Honors Seminars

Fall 2013

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Intellectual Foundations Category: Global Citizenship/Global Perspectives 

ANT 1930, AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE - Dr. Michael Harris
Anthropological insights into such domains of human life as childhood, play, biological needs, gender roles, social structure, family and kinship, economic organization, ritual, and religion are ordinarily taught in relation to non-western or non-North American cultures. In this course, you will conduct an examination of other cultures through the usual texts, while concurrently writing your own cultural life history. Each student will create and present her/his own anthropological autobiography in a series of structured weekly writings that are contextualized by understandings of other cultural groups' practices.

 

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Intellectual Foundations Category: Creative Expressions

ARH 1930, ART APPRECIATION - Dr. Karen Leader
A one-semester survey of major periods and personalities in the History of Art from earliest times in the Paleolithic period to contemporary art-making. Attention will be given not simply to formal characteristics of art but also to the historical context in which it was produced and major theories that art historians use today in order to interpret its development. Writing assignments will give students the opportunity to exercise their powers of observation and use of language and to explore their own responses to visual material and its meaning.

 

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Intellectual Foundations Category: Written Communications

ENC 1930, SCH. Seminar in Writing - Dr. Julia Mason
The Writing Honors Seminar is a course designed for the University Honors
students. While this course will introduce students to writing academic expository prose, it will go beyond ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 by exposing students to a range of writings found across the disciplines, to basic competence in information literacy and research, and to oral and visual as well as written communication. Its goal is to prepare students for the kinds of critical reading and writing tasks they will need to master as emerging scholars in their individual disciplines

 
 
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Intellectual Foundations Category: Global Citizenship

INR 2002, Introduction to World Politics - Dr. Jeffrey Morton
This course explores the complex, yet exciting, international system. Topics covered in Introduction to World Politics include nuclear weapons, terrorism, environmental degradation, global economics and, among others, international law & diplomacy.   Students who complete the course will possess a theoretical and conceptual understanding of world politics that will allow them to articulate solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges.

 

 

 

 
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Intellectual Foundations Category: Creative Expression

LIT 1930, Global Great Books - Dr. Mary Ann Gosser
Students will read “Great Books” from around the world and from different eras to explore the development of human consciousness and the presence of the “Other” from ancient Greece and Old Japan to modern Europe and the Caribbean islands. In this course, we study journeys that range from thrilling to terrifying—in strange lands peopled by monsters or eerie vales of delights. The authors to be read include Homer, Dante, Columbus, Voltaire, Basho, Swift, and Walcott, among others.

These writers describe men and women traveling through different real or imaginary landscapes and experiencing new things and people. Often, they discover their own identity by contrast with their lives, religions, languages, and customs of other tribes, regions, and nations, as they journey across large landscapes or into tiny villages. As they discover how their own actions can shape their perceptions, most—but not all—learn respect for the differences of the new lands.

 
 

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Intellectual Foundations Category: Creative Expression

MUS 1930, Honors History and Appreciation of Music - Dr. Ken Keaton
MUS 1930 is an honors section of the History and Appreciation of Music.  You will encounter the greatest works of the Art of Music from the past thousand years—works that have defined Western Civilization itself.  Along the way, you will also learn principles of writing and research in the arts, and be encouraged to express your own thoughts and experiences that you have discovered these encounters with music.  Come along and enjoy the ride!

 

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Intellectual Foundations Category: Society & Human Behavior

PHI 1930, Human Existence, Behavior and Society - Dr. Simon Glynn
This honors seminar course raises fundamental philosophical questions, and encourages student investigation and discussion of the Nature and Origins of human Consciousness, Identity, Values and Beliefs, and the ways in which these motivate and guide our Choices, Behavior, Actions, and Socio-Cultural Interactions. We will examine the extent to which each of these is the Product, and to what extent each is Productive or Constitutive of Social and Cultural Structures, and the implications of all of this for the methods of the Human and Social Sciences. In this context fundamental philosophical questions, such as those concerning Free Will, the Relation of the Individual to Society, Human Responsibility, Moral Values and the Meaning and Purpose of Life will be raised and discussed. 

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Intellectual Foundations Category: Global Citizenship

WST 4349, Green Consciousness (upper division) - Dr. Jane Caputi
This class explores emerging green or environmental consciousness in various cultural venues (theory/activism, spirituality, philosophy, literature, art and popular culture.

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