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Export Control

Overview of U.S. Export Control at Florida Atlantic University 

There is a complex network of federal agencies and inter-related regulations that govern exports collectively referred to as “export controls.” These laws and regulations exist to protect national security and U.S. foreign policy interests. In brief, export controls regulate the shipment, transmission, or transfer, by whatever means, of items, software, technology, information and services out of the U.S. (termed an "Export" ). The U.S. Government also restricts certain releases or transfers to foreign nationals here in the U.S. (referred to as a "Deemed Export" ).

Florida Atlantic University (FAU) is committed to complying with all United States export control laws and regulations. These laws and regulations were created and implemented by agencies including, but not limited to, the Department of Commerce (Export Administration Regulations - EAR), the Department of State (International Traffic in Arms Regulations – ITAR), and the Department of the Treasury (Office of Foreign Assets Control – OFAC).

To ensure compliance with these regulations, all FAU researchers, employees, and students must review this website, and its related materials, to carefully consider the issues, their impact, how they occur, where they occur, and when they occur. The Division of Research assists the FAU community in identifying, analyzing, and managing all activities that are affected by export control regulations. Such activities include:

  • Sponsored and non-sponsored research
  • Collaborating with non-U.S. persons and entities
  • Traveling internationally
  • Shipping internationally
  • Providing non-U.S. persons and entities with financial support
  • Developing, hosting, and transferring technology

Failure to comply with U.S. export control laws and regulations, as well as FAU policies, can result in severe criminal and civil penalties against both the individual and the University. These penalties include imprisonment as well as significant monetary damages and can result in the loss of research contracts, governmental funding, and the ability to export items.



 Last Modified 11/16/17