F. Scott and Ernest: Friends and American Literature At Its Best
Taylor Hagood
Lifelong Learning Society Distinguished Professor in Arts and Humanities, 2013-2014

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Few writers have maintained such a strong hold on readers’ imaginations as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, two of the greatest and most important Modernist American writers. From Fitzgerald's lush descriptions of handsome men and beautiful women in the glitzy Roaring Twenties to Hemingway's terse language portraits of wounded matadors, fisherman, and writers, these authors epitomize the glamour as well as the pain to be found in the lives of early 20th-century Americans. Not only were these men great stylists who forged lasting works of fiction filled with unforgettable characters such as Jay Gatsby and Lady Brett Ashley, they also formed one of the most memorable literary relationships ever. Their friendship could by turns be one of great warmth and mutual support or one of intense rivalry and even anger. This personal connection made its way into these men’s writing in deep ways whether in the form of Fitzgerald’s tremendously insightful advice on Hemingway’s manuscripts, or in Hemingway’s depictions of Fitzgerald in his nonfiction book A Moveable Feast. Integral to United States literary history and to all who are interested in great writing and the intricacies of the human spirit, these two writers continually fascinate as their work surprises, delights, seduces, and terrifies. In a series of eight lectures, we will examine these two and their legacy, while revisiting their writing in all its power and beauty. No readings will be assigned, and no reading or previous knowledge of these authors is required to enjoy the lectures, which will present background, plots, and critical responses to the writings while also offering samples of their wonderful prose.
LECTURES:
1. Fitzgerald and Hemingway: Their Relationship
2. The Short Fiction
3. This Side of Paradise
4. The Great Gatsby
5. Tender is the Night
6. The Sun Also Rises
7. For Whom the Bell Tolls
8. A Moveable Feast
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION: Dr. Taylor Hagood is the 2013-2014 Lifelong Learning Society Distinguished Professor of Arts and Letters and Associate Professor of American Literature at Florida Atlantic University. Receiving his Ph.D. in United States literature and culture from the University of Mississippi, where he was the Frances Bell McCool Fellow in Faulkner Studies, Hagood has authored to books: Faulkner's Imperialism: Space, Place and the Materiality of Myth and Secrecy, Magic and  The One-Act Plays of Harlem Renaissance Women Writers. In 2009-2010, he was a Fulbright Professor in the Amerika Institut at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich, Germany, and he was awarded the 2010-2011 Scholar of the Year Award at the Assistant Professor level.

W182
Time: 11:30 am - 1:15 pm
Date: Mondays, January 6, 13, 27; February 3; 10, 17, 24; March 3
Location: Barry and Florence Friedberg Auditorium, Boca Raton Campus
Fees: $68 member / $98 non-member