FAU Lifelong Learning Society, Jupiter
Jeffrey S. Morton, Ph.D.
LLS Jupiter Distinguished Faculty Award 
Foreign Policy Association Fellow 

Political Science

Jeffrey S. Morton, Ph.D., is a Professor of Political Science and Fellow at the Foreign Policy Association. He received his Master’s degree from Rutgers University and his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina. Professor Morton has been honored as the FAU Researcher of the Year, has contributed to articles that have appeared in the Wall Street Journal and is Director of the FAU Diplomacy Program.


News and Notes from Professor Morton
The Decline of American Hegemony?
Confronting a New Multi-Polar World

When Russia, the UK and China checked President Obama's effort to militarily strike Syria in September 2013, we may have witnessed the transition to a world of many powers. Has the era of American global leadership ended? Can we or should we resist the rise of other great powers? What are the implications of a multi-polar world?

Lecture # S1M1
Register early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a One-Time Lecture or Event.
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Monday, March 24, 2014
  Time:2:15– 3:45 p.m.
  Fee:$20 /member; $30/non-member
U.S. Foreign Policy
The Role of International Law

The construction and execution of American foreign policy involves a wide range of considerations, including strategic calculations, financial costs, and domestic politics. An underappreciated, yet influential, factor in foreign policy is international law. This course examines the role that international law plays in American foreign policy both theoretically and practically. Case studies from America's past and current foreign policy challenges will be analyzed throughout the course.

Six Lectures
  1. The Role of International Law in U.S. Foreign Policy — From the killing of Osama bin Laden to the suggested intervention in Iran to halt nuclear weapons development, how important should international law be to the U.S.?
  2. The Legal Right to go to War Is the 1945 — American-drafted prohibition on war in line with U.S. interests and policy today? When can we legally go to war?
  3. Legal Restrictions During Armed Conflict — What weapons and tactics are legal on the battlefield? Landmines, blinding lasers and nuclear weapons, among others, will be evaluated.
  4. International Human Rights Law — To what extent does the United States support and/or violate global human rights laws? Should we strengthen existing laws or disregard them?
  5. The Laws of Diplomatic Immunity — In the aftermath of the killing of US Ambassador Christopher Stevens, how safe are American diplomats abroad and to what extent is diplomatic immunity abused by foreign countries?
  6. The World Courts — Should the United States support and participate directly in the International Court of Justice and International Criminal Court?
Course # S6W1/S6W1X (Annex) — Morning session
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Wednesdays — March 19, 26; April 2, 9, 23, 30; No Class April 16
  Time:9:00–10:30 a.m.
  Fee:$51/member; $76/non-member
 
Course # S6W2/S6W2X (Annex) — Afternoon session
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Wednesdays — March 19, 26; April 2, 9, 23, 30; No Class April 16
  Time:12:00–1:30 p.m.
  Fee:$51/member; $76/non-member
 
Pivoting from the Middle East

America’s almost singular emphasis on the Middle East is beginning to give way to a more globalist approach to world politics. Our inability to shape Iraqi politics after the end of that war, the 2014 pullout from Afghanistan, the Arab Spring and the ongoing war in Syria have underscored a declining U.S. position in the region. In this one-time lecture, Professor Morton will analyze each of the challenges we face in the Middle East and our redirection of U.S. foreign policy to other regions of concern and interest.

Lecture # SUM1
Register early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a One-Time Lecture or Event.
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Monday, May 12, 2014
  Time:10:00–11:30 a.m.
  Fee:$20 /member; $30/non-member
Weapons of Mass Destruction

Throughout the 20th century, the United States has sought to limit both the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Our approach to the nonproliferation and use of WMD has ranged from diplomacy to intervention. In 2013, the U.S. struck diplomatic deals with Syria (chemical weapons) and Iran (nuclear program). Has the pendulum shifted too far in the direction of diplomacy? Is intervention a better way to degrade the WMD programs of adversarial states? In this one-time lecture, Professor Morton will analyze the global state of affairs as it relates to WMD and explore options for dealing with nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.

Lecture # SUM2
Register early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a One-Time Lecture or Event.
  Place:Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
  Dates:Monday, May 19, 2014
  Time:10:00–11:30 a.m.
  Fee:$20 /member; $30/non-member