HOME   /   NEWSROOM  /   TRACKING APEX PREDATORS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO


TRACKING APEX PREDATORS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO  

apex

 


Harbor Branch researchers and collaborators used electronic tagging data from eight species, including billfishes, tunas and sharks to track when and for how long the highly mobile marine predators crossed international boundaries in the Gulf of Mexico.

Matt Ajemian, Ph.D, assistant research professor at FAU's Harbor Branch, co-authored the study titled, "Population connectivity of pelagic megafauna in the Cuba-Mexico-United States triangle."

The study, recently published in the journal Nature, found several species converged on a common seasonal movement pattern between territorial waters of the U.S. (summer) and Mexico (winter).

The research emphasizes the range of possibilities regarding the spatial distribution and movement of large pelagic fishes common to the Gulf of Mexico, and plainly shows a need for cooperative fisheries management among Cuba, Mexico, and the U.S. for many of the highly migratory species that inhabit these waters.