety of media and styles. Course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Composition (MUC 4241) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Original works for solo and small ensembles. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Composing and Arranging Music for Television and Radio Commercials
(MUC 4600) 3 credits

Prerequisite: MUT 2117 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisite: MUS 4343

This course is designed to teach the basic composing, arranging, and technical techniques required to score music for commercials and jingles.

Music Composition for Film (MUC 4610) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2117, MUT 2341, permission of instructor
Film composition is designed to teach the basic composing, arranging, and technical techniques required to score films and television.

Introduction to Music Education (MUE 2040) 2 credits
Designed as an introduction to MUE 4140, Choral Methods, and MUE 4330, Secondary Instrumental Methods, this course explores the field of music education. A 15-hour observation component is required.

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Voice Techniques (MUE 2430) 1 credit
This course is designed for music students in the music education or vocal tracks who are working with the singing voice. It addresses vocal physiology, health and preservation, techniques, and pedagogy/methodology.

Woodwind Pedagogy and Methods (MUE 2450) 1 credit
Methods and materials used in teaching woodwind instruments on the elementary and secondary school level.

Brass Pedagogy and Methods (MUE 2460) 1 credit
Methods and materials used in teaching brass instruments on the elementary and secondary school level.

Percussion Pedagogy and Methods (MUE 2470) 1 credit
Methods and materials used in teaching percussion instruments on the elementary and secondary school level.

Music: Elementary School 1 (MUE 4013) 2 credits
Not open to Music majors. See Department of Teaching and Learning for course description.

Music: Elementary School 2 (MUE 4311) 2 credits
Problems of teaching and supervising music in the elementary school for students majoring in music and music education. Lesson planning and teaching situations are presented in class. Leading music series are studied. Open to Music majors only.

Choral Methods (MUE 4140) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUE 2040
Methods and materials of teaching choral singing on the elementary and secondary school level.

Secondary Instrumental Methods (MUE 4330) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUE 2040
Practical experience in teaching singing, instrumental, rhythmic, listening, and creative activities in music to secondary school students. Study and evaluation of new materials and methods of teaching secondary school music.

String Pedagogy and Methods (MUE 4441) 1 credit
Methods and materials used in teaching string instruments on the elementary and secondary school level.

Marching Band Pedagogy and Methods (MUE 4480) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUE 2040 and MUT 2116 with grades of "C" or better
Students learn to prepare for, administer and rehearse a comprehensive marching band program at the secondary school level.

Jazz Ensemble Pedagogy and Methods (MUE 4481) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUT 2116 with grade of "C" or better
Students learn to prepare for, administer and rehearse jazz bands at the secondary school level.

Field Experience Seminar (MUE 4946) 1 credit
Course prepares students for participation in the academic year portion of the School of the Arts program funded through a grant from the Pew Educational Trust.

Choral Conducting 1 (MUG 3201) 1 credit
Prerequisites: MUH 4211 and MUT 4311 with grades of "C" or better
Corequisite: MUT 4311 with a grade of "C" or better
The basic techniques of choral conducting and an introduction to choral literature.

Instrumental Conducting 1 (MUG 3301) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUT 4311 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisite: MUT 4311 with a grade of "C" or higher
Introduction to the basic techniques of instrumental conducting and to the appropriate literature.

Choral Conducting 2 (MUG 4201) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUG 3201, MUH 4212, MUT 4311 with grades of "C" or better
Theory and practice of choral conducting.

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Instrumental Conducting 2 (MUG 4301) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUG 3301 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisite: 15 hours of observation or ensemble participation

Theory and practice of conducting instrumental ensembles.

Advanced Instrumental Conducting (MUG 4302) 1 credit

Prerequisites: MUG 4301 with a grade of "C" or better and permission of instructor
Continues the rigorous course of professional development for the future instrumental music educator/conductor. Students completing this course will be prepared to successfully conduct secondary school concert ensembles. May be repeated for credit.

Applied Orchestral Conducting (MUG 4303) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: MUG 4301 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisite: Students must perform as a member of the FAU Orchestra or observe all
rehearsals

An advanced, in-depth study of standard orchestral repertoire in a wide variety of styles and periods as well as the study of the conducting and rehearsal techniques needed for the artistic realization of performance through applied lessons. This course may be repeated for credit.

History and Appreciation of Rock (MUH 2017) 3 credits
A study of the origins and development of Rock and Roll music from Rhythm and Blues and Country and Western to current trends in Pop and Rock. Aural recognition of representative recordings will be required.

History and Appreciation of Jazz (MUH 2018) 3 credits
The history of Jazz music from its origin to the present time.

American Popular Music and Culture (MUH 2520) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUS 2101
The purpose of this course is to explore complex interrelations of American popular music styles utilizing four lines of inquiry: 1) those qualities that most clearly define a style; 2) the interaction among styles and the influence of one style on another; 3) the transformation of the commercially dominant style over the history of American popular music; 4) the stylistic evolution of genres within a specific time span. No prior musical training is required for the course.

Rock & Roll in American Society (MUH 3023) 3 credits
This survey course brings into focus the roots and historical perspective of Rock & Roll in American society. Musical and historical events and their effect on the development and evolution of Rock & Roll music from its inception to the present day are explored.

World Music Survey (MUH 3056) 3 credits
An upper-division elective for non-majors, this course surveys and explores representative examples of non--Western music and culture from North and South America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania through lectures, listening, discussion, outside reading, and hands-on experience.

Music Cultures of the World (MUH 3514) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUS 2101
Survey of the rich diversity of world music with emphasis on the relationship between music and culture on a global level. Music traditions from Asia, Africa, North and South America, Oceania, and Europe are explored through lectures, discussion, listening, assigned reading, participatory exercises, musical analysis, and study of music in cultural context.

Jazz in American Society (MUH 3801) 3 credits
This survey course brings into focus the roots and historical perspective of Jazz in American society. Musical and historical events and their effect on the development and evolution of Jazz music from its inception to the present day are explored.

Music of Western Civilization 1 (MUH 4211) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2116 with minimum grade of "C"
Survey of Western history music from Antiquity through the Baroque Era, designed for Music majors. Develops familiarity with specific works and general musical styles through intensive listening exercises. Provides an understanding of performance, composition and theoretical innovations in vocal and instrumental music through musical analysis. Explores the philosophical/aesthetic basis of the creative process by significant composers.

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Music of Western Civilization 2 (MUH 4212) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2117 with minimum grade of "C"
Survey of Western history music from the Classical Period through the Romantic Period, designed for Music majors. Develops familiarity with specific works and general musical styles through intensive listening exercises. Provides an understanding of performance, composition and theoretical innovations in vocal and instrumental music through musical analysis. Explores the philosophical/aesthetic basis of the creative process by significant composers.

Music of Western Civilization 3 (MUH 4371) 2 credits
Prerequisites: MUH 4212 and MUT 2117 with grades of "C" or better; Music and Music Education majors only
A survey course designed for music majors with a focus on the history and theoretical developments in Western music from the 20th Century.

Russian Music, Art, and Culture of the 19th Century (MUH 4551) 3 credits
A study of great Russian composers, performers of the 19th century, and their contemporaries in the fine arts. Lectures supplemented with CDs , videos, and slides.

Russian Music, Art, and Culture of the 20th Century (MUH 4552) 3 credits
A study of great Russian composers, performers of the 20th century, and their contemporaries in the fine arts. Lectures supplemented with CDs, videos, and slides.

Music in Film (MUH 4623) 3 credits
Music in film is a history of the use of music in films, covering 1895 to present. The composer's art and evolution with technologically different decades is discussed, as well as transition from silent to sound.

Special Topics in Music History (MUH 4930) 3 credits
Corequisite or prerequisite: MUH 4211 or 4212
In-depth study of selected aspects of music history and literature. Specific topic to be announced in advance of each semester.

History and Appreciation of Music (MUL 2010) 3 credits
Meets the core curriculum requirement in music for non-music majors. This is a General Education course.

History and Literature of Musical Theatre (MUL 3015) 3 credits
Students study the development of the musical theatre genre from the beginnings as a uniquely American genre through the modern day. Study includes the history, development, and significant works in and of the genre.

Classical Guitar Literature (MUL 3430) 2 credits
Survey of classical guitar concert and solo literature, chamber music, works for voice and guitar, and concertos.

Chamber Music Literature 1 (MUL 3561) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all requirements for MVK 2421, Applied Piano for Performance Majors, or permission of the instructor
A study of chamber music literature for piano with emphasis upon works for one piano-four hands and sonata and/or solo literature for piano and various other instruments. Required for all Chamber Music/Accompanying majors.

Chamber Music Literature 2 (MUL 3562) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUL 3561 with a grade of "C" or higher
A study of chamber music literature for piano with emphasis upon works for piano trio, quartet, and quintet from the 18th through the 20th century. Required for all Chamber Music/Accompanying majors.

Jazz/Pop Literature (MUL 4383) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Ability to read lead sheets (music with melody and chord symbols)
A study of standard Jazz, Popular, Rock and Country music literature through classroom performance with voice or instrument.

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Piano Literature 1 (MUL 4400) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUH 4212 or permission of instructor
A study of music literature for the piano from the Baroque through the Classical periods. Required of all Classical Piano Performance majors.

Piano Literature 2 (MUL 4401) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUH 4212 or permission of instructor
A study of music literature for the piano from the Romantic through the 20th century. Required of all Classical Piano Performance majors.

Solo String Literature (MUL 4433) 2 credits
A survey of major solo literature for bowed string instruments.

Survey of Wind and Percussion Solo Literature (MUL 4450) 2 credits
Course includes listening, analysis, and grading of wind and percussion solo literature from the Baroque period to the present.

Survey of Wind and Percussion Chamber Literature (MUL 4451) 2 credits
Course includes listening, analysis, and grading of wind and percussion chamber literature from the Baroque period to the present.

Survey of Orchestra Literature (MUL 4500) 3 credits
This course provides a survey of orchestral literature from the Baroque through the 20th century, focusing on innovations, changing roles of orchestral instruments, performance style and techniques, and interpretative philosophies.

Wind Instrument Literature (MUL 4550) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MUG 3301
A study of wind instrumental literature and history from the late Baroque through the 20th century.

Survey of Vocal Solo Literature (MUL 4602) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MUH 4211 and MUH 4212 with grades of "C" or higher
A survey of vocal solo literature covering the art song, opera, oratorio, and cantata from the 1600 to the present.

Survey of Choral Music Literature (MUL 4643) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Three semesters Music History, Music Theory through Form and Analysis
A survey of choral music history and literature from the Renaissance to the present.

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Introduction to the Music Business (MUM 3301) 3 credits
An introduction to the history, principles, and practices of the music industry. Topics will include recording, publishing, copyrights, licensing, promotion and arts management, music and instrument merchandising, contracts, and music in mass communication.

Legal Issues for the Musician (MUM 3303) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
In-depth study of the legal aspects of the music business, including contract writing, copyright, royalties, performance rights organizations and licensing. Emphasis on practical experiences.

Sound Recording 1 (MUM 3663) 3 credits
Course presents the basics of audio engineering and recording techniques in an interactive environment.

Music Publishing and Copyright (MUM 4304) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Designed to teach students the basics of music copyright laws and the field of music publishing.

Live Sound Reinforcement (MUM 4628) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
To teach students the basics of audio engineering and live sound reinforcement in an interactive environment. Students work together in a collaborative effort to learn the processes and skills necessary to engineer live performances of music, theater, and public announcements.

Sound Recording 2 (MUM 4664) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUM 3663
In-depth application of advanced principles of audio recording and mixing.

Music Production (MUM 4723) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2117, permission of instructor
Corequisite: MUS 4343

The study of the artistic and technical skills necessary to be a music producer, with a focus on record production.

Artist Management (MUM 4724) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Covers important aspects of the art and practice of touring, booking, management, promotion and marketing of creative artists. It involves managing the venues, contracts, multi-media promotions, professional agents and attorneys.

Music Marketing and Public Relations (MUM 4732) 2 credits
Students will explore marketing, promotion, and public relations techniques employed to promote sales of recorded music and other commercial development of musical artists.

University Marching Band (MUN 1110) 1-3 credits
The Florida Atlantic University Marching Band is designed to promote the advancement of the University through entertainment, artistic performances, and school spirit, while enhancing the collegiate, life-building experience of FAU students.

Brazilian Percussion Ensemble (MUN 2820) 1 credit

Course provides a hands-on large ensemble performance experience with the rhythms, instruments, and performance practices of batucada, a highly rhythmic genre associated with samba and the annual pre-Lenten Carnaval celebration in Brazil. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits. Open to all majors by audition.

World Music Ensemble (MUN 3494) 1 credit
The World Music Ensemble is a performance-oriented addendum to the Music Cultures of the World and World Music Survey courses, providing hands-on experience learning and performing a rotating variety of select world music traditions from Africa, the Americas, and Asia. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Commercial Music Ensemble (MUN 4015) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
This ensemble provides students with the tools and experience necessary to excel as studio and performing musicians in the commercial music world. Students analyze, study, arrange, and perform a variety of commercial music styles, including, but not limited to, rock, pop, jazz, funk, alternative, country, soul, R & B, Latin, and world music. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

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Pep Band (MUN 4103) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Pep Band is designed to promote the advancement of the University through entertainment, artistic performance, and school spirit while enhancing the collegiate, life-building experience of the membership. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

University Marching Band (MUN 4113) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
The FAU Marching Band is open to all regularly enrolled University students after clearing entry with the Director of Bands. The University Band will read and perform literature on the field and in the stands at home football games and selected away games and at pep rallies, ranging from arrangements of light classics to pop and rock. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 24 credits.

University Symphony Band (MUN 4133) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Symphony Band provides member musicians with an environment in which personal artistic growth may occur through the performance of quality music for winds. Members collaborate with other dedicated musicians in an effort to foster personal musicianship in an ensemble environment while producing performances that are both well-prepared and presented in an artistic manner. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Chamber Winds (MUN 4144) 1 credit
The performance of advanced chamber wind music from the 16th through the 20th centuries by a chamber ensemble of ten to 16 wind instrumentalists. Open by audition. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

University Symphony Orchestra (MUN 4213) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Symphony Orchestra is dedicated to performing standard repertoire in a wide variety of styles and periods at the highest level of musicianship. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

University Chorus (MUN 4313) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Previous experience or permission of instructor
To experience a high level of choral music education and performance of standard choral literature 14th-20th centuries through the opportunities available in rehearsals, concerts, and all other choral-oriented activities. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Women's Chorus (MUN 4323) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
A vocal ensemble comprised of female voices performing a wide repertoire of choral literature for the female voice. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Men's Chorus (MUN 4333) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
A choral ensemble of male voices performing a wide repertoire of choral literature written for men's voices. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Chamber Singers (MUN 4343) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
A choral ensemble of mixed voices performing a wide repertoire of chamber choral literature. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Chamber Vocal Ensemble (MUN 4344) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
A survey of vocal music for small ensembles of all periods of music with a view to performance. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

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University Wind Ensemble (MUN 4423) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Ensemble provides the member musicians with a rich musical experience through the performance of quality music for winds. Open to students by audition. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Concert Percussion Ensemble (MUN 4443) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Concert Percussion Ensemble provides members musicians with a rich artistic experience through the performance of quality music for concert percussion. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Instrumental Chamber Music (MUN 4463) 1 credit
The study and performance of chamber music literature appropriate to the following instrumental areas, in any combination: piano (harpsichord, organ), strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, guitar and harp. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Jazz Guitar Ensemble (MUN 4486) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Course teaches the techniques and methodology of playing in a jazz guitar ensemble by performing arranged jazz charts and sight-reading. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Accompanying (MUN 4513) 1 credit
This course is designed to increase experience and exposure to the art of collaborative music-making. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Jazz Band (MUN 4713) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
An instrumental ensemble performing works from the jazz band repertoire. Performances are presented both on and off campus. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Chamber Jazz (MUN 4714) 1 credit
The performance of standard and contemporary jazz works by jazz combos with emphasis on improvisation and group interaction. Open by audition. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

¡Cantemos!, Latin American Choral Ensemble (MUN 4823) 1 credit
A chamber choral ensemble performing a wide repertoire of choral literature from the Iberian Peninsula, the Caribbean and Latin America.

University Klezmer Band (MUN 4890) 1 credit
The University Klezmer Band will learn, through ensemble preparation and performance, the historical and social context of Klezmer music, which is written and improvised Jewish music from various periods and cultures throughout the world. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Musical Theatre Workshop 1 (MUO 4006) 1 credit
Prerequisites: MVV 2171 with a grade of "C" or higher
Students have the opportunity to perform scenes from the Musical Theatre repertoire and improve skills associated with performing, such as acting, movement, stylistic choices, and working with the Director.

Musical Theatre Workshop 2 (MUO 4008) 1 credit
Prerequisites: MUO 4006 and approval from the vocal area chair
Students have the opportunity to perform scenes from the Musical Theatre repertoire and improve skills associated with performing, such as acting, movement, stylistic choices, and working with the Director.

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Opera Workshop 1 (MUO 4503) 1 credit
Prerequisites: MVV 2171, MUS 2201, MUS 2202, and approval of the area chair
Students have the opportunity to perform scenes from the opera repertoire and improve skills associated with performing, such as acting, movement, stylistic choices, and working with the Director.

Opera Workshop 2 (MUO 4504) 1 credit
Prerequisites: MUO 4503 and approval of area chair
Students have the opportunity to perform advanced scenes from the opera repertoire and improve skills associated with performing, such as acting, movement, stylistic choices, and working with the Director.

Commercial Music Forum (MUS 1010) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Music majors only
This course is designed as a forum with the overall goal of bringing together and stimulating interaction between students in the commercial music program. Weekly activities include, but are not limited to, committee heads' reports, film and/or video presentations, individual committee and heads' meetings, presentations by visiting music industry professionals, and general reports of Hoot/Wisdom label activities.

Concert Attendance (MUS 1011) 0 credit
Prerequisite: Music majors only
Concert attendance enables students to experience a variety of student, faculty, and other professional-level performances. Music majors must register for Concert Attendance until they have received a minimum of six satisfactory grades. Transfer students must consult the Music Department to determine the appropriate minimum requirements. Grading: S/U

University Honors Seminar in Music (MUS 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
A seminar in the University Honors Program on topics in music.

Gateway to Musical Perception (MUS 2101) 3 credits
Conceptually-based, skills-oriented musical perception course for Music majors only. Its purpose is to develop: 1) active listening; 2) an understanding of musical terminology and elements; 3) familiarity with instrument types and vocal styles; 4) historical and cultural musical perspective. The goal is to build skills that will benefit majors in all areas of their music course work—theoretical, historical, applied and performance. Lectures will be amended by examples selected from a variety of Western Art, World, and Popular musics.

Diction for Singers 1 (MUS 2201) 1 credit
Prerequisites: Must have two semesters of MVV Applied Voice at FAU and/or approval of the vocal area chair
A vocal music course in diction covering the Latin, Italian, and German languages.

Diction for Singers 2 (MUS 2202) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUS 2201 with a grade of "C" or higher
A vocal music course in diction covering the English, Spanish, and French languages.

Diction for the Choral Conductor (MUS 2207) 1 credit
Prerequisites: Must have two semesters of MVV Applied Voice with a "C" or better and/or approval of the vocal area chair; audition required
A vocal music course in lyric diction, meeting twice weekly, covering the basic concepts of the International Phonetic Alphabet and its application to English, Italian, German, French, Spanish and Latin song literature.

Music Study Abroad (MUS 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Cooperative Education - Music (MUS 3949)1-2 credits

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Computer Music Sequencing (MUS 4343) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Read music, computer familiarity
Course covers the basics of music MIDI programming and music audio recording techniques in an interactive environment.

Directed Independent Study (MUS 4905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: permission of department
Total credit for independent study in any one semester is restricted. Intensive study of theoretical or historical topics and composition. Research paper or composition required. Consult Department advisor.

Topic Research (MUS 4910) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course for majors is to be taken the penultimate semester of the senior year as a preparation for the Research Project, MUS 4912, a requirement for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music. The purpose of this course is to facilitate approval of the research project topic and to begin the process of documentation of that project through gathering source material and construction of an outline. Grading: S/U

Commercial Music Topic Research (MUS 4911) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Commercial Music majors only by permission
A course taken by majors during the penultimate semester of the senior year as preparation for the Commercial Music Research Project, MUS 4913. This course helps students establish and solidify the research project topic and provides writing guidelines for the final research project. Grading: S/U

Research Project (MUS 4912) 3 credits

Prerequisite: MUS 4910
This course is taken the final semester of the senior year in fulfillment of the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music. The course requirements consist of an independent research project on an original topic in music history or theory and a formal paper at the advanced level with full supporting documentation.

Commercial Music Research Project (MUS 4913) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of MUS 4911; Commercial Music majors only
Taken in the final semester of the senior year, this course serves as the completion of the supervised research project with supporting documentation.

Special Topics (MUS 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The study of a special area of music. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Commercial Music Internship (MUS 4940) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Commercial Music Department
Internship that reflects the student's track within the Commercial Music Degree. Credits will vary depending upon content of internship, to be determined by the Commercial Music advisors. Grading: P/F.

Music Study Abroad (MUS 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Music Theory 1 (MUT 1111) 3 credits
An introduction to the foundations of music theory including elementary sight singing, dictation and four-part writing of the Common Practice Period.

Music Theory 2 (MUT 1112) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 1111 with a grade of "C" or higher
A continuation of MUT 1111 including writing and analysis of all diatonic vocabulary devices of the Common Practice Period and an introduction of the chromatic vocabulary through the study of secondary dominant function.

Sight Singing and Ear Training 1 (MUT 1241) 1 credit
Development of aural skills through the study of sight singing, musical dictation and keyboard exercises.

Sight Singing and Ear Training 2 (MUT 1242) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUT 1241 with a grade of "C" or higher
A continuation of MUT 1241.

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Music Theory 3 (MUT 2116) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 1112 with a grade of "C" or higher
A continuation of MUT 1112 including an in-depth study, with emphasis on part-writing, of chromatic devices of the Common Practice Period including modulation.

Music Theory 4 (MUT 2117) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2116 with a grade of "C" or higher

A continuation of MUT 2116 including continued study of chromatic devices of the Common Practice Period, with emphasis on analysis of musical structures in Western music and the study of chromaticism.

Sight Singing and Ear Training 3 (MUT 2246) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUT 1242 with a grade of "C" or higher
A continuation of MUT 1242.

Sight Singing and Ear Training 4 (MUT 2247) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUT 2246 with a grade of "C" or higher
A continuation of MUT 2246.

Introduction to Commercial Arranging (MUT 2341) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 1112
An introduction to harmony and arranging as used in commercial music. Course examines basic skills and techniques that translate to all commercial genres.

Jazz Improvisation 1 (MUT 2641) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2116 or permission of instructor
An intensive study of jazz improvisation through classroom performance on voice or instrument. Emphasis will be placed on scales, chords, modes, harmonic progressions and musical patterns which are common to the jazz repertoire.

Jazz Improvisation 2 (MUT 2642) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2641 or permission of instructor
Continuation of the work of the prerequisite course.

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Music Theory: Orchestration (MUT 4311) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2117 with a grade of "C" or higher
Scoring for small and large instrumental ensembles with emphasis on scoring for non-professional-level musicians.

Jazz Theory and Arranging 1 (MUT 4353) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2246 or permission of instructor
Arranging for small ensembles.

Jazz Theory and Arranging 2 (MUT 4354) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 4353 or permission of instructor
Continuation of Jazz Theory and Arranging 1 with emphasis on arranging for large jazz band.

Music Theory: Form and Analysis (MUT 4611) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 2117, MUH 4211 with a grade of "C" or higher
Analysis of musical structures in Western music.

Jazz Styles and Analysis 1 (MUT 4663) 2 credits
Prerequisites: MUT 2642 or permission of instructor
A study of jazz styles from the Bebop era to the present. Includes analysis of transcribed solos as recorded by major jazz artists; development of aural recognition of contemporary harmonic and linear musical vocabularies.

Jazz Styles and Analysis 2 (MUT 4664) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUT 4663 or permission of instructor
Continuation of work of prerequisite course.

Special Topics (MUT 4930) 1-3 credits

Applied Music

Because of the relatively complex nature of course numbering for all areas of applied music study, the student is advised to consult the Music Department office before registering for applied music. All applied music courses require permission of the instructor.

Class Piano (MVK 1111) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MUT 1111, Music majors only
The first of four class piano courses designed to assist non-piano Music majors prepare for the piano proficiency requirement. This course develops rudimentary keyboard skills and practice strategies focusing on the major scales, arpeggios, and cadences. Music majors only. May be repeated for credit three times. Grading: S/U

Class Piano (MVK 1112) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MVK 1111
The second of four class piano courses assisting non-piano music majors to prepare for the piano proficiency requirement. This course further develops keyboard skills and practice strategies for playing scales, arpeggios, and harmonic progressions in minor keys. It also covers melodic transpositions and introduces basic concepts relevant to preparation for MVK 2121. May be repeated for credit three times. Grading: S/U

Applied Music Secondary MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 1210-1216) 1 credit
Private instruction. For students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Secondary, Trumpet (MVB 1211)
Applied Music Secondary, French Horn (MVB 1212)
Applied Music Secondary, Trombone (MVB 1213)
Applied Music Secondary, Euphonium (MVB 1214)
Applied Music Secondary, Tuba (MVB 1215)
Applied Music Secondary, Piano (MVK 1211)
Applied Music Secondary, Harpsichord (MVK 1212)
Applied Music Secondary, Organ (MVK 1213)
Applied Music Secondary, Percussion (MVP 1211)
Applied Music Secondary, Violin (MVS 1211)
Applied Music Secondary, Viola (MVS 1212)
Applied Music Secondary, Violoncello (MVS 1213)
Applied Music Secondary, Contrabass (MVS 1214)
Applied Music Secondary, Voice (MVV 1211)

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Guitar (MVJ 1213) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Bass (MVJ 1214) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Major, Harp (MVS 1215) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Freshman-level applied instruction in harp.

Applied Music Principal MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 1310-1316) 1 credit
Freshman-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

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Applied Music Principal, Trumpet (MVB 1311)
Applied Music Principal, French Horn (MVB 1312)
Applied Music Principal, Trombone (MVB 1313)
Applied Music Principal, Euphonium (MVB 1314)
Applied Music Principal, Tuba (MVB 1315)
Applied Music Principal, Piano (MVK 1311)
Applied Music Principal, Harpsichord (MVK 1312)
Applied Music Principal, Organ (MVK 1313)
Applied Music Principal, Percussion (MVP 1311)
Applied Music Principal, Violin (MVS 1311)
Applied Music Principal, Viola (MVS 1312)
Applied Music Principal, Violoncello (MVS 1313)
Applied Music Principal, Contrabass (MVS 1314)
Applied Music Principal, Guitar (MVS 1316)
Applied Music Principal, Voice (MVV 1311)
Applied Music Principal, Flute (MVW 1311)
Applied Music Principal, Oboe (MVW 1312)
Applied Music Principal, Clarinet (MVW 1313)
Applied Music Principal, Bassoon (MVW 1314)
Applied Music Principal, Saxophone (MVW 1315)

Applied Music Principal, Electric Guitar (MVJ 1313) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Freshman-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Principal, Electric Bass (MVJ 1314) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Freshman-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Major MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 1411-1416) 2 credits
Freshman-level private instruction for performance majors studying their major applied area. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Major, Trumpet (MVB 1411)
Applied Music Major, French Horn (MVB 1412)
Applied Music Major, Trombone (MVB 1413)
Applied Music Major, Euphonium (MVB 1414)
Applied Music Major, Tuba (MVB 1415)
Applied Music Major, Piano (MVK 1411)
Applied Music Major, Harpsichord (MVK 1412)
Applied Music Major, Organ (MVK 1413)
Applied Music Major, Percussion (MVP 1411)
Applied Music Major, Violin (MVS 1411)
Applied Music Major, Viola (MVS 1412)
Applied Music Major, Violoncello (MVS 1413)
Applied Music Major, Contrabass (MVS 1414)
Applied Music Major, Guitar (MVS 1416)
Applied Music Major, Voice (MVV 1411)
Applied Music Major, Flute (MVW 1411)
Applied Music Major, Oboe (MVW 1412)
Applied Music Major, Clarinet (MVW 1413)
Applied Music Major, Bassoon (MVW 1414)
Applied Music Major, Saxophone (MVW 1415)

Beginning Didgeridoo Workshop (MVW 2020) 1 credit
Course provides hands-on experience in learning and performing on the didgeridoo, an ancient Australian Aboriginal wind instrument capable of producing a wide range of timbres and rhythms. Course is designed to have positive benefits for non-musicians as well as vocalists and instrumentalists through focus on diaphragm breathing, instrument making, and musical experimentation. May be repeated for credit.

Class Piano (MVK 2121) 1 credit

Prerequisite: MVK 1112
The third of four class piano courses designed to assist non-piano music majors prepare for the piano proficiency requirement. This course focuses on harmonization, improvisation, sight-reading, and choral arrangement skills. It also covers the keyboard skills and practice strategies necessary to play solo pieces. May be repeated for credit three times. Grading: S/U

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Class Piano (MVK 2122) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MVK 2121
The fourth of four class piano courses designed to assist non-piano music majors prepare for the piano proficiency requirement. This course focuses on completing required solo piano pieces. More advanced application of keyboard skills and practice strategies are developed. May be repeated for credit three times..Grading S/U

Introduction to Stage Presence for the Vocal Artist (MVV 2171) 1 credit
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Provides students with an understanding of the dramatic presence of musical entity, but especially of music that is sung.

Applied Music Secondary MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 2220-2226) 1 credit
Sophomore-level private instruction for students studying a secondary applied area. (See course description for MV(B,K,P,S,V,W) 1210-1216.) Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Guitar (MVJ 2223) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Bass (MVJ 2224) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Major, Harp (MVS 2225) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Sophomore-level applied instruction in harp.

Applied Music Principal MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 2320-2326) 1 credit
Sophomore-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied area. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. (See course description for MV(B,K,P,S,V,W) 1310-1316.) See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Principal, Electric Guitar (MVJ 2323) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Sophomore-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Principal, Electric Bass (MVJ 2324) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Sophomore-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

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Applied Music Major MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 2420-2426) 2 credits
Sophomore-level private instruction for performance majors studying their major applied area. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. (See course description for MV(B,K,P,S,V,W) 1411-1416.) See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Sight Reading (MVK 2522) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course strengthens the pianist's sight-reading skills.

Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy (MVV 2601) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Open to Music majors only
For students taking applied voice as an introduction to their instrument. The course addresses basic vocal psychology, vocal health and preservation, vocal techniques, an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet, voice classifications and common voice disorders (symptoms and treatments).

Jazz Class Piano (MVK 3173) 1 credit
Designed to prepare non-pianists to pass the jazz proficiency requirements of the jazz studies major. Students will progress at their own rate and may test out of portions of the requirements at any time. At such time that the requirements are fulfilled, the student will no longer be required to attend. May be repeated for credit three times.Grading: S/U

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Guitar (MVJ 3233) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Bass (MVJ 3234) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Major, Harp (MVS 3235) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Junior-level applied instruction in harp.

Applied Music Principal MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 3330-3336) 1 credit
Junior-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied area. (See course description for MV(B,K,P,S,V,W) 1310-1316.) May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Junior Performance Recital (MVO 3330) 0 credit
Prerequisite: Must pass sophomore level of applied lesson and be recommended for recital by the applied area
Corequisite: Applied at the junior level (numbers will vary by instrument)

This course is required of all Performance majors during the semester of their junior recital. The 30-minute Junior Performance Recital must include works from style periods as designated in the applied syllabus and as appropriate for the instrument. Junior Performance Recital must be taken in conjunction with an applied lesson 3000 level.

Applied Music Principal, Electric Guitar (MVJ 3333) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Junior-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Principal, Electric Bass (MVJ 3334) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Junior-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Major MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 3430-3436) 2 credits
Junior-level private instruction for performance majors studying their major applied area. (See course description for MV(B,K,P,S,V,W) 1411-1416.) May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Piano Pedagogy (MVK 3631) 3 credits
A study of the methods, techniques and literature related to the teaching of piano from the beginning level through the advanced level of performance. Required for all Chamber Music/Accompanying Majors.

Classical Guitar Pedagogy (MVS 3606) 2 credits
Survey of classical guitar pedagogical materials and techniques.

Advanced Didgeridoo Workshop (MVW 4040 ) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MVW 2020 with a grade of "C" or better
As a continuation of MVW 2020, this course continues the development of playing technique and personal style, with the goal of composition and performance.

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Guitar (MVJ 4243) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Secondary, Electric Bass (MVJ 4244) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
Private instruction for students whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

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Applied Music Major, Harp (MVS 4245) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Senior-level applied instruction in harp.

Applied Music Principal MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 4340-4346) 1 credit
Senior-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied area. (See course description for MV(B,K,P,S,V,W) 1310-1316.) May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Senior Performance Recital (MVO 4340) 0 credit
Prerequisite: Must pass the Junior Performance Recital (MVO 3330) and be recommended for recital by the applied area
Corequisite: Applied at the senior level (numbers will vary by instrument)
This course is required of all Performance majors during the semester of their senior recital. The 60-minute Senior Performance Recital must include works from style periods as designated in the applied syllabus and as appropriate for the instrument. Senior Performance Recital must be taken in conjunction with applied lesson 4000 level.

Senior Music Education Recital (MVO 4342) 0 credit
Prerequisite: Must pass junior level applied and be recommended for recital by the applied area
Corequisite: Applied at the senior level (numbers will vary by instrument)

This course is required of all Senior Music Education majors during the semester of their recital. The 30-minute recital must include works from style periods as designated in the applied syllabus and as appropriate of the instrument. Senior Music Recital must be taken in conjunction with an applied lesson 4000 level.

Applied Music Principal, Electric Guitar (MVJ 4343) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Senior-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Principal, Electric Bass (MVJ 4344) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Audition required
Senior-level private instruction for non-performance majors studying their principal applied areas. May be repeated for credit. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Applied Music Major MV (B,K,P,S,V,W 4440-4446) 2 credits
Senior-level private instruction for performance majors studying their major applied area. (See course description for MV(B,K,P,S,V,W) 1411-1416.) May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Accompanying Literature and Techniques 1 (MVK 4702) 2 credits
A study of the major repertoire for voice and piano from the Classical era through the present day. Emphasis placed on analysis and interpretation of art song.

Accompanying Literature and Techniques 2 (MVK 4703) 2 credits
Open to pianists and instrumentalists, this course is designed to give the student hands-on experience in a variety of collaborative settings, under the direction of an experienced collaborative arts performer and coach, with emphasis on instrumental collaboration and improved sight reading skills.

Vocal Pedagogy (MVV 4640) 2 credits
Prerequisites: MUE 2430, MUS 2201, and MUS 2202
The anatomy and physiology of the breathing and vocal apparatus and other techniques as they apply to teaching voice in a one-on-one setting.

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Music Graduate Courses

Music Composition (MUC 6251) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Applied lessons in composition. Students compose original works in a variety of media and styles.

Advanced Composing and Arranging for TV/Radio Commercials (MUC 6605) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Course teaches students the basic composing and arranging techniques required to score commercials and jingles.

Advanced Music Composition for Film (MUC 6615) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Course is designed to teach the basic composing, arranging, and techniques required to score films and television.

Music Education Seminar (MUE 6938) 3 credits
An overview of various aspects of music education, including discussion of historical background, problems, philosophy, and current trends. Required of all M.A. in music candidates with graduate assistantships.

Graduate Choral Conducting (MUG 6205) 2 credits
Study of representative examples of choral literature and the conducting and rehearsal techniques needed for artistic realization of their performance.

Applied Graduate Choral Conducting (MUG 6206) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: MUG 6205
This course is available to students who have passed the choral conducting audition and who have selected choral conducting as their principal instrument at the graduate level. May be repeated for credit.

Graduate Instrumental Conducting (MUG 6305) 2 credits
Study of representative examples of band and/or orchestral literature and the conducting and rehearsal techniques needed for artistic realization of their performance.

Applied Graduate Orchestral Conducting (MUG 6306) 1-2 credits
An advanced in-depth study of standard orchestral repertoire in a wide variety of styles and periods as well as the study of the conducting and rehearsal techniques needed for the artistic realization of performance through applied private lessons. Score studies, including historical research and theoretical analysis, are components of this course. Course may be repeated for credit.

Applied Graduate Instrumental Conducting (MUG 6309) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: MUG 6305
Advanced in-depth study of orchestral and wind ensemble conducting through applied private lessons. Score study including historical research and theoretical analysis are components of this course. May be repeated for credit.

20th-Century Music (MUH 6375) 3 credits
A survey of the history, literature, and theoretical developments in the music of the 20th century.

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World Music Seminar (MUH 6588) 3 credits
A series of graduate seminars each focusing on a specific world musical tradition or area. May be repeated for credit.

Women Composers in the Western Tradition (MUH 6625) 3 credits
A survey of the works and historical context of women composers from the Middle Ages through the present. Issues in feminist musicology will also be considered.

Seminar in Historical Styles (MUH 6688) 1 credit
Seminar providing an in-depth overview of Western music history from antiquity through the 20th century. May not be taken for M.A. in Music degree credit.

Seminar in Commercial Music History (MUH 6689) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Students examine the history of commercial music from folk music tradition to popular 20th-century music.

Music History Seminar (MUH 6935) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Must pass Music History Placement Exam or earn a grade of "B" or higher in MUH 6688
An in-depth study of selected historically significant aspects of music history from the ancient Greeks to the present. Required of all M.A. candidates in music.

Graduate Piano Literature (MUL 6410) 3 credits
Prerequisites: MUL 4400, 4401
The study of advanced piano works will include those in large forms. Students will prepare parts of large works for class.

Graduate Classical Guitar Literature (MUL 6435) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Admitted to master's degree program in Music
In-depth study of classical guitar solo literature, chamber music, works for voice and guitar and for guitar and orchestra.

Survey of Orchestra Literature (MUL 6505) 3 credits
Course provides a survey of orchestra literature from the early classical period through the 20th century, focusing on innovations, the changing roles of orchestral instruments, performance style and techniques, and the interpretive and/or compositional philosophies of the composers studied.

Graduate Survey of the Concerto (MUL 6528) 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: MUS 6716
This course surveys the major repertoire for solo instrument(s) and orchestra from the Baroque era through the present day. It offers the solo instrumentalist the opportunity to better analyze, interpret, and prepare for the performance of concertos with orchestra. Non-performers will also benefit from in-depth discussion of selected repertoire by major concerto composers.

Survey of Symphonic Wind Literature (MUL 6555) 3 credits
Students completing this course will be able to aurally identify the pivotal, important, and major works of the symphonic wind repertoire.

Survey of Chamber Music Literature (MUL 6565) 3 credits
Survey of chamber music repertoire for piano and one other instrument, piano four-hands, piano trio, quartet, and quintet.

Survey of Chamber Wind Literature (MUL 6567) 3 credits
Students completing this course will be able to aurally identify the pivotal, important, and major works of the wind ensemble repertoire, including works for 8 to 24 winds and percussion.

Graduate Survey of Art Song (MUL 6606) 3 credits
Course will survey the major repertoire for solo voice and piano from the Classical era through to the present day.

Advanced Studies in Choral Music: A Survey of Choral Literature (MUL 6648) 3 credits
A survey of choral forms and their development: the madrigal, motet, mass, cantata oratorio, and secular choral settings of the 19th and 20th centuries as well as major works.

Survey of Opera Literature (MUL 6671)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the History entrance exam
A survey of opera literature in western history and culture, the course includes historical, musical and dramaturgical analysis of opera literature from its origins through the Modern Era.

The Life and Works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (MUL 6852) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor
An in-depth study of the life and artistic and social legacy of one of history's greatest creative figures, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Advanced Music Publishing and Copyright (MUM 6306) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course teaches students how to manage their intellectual property.

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Advanced Legal Issues for the Musician (MUM 6307) 3 credits
Course presents an in-depth study of the legal aspects of the music business with an emphasis on recording contracts and music publishing issues.

Advanced Audio Engineering for the Musician (MUM 6627) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUM 4625 or permission of instructor
Teaches students the basics of audio engineering and recording techniques in an interactive environment. Students use the FAU recording studio to create projects and work together in a collaborative effort. They learn the process and skills necessary to engineer their own recordings and work effectively in a professional recording studio.

Advanced Music Marketing and Public Relations (MUM 6726) 2 credits
Course covers the marketing and publicizing of music. Targeting the proper demographics, pricing, packaging, alternative marketing, and public relations will all be discussed.

Advanced Music Production (MUM 6727) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course teaches the advanced study of the artistic and technical skills necessary to be a music producer with a focus on record production.

Graduate Chamber Winds (MUN 6146) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
A performing ensemble in the Department of Music, the Florida Atlantic University Chamber Winds course provides member musicians with a rich, artistic experience through the formal performance of quality music for chamber wind ensembles including works for 4 to 18 players.

University Symphony Orchestra (MUN 6215) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Symphony Orchestra is dedicated to performing standard repertoire in a wide variety of styles and periods at the highest levels of musicianship. May be repeated for credit.

Choral Ensembles: Graduate Level (MUN 6315) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Choral Ensembles are open to FAU students by audition only. Class activities include weekly rehearsals and a minimum of two performances per semester. Enrollment is not limited to music majors or minors. May be repeated for credit.

University Wind Ensemble (MUN 6425) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition required
The Florida Atlantic University Wind Ensemble performs major, important works in a wide variety of styles. Each semester there is at least one concert performance. May be repeated for credit.

Graduate Collaborative Piano Performance (MUN 6458) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Audition demonstrating fluent sight-reading at Royal Conservatory of Music level five or above
This course is designed to increase practical piano performing experience in the realm of collaborative arts through weekly work in small ensembles of two or more performers.

Graduate Instrumental Chamber Music (MUN 6465) 1 credit
The study and performance of chamber music literature appropriate to the following instrumental areas in any combination: piano (harpsichord, organ), strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, guitar and harp.

Graduate Chamber Jazz Ensemble (MUN 6715) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Entrance by audition
The study, preparation, and performance of historic and contemporary works for small jazz ensembles.

Graduate Large Jazz Ensemble (MUN 6716) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Entrance by audition
The study, preparation, and performance of historic and contemporary works for the large jazz ensembles.

World Music Ensemble (MUN 6806) 1 credit
This variable topics course is performance-based learning of world music ensemble tradition(s). Each semester the class will explore the music and culture of select genres chosen from the traditions of Africa, the Americas, and Asia.

Opera Workshop 1 (MUO 6505) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Provides students with a closer look at the skills and techniques needed to be successful on the operatic stage, including audition technique, scene and aria analysis, a basic craft for acting, improvisation, stage movement, language declamation and dramatic and musical preparation to culminate in a staged performance of opera scenes.

Opera Workshop 2 (MUO 6507) 1 credit
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Provides students with a closer look at the skills and techniques needed in improvisation, stage movement, language declamation and dramatic and musical preparation. The semester culminates in a staged performance of one or more scenes from the operatic literature.

Advanced Studies in Choral Literature: Mass and Motet (MUR 6108) 3 credits
An historical study of the development of the mass and motet as musical forms.

Lyric Diction 1 (MUS 6205) 2 credits
Prerequisites: Previous study of lyric diction and International Phonetic Alphabet or permission of instructor
A course in diction reviewing concepts of International Phonetic Alphabet and covering aspects of lyric diction as it relates to the graduate art song and operatic repertoire, with particular emphasis on the English, Italian, German and French languages. The course is appropriate both for singers and collaborative pianists.

Lyric Diction 2 (MUS 6206) 1 credit
Prerequisites: Previous study of lyric diction and International Phonetic Alphabet or permission of instructor
Consists of in-class coaching in lyric diction reviewing concepts of International Phonetic Alphabet and covers aspects of lyric diction as it relates to the graduate art song and operatic repertoire, with particular emphasis on English, Italian, German and French languages. The course is appropriate for singers, choral conductors and collaborative pianists.

Introduction to Graduate Research (MUS 6716) 2 credits
A comprehensive review of library research facilities available for advanced study in all areas of music. Required of all M.A. candidates in music.

Directed Independent Study (MUS 6906) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Total credit for independent study in any one semester is restricted. This is an intensive study of theoretical or historical topics and composition. A research paper or composition is required. Consult Department advisor.

Advanced Commercial Music Internship (MUS 6940) 1-3 credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, permission of instructor
Designed for graduate students who want to experience a work environment in the music business. Assignments may include music licensing, copyright registration, audio engineering, concert promotion, royalty collection, public relations, music production, as well as other related music industry activities. Credits vary depending upon the internship. Grading: S/U

Special Topics (MUS 6933) 1-5 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The study of a special area of music. Topic will vary. The course may be repeated for credit.

Thesis/Recital/Lecture (MUS 6971) 1-6 credits
Presentation of a project in the form of a thesis, performance recital, or a combined lecture/recital. Grading: S/U

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Graduate Orchestration (MUT 6346) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Scoring for a variety of instrumental ensembles, with a emphasis on concert, film and commercial music.

Music Seminar in Theoretical Styles (MUT 6935) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Must pass Graduate Music Theory Placement Exam or earn a grade of "B" or higher in MUT 6936
Chronological study of harmonic, melodic, rhythmic, and formal features of traditional music by means of analysis along with the composition and performance of original works in specific forms and styles. Required of all M.A. in Music candidates.

Seminar in Music Theory Pedagogy (MUT 6936) 3 credits
A survey of analytic and pedagogic problems in the field of music theory, including a study of materials and publications currently available. May not be taken for M.A. in Music degree credit.

Graduate Applied Music - Trumpet (MVB 6351) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Horn (MVB 6352) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Trombone (MVB 6353) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Euphonium (MVB 6354) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Tuba (MVB 6355) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Electric Guitar (MVJ 6253) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate Music major and permission of department
Private instruction for graduate students studying their principal applied area. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Graduate Applied Music - Electric Bass (MVJ 6254) 1-2 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate Music major and permission of department
Private instruction for graduate students studying their principal applied area. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. See Music Department for specific course requirements.

Graduate Applied Music - Piano (MVK 6351) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Organ (MVK 6353) 1-2 credits

Graduate Piano Pedagogy (MVK 6650) 3 credits
Students will prepare teaching techniques on intermediate through advanced repertoire. Instructor will evaluate teaching techniques and suggestions. New concepts in teaching will be discussed.

Graduate Piano Pedagogy 2 (MVK 6651) 3 credits
Prerequisite: MVK 6650
Students will learn how to teach advanced piano works, including piano concerti, cyclic works, and longer piano sonatas.

Graduate Applied Music - Percussion (MVP 6351) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Violin (MVS 6351) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Viola (MVS 6352) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Cello (MVS 6353) 1-2 credits

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Graduate Applied Music - String Bass (MVS 6354) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Harp (MVS 6355) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Guitar (MVS 6356) 1-2 credits

Graduate Orchestral Repertoire (MVS 6550) 3 credits
Applied course in orchestral excerpts for violin, viola, cello or double bass. Specific repertoire is determined by the applied lesson instructor. Students also attend weekly string studio class.

Graduate String Pedagogy (MVS 6650) 3 credits
Concentrates on the pedagogy and technique of string performance.

Graduate Classical Guitar Pedagog (MVS 6652) 2 credits
Prerequisite: Admitted to master's degree program in Music
In-depth survey of classical pedagogical materials and techniques at beginning through advanced levels.

Graduate Applied Music - Voice (MVV 6351) 1-2 credits

Vocal Pedagogy (MVV 6652) 2 credits
Course provides students with resources and information regarding the anatomy and physiology of the vocal apparatus and practical methodology for the voice studio and the choral rehearsal.

Graduate Vocal Pedagogy 2 (MVV 6662) 1 credit
Prerequiste: MVV 6652
Provides students with resources and information on practical methodology for voice studio. Students engage in supervised teaching.

Beginning Didgeridoo Workshop (MVW 6150) 1 credit
The aim of this course is the development of basic didgeridoo techniques, such as circular breathing, tone production, and vocalization, through hands-on participation, group interaction, performance, and composition.

Advanced Didgeridoo Workshop (MVW 6160) 1 credit
Prerequisite: MVW 2020 or MVW 6150 with grade of "C" or higher or permission of instructor
As a sequence to MVW 2020 or MVW 6150, this course will continue the development of playing techniques, with the goal of the development of a personal playing style through composition and performance.

Graduate Applied Music - Flute (MVW 6351) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Oboe (MVW 6352) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Clarinet (MVW 6353) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Bassoon (MVW 6354) 1-2 credits

Graduate Applied Music - Saxophone (MVW 6355) 1-2 credits

For all graduate-level applied music study:
Prerequisites: Four years of undergraduate applied music and permission of instructor.
Graduate applied music study may be repeated for credit.

Theatre and Dance

Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Modern Dance 1 (DAA 2100) 3 credits
A beginning course in the development of modern dance technique, composition and theory. May be repeated for credit.

Modern Dance 2 (DAA 2101) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; audition first day of class
Intermediate-level modern dance technique course comprising terminology, anatomy, history, theory, and performance for students with previous training. May be repeated for credit.

Ballet 1 (DAA 2200) 3 credits
Beginning-level ballet technique course comprising terminology, anatomy, history, theory, and performance for students with little or no previous ballet experience. May be repeated for credit.

Ballet 2 (DAA 2201) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; audition first day of class
Intermediate-level ballet technique course comprising terminology, anatomy, history, theory, and performance for students with previous training. May be repeated for credit.

Ballet 3 (DAA 2202) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; audition first day of class
Advanced-level ballet technique course comprising terminology, anatomy, history, theory, and performance for students with previous training. May be repeated for credit.

Jazz Dance 2 (DAA 2501) 3 credits
Prerequisite: DAA 2100 or DAA 2201 or permission of instructor/audition
A beginning course in the development of jazz dance technique, composition and theory. May be repeated for credit.

Tap Dance 1 (DAA 2520) 3 credits
A beginning course in the development of tap dance technique, composition and theory. May be repeated for credit.

Teaching Dance K-12 (DAE 4300) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Methods and materials of specified dance forms.

Appreciation of Dance (DAN 2100) 3 credits
A study of the aesthetics, origins, and development of dance. Lecture, discussion, videos, and, when possible, live performances. This is a General Education course.

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Directed Independent Study (DAN 4905) 1-4 credits

Special Topics (DAN 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The study of a special area in dance. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Appreciation of Theatre (THE 2000) 3 credits
A study of the aesthetics, origins, development, social implications and practical processes involved in theatre production. Lecture, discussion, videos and, when possible, live theatre performances are employed to bring students to an appreciation of the vital role theatre plays in society. This is a General Education course.

Script Analysis (THE 2305) 3 credits
Lecture/discussion course designed to help the student learn how to read drama as a performance-based art form and imagine the transition from page to stage. A variety of classical and modern scripts are used.

Theatre Study Abroad (THE 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Production Hour (THE 3952) 1 credit
Participation in the production program of the curriculum; work in preparation and performance. May be repeated for up to 12 credits.

History of Western Theatre (THE 4104) 3 credits
A study of the origins and development of theatre in Europe and the U.S. through the analysis of various plays and their authors.
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)

Theatre History 1 (THE 4110) 3 credits
History of theatre from the Greeks to the 17th century.

Theatre History 2 (THE 4111) 3 credits
History of theatre from the 17th century to the present.

History of Fashion and Decor 1 (THE 4284) 3 credits
Survey of ancient through 14th century European historical detail in clothing, architecture and artifacts as a vocabulary used in theatrical design.

History of Fashion and Decor 2 (THE 4285) 3 credits
Survey of European and American historical detail in clothing, architecture and artifacts from the 15th through the 19th century as a vocabulary used in theatrical design.

History of Fashion and Decor 3 (THE 4286) 3 credits
Survey of American and European historical detail in clothing, architecture and artifacts from the 20th through the 21st century as a vocabulary used in theatrical design.

Acting Shakespeare (THE 4334) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 2110
Covers the techniques of acting Shakespeare and other verse texts. Class work is performance based with an exploration of Shakespeare through soliloquy and scene work.

Drama on Stage and Screen (THE 4370) 3 credits
Selected playscripts and screenplays are studied, with emphasis on analyzing how dramatic literature functions in the theatre and in motion pictures. Consideration is given to such matters as dramatic structure, genres, audience, and performance styles.

Dramatic Theory and Genre (THE 4500) 3 credits
Prerequisites: THE 4110 and THE 4111
An in-depth study of dramatic theories underlying genre forms in Western drama, with special attention to theories and genres that have most influenced 20th-century theatre.

Studies in Live Theatre Performance (THE 4564) 3 credits
Attendance at theatre performances and subsequent class discussion enhance an understanding of the artistic processes involved in the creation of live theatre. Course explores the interdisciplinary and collaborative nature of theatre production, considers theatre production from both the practical and theoretical points of view, and examines the societal issues raised by various plays.

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Directed Independent Study (THE 4905) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair
May be repeated for credit.

Special Topics (THE 4930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The study of a special area in theatre. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Summer Repertory Theatre Workshop (THE 4955) 1-18 credits
The study and practical application of acting/directing and/or technical/design skills for repertory theatre performance. May be repeated for credit.

Theatre Study Abroad (THE 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Visual Imagination (TPA 2000) 3 credits
An introductory course dealing largely with the elements of design and the principles of composition as they apply to the various subdisciplines of theatre art.

Lighting Design 1 (TPA 2023) 2 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Classroom and laboratory study of the principles of modern lighting design for the theatre.

Costume Design 1 (TPA 2040) 2 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Classroom and laboratory study of the principles of modern costume design for the theatre.

Scene Design 1 (TPA 2063) 2 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Classroom and laboratory study of the principles of modern scene design for the theatre.

Rendering (TPA 2071) 2 credits
Prerequisites: THE 4284, TPA 2000, TPA 2200, and TPA 2342C
Classroom and laboratory study of drawing, painting, and presentation techniques employed in the rendering of designs for the theatre.

Introduction to Production (TPA 2200) 3 credits
Theory and stage practice in the planning, construction and operation of stage production elements and related equipment.

Theatrical Makeup (TPA 2248) 2 credits
Prerequisite: B.F.A. standing or by permission of instructor
Actor training in the basic techniques of stage makeup application.

Drafting for the Theatre (TPA 2342C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Course focuses on drafting techniques, particularly on concepts and methods of table drafting.

Scenery Design Topics (TPA 3092) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Course covers special topics areas, such as scene painting, advanced rendering, and model construction. Course may be repeated for credit with new topic only.

Lighting Design Topics (TPA 3223C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Course covers special topics areas, such as lens theory, electrical theory, automated luminaries, and paperwork. Course may be repeated for credit with new topic only.

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Stage Costume Topics (TPA 3231) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Course covers special topics areas, such as dying and painting, costume crafts, patterning, construction, and millinery techniques. Course may be repeated for credit with new topic only.

Stage Technology Topics (TPA 3311C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPA 2000 and TPA 2200
Course covers special topics areas, such as computer-aided design, welding, structural engineering, advanced carpentry skills, or scenic automation. Course may be repeated for credit with new topic only.

Lighting Design 2 (TPA 4021) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced classroom and laboratory study of the principles of modern lighting design for the theatre.

Costume Design 2 (TPA 4041) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced classroom and laboratory study of the principles of modern costume design for the theatre.

Scene Design 2 (TPA 4061) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced classroom and laboratory study of the principles of modern scene design for the theatre.

Stage Management (TPA 4601) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 2100, TPA 3311C and (TPA 3223C or TPA 3231)
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)
Detailed study in stage management techniques and practical application during the preproduction, rehearsal, and performance processes.

Introduction to Acting (TPP 2100) 3 credits
A beginning-level acting class. This course begins to define the highly disciplined process for the future professional actor. Explorations in three basic areas of human involvement; relationship to objects, environment, and people.
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)

Acting 1 (TPP 2110) 3 credits
A beginning-level acting class for theatre majors only. This course begins to define the highly disciplined process for the future professional actor. Explorations in three basic areas of human involvement; relationship to objects, environment, and people.

Voice for the Actor 1 (TPP 2710) 3 credits
Study and practice in voice principles for the stage. Special emphasis on integrated use of voice and body, stage projection, and recognition of improper use of voice. Theatre majors only by permission of instructor.

Speech for the Actor 1 (TPP 2711) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 2710
Practice in skills of articulation and projection for the stage. Includes study of IPA "stage standard" speech and dialects.

Musical Theatre Technique (TPP 3251) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 2110, permission of instructor
Covers the techniques of acting for the musical theatre. Class work is largely performance-based, with an exploration of song scores as the actor’s text. Explores characterization and issues of acting styles.

Movement for Actors (TPP 3510) 3 credits
A course in developing awareness, freedom, and ease of movement. Students study a variety of movement disciplines and develop a movement vocabulary for use in warm-up, rehearsal, and performance.

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Stage Combat (TPP 3531) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 2100 and TPP 4175 (Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)
A practical physical study for the intermediate to advanced actor, to safely create the illusion of stage violence. This course focuses on safe techniques, and the mental and physical discipline needed for unarmed as well as some armed combat within a scene study context.

Voice for the Actor 2 (TPP 3711) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 2710
Continued study in voice production for the stage with emphasis placed on direct application of the principles to various forms of dramatic text and character development. Will focus on specific individual challenges in the voicing process. By permission of instructor.

Speech for the Actor 2 (TPP 3730) 3 credits
Advanced study of dialects and their application to the process of characterization.

Acting 4 (TPP 4140) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 4176 or equivalent
Studies and projects in various acting styles and periods.

Acting 2 (TPP 4175) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 2100 or equivalent (Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)
Studies and projects in the development of a variety of characters through a scene study approach, each assignment will have defined goals toward specific acting competencies.

Acting 3 (TPP 4176) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 4175
Projects in advanced characterization.

Acting 5 (TPP 4265) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 2100, 4175, 4176 (Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)
Identifies the special needs of the actor in front of the camera in either film or video. It provides a basic working vocabulary and the techniques needed to confront the major issues of camera acting.

Acting 6: Advanced Acting for the Camera (TPP 4268C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Senior Theatre or Communications majors only; TPP 4175, TPP 4176, TPP 4265
Focused on advanced techniques to aid the actor in the transition from stage to film work. An examination of film acting and its physical characteristics, this advanced acting course will effectively examine many of the most common situations faced by the film actor and solutions to the problems they present. Students will rehearse and perform in a simulated studio setting.

Directing 1 (TPP 4310) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 2100, TPP 4175, and permission of instructor
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)
Students gain practical experience in play direction through the study and application of script breakdown and analysis, basic staging techniques and basic directing theories. Students direct a scene or "10-minute" play.

Directing 2 (TPP 4311) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 4310 or equivalent
Advanced script analysis and rehearsal methods. Experience in staging classical texts and other modern theatrical genres, such as farce and absurdism. Students will direct a short play.

Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen 1 (TPP 4600) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Study of the arts and craft of writing for the stage and film. Analysis of selected contemporary scripts. Students write a short play or film script.

Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen 2 (TPP 4601) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPP 4600
Advanced work in writing for the stage and other media. Selected playscripts and screenplays will be examined. Students will write a full-length play or screenplay.

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Theatre and Dance Graduate Courses

Experience in Dance Rehearsals and Performance (DAA 5688) 1-3 credits
Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor
Experience in dance rehearsals and public performance. Enrollment is by audition only. This course may be repeated for credit.

Directed Independent Study (DAN 5905) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading and research in an area of dance. The topic is to be approved by the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit.

Special Topics in Dance (DAN 5930) 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The study of the selected area in dance. Topics may vary. The course may be repeated for credit.

Applied Research in Design for the Theatre (THE 5287) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
This course prepares the student in the various theatre design disciplines to conduct research as it relates to graduate study and educational and professional objectives.

Seminar in Dramaturgy Literature (THE 5315) 3 credits
Study of dramatic works from the Greeks to the early 19th-century theatre, with emphasis on the plays as originally performed and in revival. Intensive investigation and script analysis with reports, lectures, and discussions.

Special Topics (THE 5930) 1-3 credits
The study of a special area in theatre. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Graduate Script Analysis (THE 6309) 3 credits
Prerequisite: M.F.A. Theatre majors only unless prior permission is received from the instructor
Assists students in learning to read play scripts as the basis of a performance-based art form, to deconstruct and analyze scripts and understand their meaning and functionality and to image the script's transition from page to stage, allowing the student to apply those skills to their individual artistic process.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Seminar in Dramatic Theory and Genre (THE 6507) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The study of selected theories of drama from Aristotle to the present.

Directed Independent Study (THE 6909) 1-4 credits
Involves reading, research, and creative activities in theatre with a program of study selected and reviewed in consultation with Department faculty members. The course may be repeated for credit.

Special Topics (THE 6930) 1-3 credits
The study of a special area in theatre. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Professional Internship (THE 6940) 1-9 credits
Involves theatre internship residency in an accredited professional company in acting, directing, design, technical theatre, or theatre management. The course may be repeated for credit. Grading: S/U

Summer Repertory Theatre Workshop (THE 6955) 1-14 credits
The advanced study and practical application of acting/directing and/or technical/design skills for repertory theatre performance. The course may be repeated for credit.

Creative Thesis (THE 6972) 1-6 credits
Grading: S/U

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Advanced Scene Design (TPA 5062L) 3 credits
Prerequisite: TPA 2063
The solving of assigned problems and criticism in designing plays and musicals. Includes evaluation of styles in settings.

Arts Management (TPA 5580) 3 credits
Prerequisite: 13 credits in theatre
A study of the areas of theatre management: organization, economics, public relations, finance, and audience.

Professional Showcase (TPA 6950L) 3 credits
Involves graduate production work on performance. The course may be repeated for credit. Grading: S/U

Graduate Acting Studio 1 (TPP 5115) 3 credits
Advanced methods of performance in realistic plays.

Graduate Acting Studio 2 (TPP 5116) 3 credits
Advanced methods of performance in classical plays.

Acting for the Camera (TPP 5266) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 2100, 4175, 4176 (Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)
An acting course that identifies the special needs of the actor in front of the camera in either film or videotape. This course provides a basic working vocabulary and the techniques needed to confront the major issues of camera acting.

Graduate Acting for Film and Television (TPP 5267) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 5115, 5116
Studio class designed to give the graduate actor experience in the practical application of techniques utilized in commercial, film, and television acting.

Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen 1 (TPP 5615) 3 credits
Advanced practical workshop in playwriting and screen writing with focus on such matters as dramatic construction, characterization, and realistic diaglogue. In-class reading of works and end-of-term public readings.

Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen 2 (TPP 5616) 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
Advanced practical workshop in writing plays and screenplays with emphasis on developing professional skills in dramatic construction, revision, characterization, and diaglogue. In-class reading of works and end-of-term public readings.

Graduate Acting Studio 3 (TPP 6146) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 5115, 5116
A continuation of acting training with emphasis on Shakespeare.

Graduate Acting Studio 4: Special Challenges in Acting (TPP 6147) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 5115, 5116, 6146
Through consultation with the collected performance faculty, students will identify specific challenges in their individual acting process and, through targeted scene study, discover the means to overcome them.

Performance Skills (TPP 6199) 3 credits
Involves practice in voice production, the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), articulation, dialect, and body movement. It may be repeated for credit.
(Course no longer offered effective summer 2014.)

Advanced Directing (TPP 6316) 3 credits
Advanced training in staging of classical plays and theatrical genres, such as farce, absurdism, and fantasy.

Voice for the Graduate Actor 1 (TPP 6715) 2 credits
Prerequisite: M.F.A. in Theatre majors only
Vocal training for the graduate actor emphasizing release of physical tension as well as proper use of the vocal apparatus to enhance resonance, projection and the ability to work on impulse.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Voice for the Graduate Actor 2 (TPP 6716) 2 credits

Prerequisites: TPP 6715 with a grade of B- or higher and M.F.A. in Theatre majors only
Continued voice work with emphasis on self-assessment of vocal habits and development of the ability to self-correct any that are detrimental to the actor. The use of the voice in classical texts is explored.
(New course effective spring 2015.)

Voice for the Graduate Actor 3 (TPP 6717) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 6716 with a grade of B- or higher and M.F.A. in Theatre majors only
Graduate voice work with emphasis on vocal variety and flexibility utilizing the works of Shakespeare.
(New course effective fall 2015.)

Voice and Speech for the Graduate Actor 4 (TPP 6718) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 6717 and TPP 6819 with a grades of B- or higher and M.F.A. in Theatre majors only
Advanced accent work with a focus on researching, designing, articulating to others and performing with an accent while maintaining vocal power, flexibility, resonance and intelligibility.
(New course effective spring 2016.)

Speech for the Graduate Actor 1 (TPP 6817) 2 credits
Prerequisite: M.F.A. in Theatre majors only
Advanced speech course for the graduate actor focusing on articulation for intelligibility and familiarity with the International Phonetic Alphabet and its application in accent work.
(New course effective fall 2014.)

Speech for the Graduate Actor 2 (TPP 6818) 2 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 6817 with a grade of B- or higher and M.F.A. in Theatre majors only
Training for the graduate actor in accent acquisition and performance.
(New course effective fall 2015.)

Speech for the Graduate Actor 3 (TPP 6819) 3 credits
Prerequisites: TPP 6818 with a grade of B- or higher and M.F.A. in Theatre majors only
Advanced work on the articulation of sound in the works of William Shakespeare, as well as training in accent acquisition.
(New course effective fall 2015.)

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Visual Arts and Art History


Undergraduate Courses/link to graduate courses

Honors Art Appreciation (ARH 1930) 3 credits
Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule)
Prerequisites: Approval from the University Honors Program; students must satisfy college prep requirements if not already enrolled in undergraduate study.

Honors section of art appreciation. Introduction to the visual arts with slides and films.

Art Appreciation (ARH 2000) 3 credits
Understanding art. Lecture course with films and slides. Grading: Pass/fail option; Art majors must take course for a regular grade. This is a General Education course.

Art History Survey 1 (ARH 2050) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Students must satisfy college prep requirements if not already enrolled in undergraduate study
The first half of a two-course sequence in the history of art with ARH 2051. Delineates the development of visual art media from their first appearance in the Paleolithic period through the floruit of Classical antiquity and the re-ordering of art in the Middle Ages. Architecture is treated as a form of art, as well as a venue for other art media, such as sculpture and painting.

Art History Survey 2 (ARH 2051) 3 credits
Prerequisite: Students must satisfy college prep requirements if not already enrolled in undergraduate study
The second half of a two-course sequence in the history of art with ARH 2050. Delineates the development of visual art media from the European Renaissance through the present day. In addition to painting, sculpture, architecture and other art media, this course explores the often competing discourses surrounding them, such as art criticism, theory, philosophical debate and issues regarding patronage and reception.

Art History Study Abroad (ARH 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

History of Ceramics (ARH 4013) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2050 or ARH 2051 with minimum grade of "C," or permission of instructor
Explores the many aspects of art in clay, from pottery to sculpture, on a global scale. While articulated in terms of chronology and geography, the course highlights common socioeconomic contexts of production, as well as issues regarding the role of the individual, gender, economic status and other factors that have influenced and conditioned ceramics as a craft and as an art medium.

British Architecture (ARH 4061) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
A chronological survey of British building placed in its social, cultural, and architectural context, beginning with Saxons and ending with the modernists and postmodernists of today.

History of Modern Architecture (ARH 4067) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
A general history of modern architecture; its evolution in America and Europe from traditional forms to functional and international styles.

Pre-Classical and Classical Art (ARH 4100) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
Art and architecture from pre-classical times to the fall of the Roman Empire, including Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek and Roman art.

Greek Art and Archaeology (ARH 4130) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 with minimum grade of "C" or permission of instructor
A survey of art and archaeology of the Greeks and peoples related to their ancient civilization from prehistoric times through the advent of the Roman domination in the first century B.C.E. Special emphasis is given to the Bronze Age proto-civilizations that spawned Greek myths and legends (e.g. Minos of Crete and the Trojan War), as well as the achievements of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods in the first millennium B.C.E.

Rome Across the Centuries (ARH 4152) 4 credits

Prerequisite: ARH 2000 with minimum grade of "C" or permission of instructor
A survey of archaeological, art historical and historical issues pertaining to the development of the city of Rome from its earliest prehistory through the 20th century. Focus on major monuments of the city and historical trends in art, as well as the ways in which Rome itself has been transformed into a theme in art and to some extent literature, including film.

The Impact of Pompeii: Pompeii, Herculaneum and the Origins of Art History (ARH 4153) 4 credits

Prerequisite: ARH 2000 with minimum grade of "C"
A survey of almost two centuries of archaeological exploration at Pompeii, Herculaneum and other key sites in the area of Mount Vesuvius (Naples, Italy) and the significance of these discoveries to knowledge of ancient history in the Mediterranean, Greek and Roman civilization, as well as the development of art and the discipline of art history in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Medieval Art (ARH 4200) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
Art of the Christian world from the 1st to the 14th centuries.

Renaissance Art and Architecture (ARH 4305) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
History of art and architecture in Italy and northern Europe from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

Baroque Art (ARH 4350) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
Art in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries.

18th- and 19th-Century Art (ARH 4371) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
Art from the Rococo period to postimpressionism.

Modern Art: 1863-1945 (ARH 4450) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
Art movements in Western society from 1863 until 1945, including impressionism, expressionism, cubism, non-representational art, constructivism and surrealism.

Contemporary Art (ARH 4470) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ARH 2050 and ARH 2051 or permission of department
New movements in Western art from 1945 to the present.

Art of China (ARH 4557) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
This course is to introduce, from a comparative approach, an overall view of the Chinese arts since ancient time so that students will become aware of the Chinese aesthetic value and its historical involvement.

American Painting and Sculpture (ARH 4610) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
A study of American painting and sculpture from its colonial beginnings to the avant-garde movements of the present day.

History of Photography (ARH 4710) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections; Students in the photography concentration will have first preference at registration
Surveys the emergence of photographic processes beginning in 1839 and extends to present-day digital technology. Provides a coherent view of photographic practices, significant photographers, aesthetic movements and the impact of photography upon our understanding of images.

History of Graphic Design (ARH 4724) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
An investigation of historical and contemporary visual communications, concepts, media, and images and their role in graphic design.

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* Course may be repeated for credit

Museum Studies and Gallery Practices (ARH 4794) 4-8 credits
Prerequisite: One 4000-level Art History course
Investigation of the many characteristics of museum and gallery management, including hands-on participation in University Galleries' ongoing productions. A mandatory lab hour requirement of four hours per week amounts to half of the student's grade.

Selected Readings in Art History (ARH 4900) 4 credits
Prerequisite: At least 8 credits of course work in the area of selection with a "B" average; ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
Selected readings in Art History.

* Topics - Art History (ARH 4930) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ARH 2000 or both Art History Survey sections
Art of various cultural periods and/or thematic frameworks.

*Art History Senior Seminar (ARH 4937) 4 credits
Prerequisites: 16 credits of course work in upper-division Art History
The historiography of art history, readings, and writings on art historical topics.

Art History Study Abroad (ARH 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Design (ART 1201C) 3 credits
Two dimensional design. Studio course with lectures. Required for art majors.

Three-Dimensional Design (ART 1203C) 3 credits
Studio course introducing basic elements inherent in three-dimensional works of art. Projects, demonstrations, lab, lecture, slides, and critique.

Drawing 1 (ART 1300C) 3 credits
Beginning drawing. Required for art majors.

Special Topics in Art (ART 1933C) 3 credits
Elective course for students to complete project work dealing with rotating topics in studio arts. The instructor provides oversight, feedback and criticism of the students’ work. Projects may explore ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture and/or intermedia and may vary each time the course is offered.

Color Fundamentals (ART 2205C) 3 credits
The practical application of the color theories, focusing on the interaction and relativity of color. Students will develop a working color vocabulary through a series of projects illustrating the seven color contrasts. Restricted to Art majors.

Drawing 2 - Figure Drawing (ART 2330C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 1300C
Further development of technical/perceptual drawing skills, emphasis on the human figure. Required for Art majors.

* Printmaking 1 (ART 2400C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, ART 1300C
Introduction to studio printmaking techniques in intaglio, relief, and screen printing.

* Printmaking 2 (ART 2401C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2400C, ART 2205C
Intermediate projects in intaglio, relief, or screen printing processes with an emphasis on exploration of methods, media, and color printing.

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* Painting 1 (ART 2500C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C and ART 1300C and ART 2205C or permission of instructor
Beginning-level painting course. Fundamentals of painting techniques, materials and color application. Emphasis on process of painting.

Painting 2 (ART 2501C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2500C, ART 2330C
Intermediate painting. Refinement of painting skills, color awareness and conceptual development.

Introduction to Digital Art (ART 2600C) 3 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C; students must satisfy college prep requirements if not already enrolled in undergraduate study
An introductory course for understanding and applying basic art and design principles and terminology within the digital environment along with the study of the historical and theoretical development of new media in art. Satisfies the digital art component in the art foundation core.

* Sculpture 1 (ART 2701C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 1203C
Problems in sculptural form and composition with the exploration of materials, techniques, and conceptual approaches.

* Ceramics - Beginning Wheel (ART 2751C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, ART 1300C, ART 1203C
Basic wheel-throwing course. Technical skills of wheel work stressed with other aspects of clay work included, such as the aesthetics of form, glaze work, kiln loading, firing. Demonstration, critiques and slides.

Ceramics - Intermediate Wheel (ART 2752C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2751C, ART 1203C, ART 2330C, or permission of instructor
Continued investigation into the understanding of techniques, directions, processes of clay through wheel throwing. Vessel approach emphasized as well as contemporary ceramic issues. Includes lectures, demonstrations, glaze experimentation, slides, kiln loading and firing.

Art Study Abroad (ART 2952) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

Alternative Media (ART 3161C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, 1300C, 2205C, 2330C
Introduces students to a variety of materials that can be used in the creation of artistic composition. Special emphasis is placed on the imaginative use of everyday objects as artistic devices. Some traditional media are used in conjunction with these non-traditional media.

Narrative Drawing (ART 3383C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, 1300C, 2205C, 2330C
A 2D studio course that, through a series of exercises, investigates a variety of media and techniques to enhance the narrative repertoire of a visual artist. Course includes an emphasis on problem solving and elements that form strong visual images and ideas.

Printmaking 3 (ART 3402C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2400C, ART 2330C
Studio projects in printmaking including photo processes with an emphasis on technical skills, individual development, and creative expressions.

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* Course may be repeated for credit

Intermediate Painting (ART 3522C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2500C, 1201C and 1300C, or permission of instructor
Refinement of painting skills and conceptual development with emphasis on developing a contemporary art practice.

* Advanced Painting (ART 3531C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 2501C
Emphasis on technical conceptual and creative development.

Digital Imaging in Fine Arts (ART 3612C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, ART 2205C, ART 1300C, and ART 2330C
Designed for fine art majors, this course will establish a foundation in digital imaging with other art-making processes. Students will learn and apply computer hardware components and art-related software packages. Emphasis will be on aesthetics and content; computer hardware and software applications are merely vehicles for creating art. This course will address issues pertaining to art, culture and technology. (No previous experience with computers is required. This is not a programming or commercial applied graphic design course.) Projects, demonstrations, lectures, lab, critiques.

Sculpture 2 (ART 3710C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2701C, ART 1203C, ART 1300C, ART 2205C, ART 2330C, or permission of instructor
Intermediate problems in sculpture with emphasis on the exploration of materials, media, and the development of individual concepts.

* Ceramics - Handbuilding 1 (ART 3764C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1203C, ART 1300C, ART 1201C
Studio fine art course introducing fundamentals in handbuilding through various projects which emphasize technique, creativity, problem-solving methods giving the student a working knowledge of clay. Includes demonstrations, lectures, critiques, slides, glaze work, kiln loading and firing.

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Handmade Books: Structure and Binding (ART 4173) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 1201C, 1300C, 2205C, or permission of department
Art studio course that visually examines traditional and alternative book structures in relationship to narrative content. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to creative processes involved in book making, including traditional and alternative book formats, adhesives and sewn binding structures, archival concerns, and methods for generating original images and text.

Advanced Drawing (ART 4311C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: 6 credits of Drawing
Emphasis on technical and creative problems.

* Topics - Drawing (ART 4332C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, 1300C, and 2330C, or permission of instructor
Topics in life; rendering; graphics; experimental.

* Advanced Printmaking (ART 4403C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 3402C
Advanced studio projects in printing with emphasis on individual concepts and criticism.

* Topics - Printmaking (ART 4405C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 4403C or permission of instructor
Creative, experimental, and aesthetic explorations in printmaking with an emphasis on individual development and criticism.

* Topics - Painting (ART 4506C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 3531C or permission of instructor
Topics in watercolor, figure painting, or materials and techniques.

* Advanced Sculpture (ART 4712C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 3710C
Advanced problems in the various techniques of sculpture. Emphasis on individual creative expression.

* Topics - Sculpture (ART 4732C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 4712C or permission of instructor
Special topics in sculpture including various techniques and exploration of environmental, site-specific, performance, conceptual, and installation projects.

Ceramics - Intermediate Handbuilding (ART 4761C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 3764C, ART 1203C, or permission of instructor
Sculptured approach to clay; emphasis on glaze techniques and firing.

* Advanced Ceramics (ART 4782C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: 12 credits of ceramics (ART 2751C, ART 3764C, and ART 4761C or ART 2752C) or permission of instructor
Emphasis on technical and creative problems.

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* Course may be repeated for credit

Ceramics - Clay and Glazes (ART 4785C) 4 credits

Prerequisites: ART 2751C, ART 3764C, ART 4761C, or ART 2752C
In-depth study of ceramic materials, focusing on the formulation of clay and glazes, testing, firing, lectures, and introduction to computer programs.

* Directed Independent Study (ART 4906C) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: Three courses in area of intended research and permission of instructor
Independent undergraduate studies in areas of interest.

* Directed Independent Study (ART 4908C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Senior standing
Designed for seniors to produce a fully realized computer-video graphic project. Students work independently and periodically present projects-in-process to the class. Special areas of concentration such as 3D modeling, animation, storyboarding, or compositing are suggested by students with acceptance by the instructor.

* Area Studies in Art (ART 4930C) 1-4 credits
Concentration in the studio area of ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, and/or sculpture, which vary depending upon special facilities or locations.

* Special Topics (ART 4932C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Portfolio or equivalent
Elective course for students to complete project work dealing with computer arts in a specific field of their choosing. The instructor provides oversight, feedback, and criticism of the students' work. Projects of choice may include 2D and 3D, web design, games, interactive media, and other related topics.

* Museum Internship (ART 4942C) 4-8 credits
Prerequisites: Completion of at least two courses in Art History with a grade of "B" or better, permission of chair, and approval the semester prior to taking this course
Inservice training in art-related area.

Senior Seminar for B.A. Studio Arts (ART 4954) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Prepares student for careers in the arts through writing assignments, presentations, examination of current opportunities and directions in the art field, and the assembling of an effective portfolio representative of the student's work. Required for all B.A. Art majors.

Senior Seminar (ART 4955C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Preparation for exhibition in annual graduating art students show. Examination of current opportunities and directions in the Art field; the assembling of an effective portfolio representative of the students work. Required for all B.F.A. Art majors.

Art Study Abroad (ART 4957) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit for enrollment in approved study abroad programs.

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* Course may be repeated for credit


Visual Design Lab 1 (GRA 2190C) 4 credits

Prerequisites: ART 1201C, ART 1300C, ART 2600C
An introductory course in graphic design with emphasis on form, content, and principles of design and layout composition. Students will become familiar with tools, processes and the language of design as applied to visual communication. Projects, demonstrations, lab, lecture, and critiques.

Typographic Design Lab 1 (GRA 2208C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, 1203C, 2600C, GRA 2190C, all with minimum grades of "C"
An introduction to the fundamentals of typography exploring experimental approaches of letterform construction and terminology and developing a sound understanding of all components related to typographical composition and design practices. Projects, demonstrations, lab, lecture and critiques.

Principles of Visual Communication (GRA 3102C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: GRA 2190C, GRA 2208C and GRA 3112C, or permission of instructor
A studio course for Graphic Design majors designed to increase visual awareness and understanding of the impact that images have in the visual message making process. An investigation into methods to generate ideas and concepts through cognitive process. Design principles and image making techniques such as: ideation process, information hierarchy, visual metaphors and composition will be explored.

Typographic Design Lab 2 (GRA 3112C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GRA 2208C
Typography is one of the few unchanging elements in graphic design. Whether a word is to be printed or part of a screen-based project, a working knowledge of type is essential for any graphic designer. This course develops choice-making skills with regard to context, content and audience, as well as explores the emotional, aesthetic and historical components of typographic communication.

Poster Design (GRA 3174C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GRA 3193C
Course focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of poster design. Students learn how to design a poster, what information to include, and how to draw attention through the use of visual metaphors. Students are encouraged to take risks and learn how to effectively communicate complex concepts on a single page, integrating text and images for ultimate impact. Emphasis on expressive, creative communication through the graphic design medium and on high-quality portfolio development.

Visual Design Lab 2 (GRA 3193C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: GRA 2208C
Corequisite: GRA 3112C
Examines the design of systems including the development and application of symbols as communicative signifiers. Conceptual development, context, simplicity, unity and contrast are examined as the means for efficient application of systems across media.

Technology Intensive (GRA 3435C) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2600C, Graphic Design majors only
Designed to acquaint students with the features and appropriate uses of primary creative programs used in the field of graphic design. Explores the tools and user interface associated with each program. Open to all students wishing to have a more complete knowledge of the programs used in design. May be repeated for credit up to three times.

Visual Design Lab 4 (GRA 4115C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: GRA 3112C, GRA 3193C and GRA 4194C
Focuses on theoretical and practical aspects of editorial design with concentration on magazines and self-promotional projects. Emphasis on expressive and creative communication through graphic design and on portfolio development to produce high-quality printed portfolio pieces. Mandatory portfolio review at the end of the course.

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Advanced Advertising Design (GRA 4116C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: GRA 2190C and GRA 3112C
An advanced studio course in advertising design that will provide students with an opportunity to create a variety of both individual advertisements and creative concepts. Some historic overview will be covered.

Typographic Design Lab 3 (GRA 4183C) 4 credits

Prerequisite: GRA 3112C
Focuses on time-based composition and animation of typographic vocabulary through the use of current software. Elements of motion design are introduced with the objective of enhancing visual form, meaning and communication, emphasizing the relationship between typography principles and animation fundamentals.

Visual Design Lab 3 (GRA 4194C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: GRA 3112C, GRA 3193C; Graphic Design majors only
Focuses on theoretical principles and the practical application of graphic design to three-dimensional structures, which may include but are not limited to package, environmental and exhibition design. Practical and conceptual concerns, materials, context and brand application are addressed. Emphasis on appropriateness, creativity and portfolio-quality work.

Interactive Design Lab 1 (GRA 4521C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 2600C, GRA 2208C
Addresses the prevalent design considerations at work in the development of online content. Explores the current relevant technologies and discusses the issues, opportunities and obligations of the designer in the development of interactive media.

Interactive Design Lab 2 (GRA 4522C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: GRA 3112C, GRA 4521C; Graphic Design majors only
Focuses on the introduction of principles of interactivity related to user experience. Examines the design of user-interfaces and the development of advanced interactive visual strategies through the study of current or emerging technologies.

* Topics - Graphic Design (GRA 4932C) 1 to 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The course will enable the Department to introduce areas of graphic design not covered in the established curriculum.

* Photography 1 (PGY 2401C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: ART 1201C or permission of instructor
Beginning course, no prior photography experience required. Lectures, demonstrations, lab work and critiques will deal with the basics of black and white photography.

Digital Photography 1 (PGY 2800C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C; access to a digital camera with manual exposure capabilities is required
This course offers a basic introduction to the principles underlying both digital and traditional photography. Through assignments, lectures, and critiques students develop aesthetic, technical, and conceptual skills with the digital camera.

Applied Digital Photography (PGY 3821C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C; access to a digital camera (7 MP or more) is required
This course exposes the student to professional practices in digital imaging. The student applies digital photography skills to solve specific problems relating to workflow, color management, data management, lighting, and image manipulation.

Photography 2 (PGY 4410C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C and PGY 2401C or permission of instructor
Familiarity with camera, camera handling, darkroom, and black and white processing is required. Course is directed to building a body of consistent and competent black and white work through regular assignments and critiques.

* Advanced Photography (PGY 4420C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C, PGY 2401C, and PGY 4410C or permission of instructor
Experience in camera handling and darkroom processes required. Several increasingly involved projects deal with both black and white and color processes.

* Topics - Photography (PGY 4440C) 4 credits
Familiarity with camera handling and darkroom processes required. Course topics vary depending upon circumstances. Classes held as workshops, lectures, demonstrations, as well as study material will be determined by topic, availability of facilities and/or instructor.

Digital Photography 2 (PGY 4822C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: ART 1201C; access to a digital camera (7 MP or more) is required
An intermediate course that utilizes computer software, scanners, and photo quality printers to articulate personal expression with a digital camera. Contemporary practices in both commercial and aesthetic applications of digital photography are surveyed.

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Visual Arts and Art History Graduate Courses

Studio Arts Pedagogy in Higher Education (ARE 6276) 2 credits
Prerequisite: MFA in Visual Arts and Art History students only, or permission of instructor
Prepares M.F.A. candidates in the studio arts for careers in the professoriate. Focuses on the dynamic and wide-ranging arena that is visual arts pedagogy in higher education today. Diverse approaches to teaching will facilitate the development of each student’s practical teaching strategies in the context of a larger scholarly study of issues in pedagogy. Repeatable for credit up to two times.

Methods in Art History (ARH 5813) 4 credits

Prerequisite: Undergraduate Methods
Analysis of epistemological methods of art historians.

History of Ceramics (ARH 6015) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the M.F.A. program or permission of instructor
Explores many aspects of art in clay, from pottery to sculpture, on a global scale. Articulated in terms of chronology and geography, the course highlights common socioeconomic contexts of production, as well as issues regarding the role of the individual, gender, economic status and other factors that have influenced ceramics as a craft and as an art medium.

Seminar in Contemporary Art (ARH 6481) 4 credits
Prerequisites: Contemporary Art, Modern Art
A consideration of the multiple goals of art produced after 1945. Required of all M.F.A. students.

Seminar in Art History (ARH 6897) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
In-depth exploration of topics in the history of art from antiquity to the present using a narrative approach to issues of content and context regarding themes, periods and works of visual art and culture from western and/or non-western sources. Students use a variety of analytical frameworks and intellectual perspectives to engage in research, develop their own historical projects and deliver information in oral and written form both in individual and collaborative settings. Repeatable for credit.

Graduate Independent Study (ARH 6913) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Directed independent study of Art History, criticism, and theory in areas not covered by present program and which the student wishes to study. May be repeated.

Computer Arts Seminar in Contemporary Art (ARH 6931) 4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; bachelor's degree; portfolio
Critique and theory in Contemporary Art as it relates to Computer Arts. Required for M.F.A. in Computer Arts.

Computer Arts Seminar in General Theory (ARH 6932) 4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; bachelor's degree; portfolio
Critique and theory in General Theory as it relates to Computer Arts. Required for M.F.A. in Computer Arts.

Advanced Study in Painting Techniques (ART 5536C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
A graduate course in advanced study in painting techniques. The focus will be to explore their characteristics and range of aesthetic and expressive possibilities. May be repeated.

Advanced Ceramics (ART 5790C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Advanced study in ceramic techniques. May be repeated.

Directed Area Studies in Art (ART 5930C) 1-4 credits

Graduate Painting (ART 6580C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course will explore multiple aspects of expression in painting. A personal cohesive direction in student work will be expected, building toward the graduate documentation and show. May be repeated.

Studio in Computer Arts (ART 6688C) 1-6 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; bachelor's degree; portfolio
Principles and techniques in computer modeling, animation, rendering, and presentation with an emphasis on post-production. May be repeated for credit.

Creative Workshop in Computer Arts (ART 6692C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; bachelor's degree; portfolio
Ongoing weekly multiple-hour group discussion of computer graphic and video graphic student works-in-progress. Industry examples also analyzed. May be repeated for credit.

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Master's Portfolio in Computer Arts (ART 6693C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; bachelor's degree; portfolio
Ongoing planning and production and completion of a film or videographic presentation of an animation of finished professional quality.

Graduate Clay and Glaze Science (ART 6793C) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Required for Ceramics majors. Exploration of clay and glaze, science, theory, formulation, and application. Required of all M.F.A. Ceramics students.

Professional Practices (ART 6816) 2 credits

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the M.F.A. program in Visual Arts and Art History or permission of instructor
Rotating professional development topics such as teaching pedagogy, professional documentation, digital tools for the studio artist, studio critique and art writing to support the professional practices needed by an emerging artist. Repeatable for credit up to four times.

Graduate Studio (ART 6819) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the M.F.A. program in Visual Arts and Art History or permission of instructor

Focuses on the development of a conceptual framework communicated through a developing visual language, with intensive and comprehensive examination and critique of resulting forms and skillful execution in area of concentration. Repeatable for credit up to five times.

Directed Independent Study in Graphic Design (ART 6905) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: Written contract/proposal with objectives and written department/division permission
Independent research, advanced experiences in various areas of design study.

Graduate Directed Study (ART 6907C) 1-4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Investigation into advanced creative aesthetic issues and technical problems inherent in a graduate-level studio concentration. Variable credit depending upon scope and magnitude of work agreed to by the student and the Faculty Director. May be repeated.

Topics in Studio Art (ART 6930C) 1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Students may study or research an individual art project with an art faculty member. Complexity and amount of work will determine the number of credits granted. May be repeated.

Design Studio (ART 6931) 4 credits
Prerequisite: B.F.A. in Graphic Design or permission of instructor
Emphasis on beginning competent graduate body of work.

Special Topics in Computer Arts (ART 6931C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; bachelor's degree; portfolio
Topics based upon important trends and developments in Computer Arts. May be repeated for credit. Candidates, interns, auditors, and guests welcome.

Design Seminar (ART 6932) 4 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to M.F.A. program
Review of design research, criticism, and evaluation.

Special Topics Graphic Design (ART 6932C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: Admission to M.F.A. program or permission of instructor
Investigation of current topics in the field of study with an emphasis on the development of advanced conceptual and theoretical skills.

Graduate Documentation (ART 6956C) 4 credits
Required for all M.F.A. candidates. Course designated to draft, revise, and refine a comprehensive written documentation supporting the cohesive body of work produced during the final year or semester by the M.F.A. candidate. Prepared concurrently with ART 6972C (Graduate Thesis Exhibition).

Design Thesis (ART 6971C) 4 credits
Prerequisites: 28 credits of M.F.A. course work; permission of graduate committee
Preparation of thesis or visual project. Research based on independent research. May be repeated.

Graduate Thesis Exhibition (ART 6972C) 4 credits
Required for all M.F.A. candidates in Visual Arts with concentrations in Painting and Ceramics as well as for M.A.T. candidates. An exhibition of approved body of work for completion of M.F.A. degree. Prepared concurrently with ART 6956C (Graduate Documentation).

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Link to College of Arts and Letters Programs