The Ocean Science Lecture Series 2010

The Ocean Science Lecture Series provides a forum for the community at large to learn about Harbor Branch's most recent discoveries directly from the scientists who made them.

Lectures are held in the auditorium of the Johnson Education Center on the Harbor Branch campus, 5600 U.S. 1 North, Fort Pierce. "In-Season" weekly lectures (January through March) are at 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m., followed by a meet-the-speaker reception. "Off-season" lectures (April through December) are at 7:00 p.m. only unless otherwise noted. There is no charge to attend.

If you are interested in sponsoring a lecture, or if you have any questions about the Ocean Science Lecture Series, please contact Jill Sunderland at 772-242-2506, or email at education@hboi.edu.

Click on the lecture titles to see more information about specific lecture topics.

January 13: Dr. Amy Wright - Florida Biotech: HBOI's Role in the New "Life Sciences Cluster"

Florida has significantly invested in recruiting organizations and companies conducting Life Science research.  Dr. Wright will highlight recent HBOI findings in marine natural products discovery and how HBOI is working with other members of the Florida Life Science Cluster.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

January 20: Dr. Shirley Pomponi - Drugs from the Sea: Sponges as Chemical Factories

Marine sponges are miniature chemical factories, producing thousands of chemicals with biomedical properties.  Why and how the sponges make these chemicals—and how they can be stimulated to produce them in the lab—is the topic of Dr. Pomponi's lecture.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

January 27: Dr. Susan Laramore - Oysters Got the Blues: Emerging Bivalve Disease and Climate Variability

Oysters filter our water, provide homes for many other species and are just plain good to eat.  Dr. Laramore will discuss the importance of oyster reefs and the impact of climate change on oyster (and human) health.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

February 3: Steve McCulloch - The Status of Marine Mammals in the IRL and a Stranding Center Reborn

Steve McCulloch will present an overview of population studies, life history, recent rescues, and the overall health of marine mammals in the Indian River Lagoon.  He will also discuss right whale research and Harbor Branch's new Marine Mammal Stranding Center.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

February 10: Dr. Brian Lapointe - Reefs, Wreckers, and Shipwreckers in the Florida Keys

Once loathed by humans for their role in ship groundings, the coral reefs of the Florida Keys are in deep trouble today.  Dr. Lapointe will trace the history of human perspectives towards these biologically diverse and economically important ecosystems.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

February 17: Dr. Joshua Voss - A Decade of Demise? Charting the Past, and Future, of Florida's Coral Reefs

Coral reefs have experienced dramatic and disturbing losses.  Some reefs may be recovering, and deeper corals may provide hope for the future.  Dr. Voss will discuss the recent history and potential future of Florida's coral reefs.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

March 3: Dr. Tammy Frank - Ocean Exploration and Deep-sea Research: Trials, Tribulations and Discoveries

The deep sea is the largest habitat on earth with many opportunities for discovery and exploration.  Dr. Tamara Frank will discuss some recent discoveries made on her research expeditions, and share the challenges and excitement of research in the deep sea.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

March 10: Dr. Paul Hargraves - The Life that Lives on Us

As a twist from our usual ocean-oriented talks, Dr. Hargraves will present a remarkable survey of the millions of mites, insects, fungi, bacteria, yeasts and algae that live happily on the skin of each and every one of us.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

March 17: Dr. Dennis Hanisak - Algae? This Is a Color?

Although often maligned by humans, algae are critical primary producers on our planet, providing food and oxygen for many other organisms.  Dr. Hanisak will take a quick look at the amazing algae, including their diversity, beauty, and roles in nature.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

March 24: Dr. Sara Edge - Using Ecological Genomics to Measure the Impacts of Global Climate Change on Reef Building Corals

Corals worldwide are impacted by a multitude of stressors, including the effects of global climate change.  Dr. Edge will investigate potential uses of new technology to forecast the future of our coral reefs.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

April 7: Dr. Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Ph.D. - Global Earth Observation and Climate Change

Retired Navy Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Ph.D., administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) from 2001 to 2008, will address both what is known and what is suspected about climate change, and his talk will emphasize the role of global observing systems in improving our knowledge and ability to provide credible science-based information for decision making.

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

May 5, 7 p.m. Various Presenters - Semester By The Sea: Training the Next Generation

This 2010 lecture is available online via streaming video. Click here to view video.

 

June 23, 7 p.m.: Mark and Diane Littler, Smithsonian Institution - Trials and Tribulations of Collecting Algae in Panama

July 21, 7 p.m.: Stephen Kajiura, Ph.D., Department of Biological Sciences - Seeing the World through a Shark's Eyes, and Other Sensory Systems of Elasmobranchs

September 22: Tammy Frank, Dennis Hanisak, John Reed, and Amy Wright

A Quick Look beneath the Surface: The Florida Shelf Edge Exploration (FLoSEE)

The Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research and Technology, based at HBOI/FAU, sponsored the Florida Shelf Edge (FloSEE) Expedition to characterize the mesophotic and deep reefs off of Florida’s coast and to assess their condition prior to potential impacts from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill.

November 17, 7 p.m.: John Trefry, Ph.D., Florida Institute of Technology

Arctic Meltdown

Some scientists predict that by mid-century the Arctic Ocean will be ice free during late summer each year. Such a seasonal meltdown may have far reaching consequences including impacts related to maritime transportation, oil spills, coastal erosion, northern migration of commercial fish species and loss of threatened and endangered species. Dr. Trefry will tell the story of an Arctic Meltdown in the context of his studies of the impacts of human activities, such as offshore oil exploration and production, and climate change in the Arctic.

December 15, 4 & 7 p.m.: Students of MOA

The Marine & Oceanographic Academy: Ocean Discovery with the Next Generation

Last Modified 1/14/14