What the Clinic Does



Accent Reduction

For adults who learned a language other than English, as their first (primary) language. This is not considered a language “disorder”, but a language difference.

The CDC works with people to help them communicate more effectively with others in academic work and social situations.

THE PROCESS:

An evaluation of the client’s pronunciation of English sounds and use of word and sentence stress is administered. Other areas of language, such as grammar or use of figurative language may also be assessed.

Sound System Differences:

Sounds (phonemes) that are not conforming to Standard American English (SAE), and the sound context in which these differences occur.

Differences in syllable stress (emphasis) at the word level, and/or word stress at the sentence level.

These differences may affect the client’s ability to communicate effectively in a variety of situations, including phone conversation, class presentations, or job interviews.

Language Differences:

There are grammatical elements which differ from SAE. Some of these may be demonstrated in syntax, or different word order within a sentence. Other differences may be in verb tense, pronouns, and articles (a, an, the). In addition, there is often a difficulty in understanding figurative language/idioms in English.

A therapy program (goals) are established, as well as a schedule for therapy.



Adult Diagnostics and Therapy

ARTICULATION THERAPY

This type of therapy improves the production of spoken sounds (errors such as a lisp) and includes both vowels and consonants. Some people who have had a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other types of trauma, may experience difficulty with forming sounds. This difficulty with the sound system is known as “Apraxia of Speech” or “Dysarthria”.

ASSISTIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION (AAC)

Some adults may be unable to verbalize or have limited ability to verbalize to communicate. With these adults, we are able to use systems that help them to communicate. These systems may be electronic devices or they may be in the form of pictures and symbols on paper. Each individual would be evaluated to determine which system is best for them and their family. Both the adult and their family would be trained to use this system.

FLUENCY THERAPY

This is for adults who exhibit stuttering, cluttering, or any other disorder of fluency, whether it has been an on-going speech pattern, or has resulted from a neurological condition. In addition, we provide a Support Group for adults who stutter on the first Wednesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. in Room 428 in Building #47 (the College of Education).

LANGUAGE THERAPY

This type of therapy may be needed as the result of a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other type of trauma. Concerns may range from the ability to understand the spoken or written word to the ability to formulate spoken or written sentences that are logical and understandable. This difficulty with language is typically known as “Aphasia”.

VOICE THERAPY

In many cases, this involves teaching adults how to use their voices and vocal hygiene so they do not develop vocal nodules or other pathology. Many people abuse the vocal mechanism without knowing it, and then experience a different sounding voice or loss of voice; therefore, we also could work to improve vocal behavior and hygiene, after a doctor’s diagnosis. There may also be underlying neurological conditions that alter the sound of the voice, for which a doctor would recommend voice therapy.



Audiology Laboratory

AUDIOLOGISTS

Dr. Ali Danesh and Dr. Rebecca Anderson

EXTENSIVE SERVICES ARE OFFERED, AS FOLLOWS:

  1. Training of graduate students and enabling them to become efficient clinicians for patients with hearing disorders
  2. Serving patients with hearing disorders such as hearing loss, tinnitus
  3. Screening Audiometry
  4. Pure Tone Audiometry for ages 5 and up
  5. Speech Audiometry
  6. Diagnostic Audiology
  7. Otoacoustic Emissions
  8. Tympanometry and Acoustic Reflex
  9. Auditory Brainstem Response test
  10. Auditory Electrophysiology
  11. Screening for Auditory Processing Disorders (APD)
  12. APD consultation
  13. Aural Rehabilitation consultation
  14. Hearing Aid Evaluation and Recommendation
  15. Tinnitus evaluation and consultation
  16. Hearing Conservation consultation
  17. Decreased sound tolerance disorders evaluation and consultation
  18. Vestibular Consultation
  19. Computerized Dynamic Posturography (in collaboration with the Department of Exercise Science and Health Promotion).


Pediatric Diagnostics and Therapy

ARTICULATION THERAPY

This type of therapy improves the production of spoken sounds (errors, such as a lisp) and includes both vowels and consonants. Schools do not treat single sounds or “minor” articulation disorders, but the CDC (under the Department of Health) is able to help children with both severe and less severe articulation difficulties. We are also able to supplement the services that the school district provides.

ASSISTIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION (AAC)

Some children may be unable to verbalize or have limited ability to verbalize to communicate. With these children, we are able to use systems that help them to communicate. These systems may be electronic devices or they may be in the form of pictures and symbols on paper. Each individual would be evaluated to determine which system is best for them and their family. Both the child and family would be trained to use this system.

AUDITORY PROCESSING THERAPY

Implications of auditory processing deficits can be directly related to difficulties following directions, reading, and writing – skills that are critical for learning. This area, if positively identified by a speech-language pathologist, would require further evaluation by an audiologist, and subsequent therapy with a speech-language pathologist.

AUTISM SPECTRUM

We work with children and adults to help them with Pragmatic Language and Social Skills, as well as “language” in all of its aspects (including reading and writing).

FLUENCY THERAPY

Children who exhibit stuttering, cluttering, or other disorders of fluency can receive help at the Communication Disorders Clinic (CDC-FAU). This therapy involves helping children who stutter to become more fluent and more effective communicators.

LANGUAGE THERAPY

When working with younger children, we provide therapy for listening comprehension and spoken expression. For older children, we assist with reading comprehension and written expression.

VOICE THERAPY

In many cases, this involves teaching children how to use their voices so they do not develop vocal nodules or other pathology. Many children abuse the vocal mechanism without knowing it, and then experience a different sounding voice, or loss of voice. It is very important to work with caregivers and parents to make changes in the environment, lessen vocal abuse, and help to increase awareness of situations of vocal abuse.