Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory

 

Principal Investigator


Susan Laramore, Ph.D.
Assistant Research Professor
772-242-2525
slaramo1@fau.edu

 

Dr. Laramore is interested in aquatic animal health issues of aquacultured species, including biosecurity, disease prevention and how the aquatic environment affects the prevalence and intensity of diseases. Research has focused on viral diseases of crustaceans, parasitic diseases of bivalves, ecotoxicology of invertebrates, low salinity shrimp culture and nutritional studies. The Harbor Branch Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory provides health certification to shrimp, clam and oyster culturists and offers a variety of analytical services, including histology, PCR assays, RFTM and body burden analysis for oyster parasites, bacterial isolation, ID and antibiotic sensitivity tests, challenge and feed studies.


Current Grants and Recent Projects:

AQ plate small 
Some of this research is funded by proceeds from the Florida Aquaculture specialty license plate. 

Laramore S. Continuous and ongoing. “Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory.” Self funded. Provides client services (PCR, microbiology, parasitology) to aquaculture related industries, including health certification, feed studies, disease challenge studies.

Laramore S. 2010-present. “Bivalve parasite research.” Funded by the Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory and the HBOI Link Summer Intern Program. Examining prevalence and intensity of bivalve parasites in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, with an emphasis on the parasite, Bonamia spp. Range, bivalve hosts, seasonal prevalence, etc. are being explored using a combination of PCR and histological techniques.

Laramore SE, Scarpa J, and Wills P.  2013-2014. “Indian River State Aquaculture Degree Program.” Funded by Indian River State College. Provides hands-on instruction in aquaculture for degree and non-degree seeking students.  Students may opt to take one or two classes or obtain a one year Aquaculture Certificate or a two year AAS degree.

Laramore S. 2013-2014. “Incorporation of ex-situ biofloc and seaweed from a prototype IMTA system into shrimp diets.” Funded by the HBOI Aquaculture Specialty License Plate. This project incorporates two byproducts of the prototype land based IMTA system in aquaculture for use as a feed ingredient in shrimp diets. A waste product (ex-situ biofloc) and a harvested product (seaweed) will be used to replace a portion of the fish meal in shrimp diets. 

Scarpa J, Laramore S and Proffitt E. 2010-2012. Postdoctoral support (Holly Nance). “Use of Population Genetic Methods to Monitor Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on an Ecologically and Commercially Important Indicator Species, the Eastern oyster, Along Its Gulf Coast Range.” Funded by the FAU Foundation.   

Laramore S and Co-PI Garr A.  2010-2013. “The Impact of Crude oil and the dispersant Corexit on three key Gulf of Mexico Invertebrates Species.” Funded by a grant from BP/The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative through the Florida Institute of Oceanography. This two-year research project looked at the effects of Deepwater Horizon Macondo Well oil, the Corexit 9500A dispersant used in the spill and dispersed oil on larval oysters, conch and shrimp as well as their planktonic food sources.

Laramore S. 2011-2012. “An Initiative to Design and Demonstrate a Prototype Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture System for Sustainable Land-Based Aquaculture: Shrimp Biofloc Fed Component.” Funded by the HBOI Aquaculture Specialty License Plate. This year-long research project looked at determining whether fish waste from the land based IMTA system in aquaculture could be used to drive and maintain a shrimp biofloc system. Two different system designs were explored.

Laramore S.  2012-2013. “Supplement: An Initiative to Design and Demonstrate a Prototype Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture System for Sustainable Land-Based Aquaculture: Shrimp Biofloc Fed Component.” Funded by the HBOI Aquaculture Specialty License Plate. This supplemental research project characterized the planktonic and microbial community in the shrimp biofloc system from initiation to harvest.

Garr A, Laramore S, Ohs C and Myers B. 2012-2013. “Aquaculture in Action: Enhancing the Teach Aquaculture Curriculum for the Novice Teacher.” Funded by the Florida Aquaculture Research Council. The online Teach Aquaculture curriculum was evaluated and improved based on user feedback. This information was used to update the website, revise the curriculum and used in a weeklong “Aquaculture Immersion Excursion” workshop. 

Laramore SE, Scarpa J, and Wills P. 2012-2013.”Indian River State Aquaculture Degree Program.” Funded by Indian River State College. Provides hands-on instruction in aquaculture for degree and non-degree seeking students. Students may opt to take one or two classes or obtain a one year Aquaculture Certificate or a two year AAS degree. 

Last Modified 8/25/14