Anthony Stagliano

Anthony Stagliano

Anthony Stagliano is a scholar of rhetoric and a film and media artist, whose research concerns the intersections of material theories of rhetoric, media theory, and theories of technology. His films and media art pieces have been shown in festivals and galleries around the world. His feature narrative film, Fade, was released theatrically and on DVD. His scholarship has appeared in Computers and Composition as well as the edited collections Tracing Rhetoric and Material Life and Rhetorical Machines.

His current research project includes a monograph and related artistic interventions. The monograph, currently in preparation, and titled Biotechnologies of Disobedience, examines the novel forms of civil disobedience that emerge in response to new, digital tools of surveillance and control—for instance, ubiquitous security cameras, data mining in social media spaces, biometric scanning—activities that disobey, by hacking, subverting, or otherwise thwarting efforts to use the interface of our bodies and networked technologies. Biotechnologies of Disobedience theorizes the character of this new public technique and the possibilities, limitations, and risks in its new modes of disobedience and democratic participation. In rethinking disobedience itself in terms of the interface between lived bodies and the rhetorical technologies of what Deleuze called the “control society,” the book studies three sites for biotechnologies of disobedience: 1. Biometric Control: We are in public (either virtual or physical space) with bodies and faces that are subject to biometric forms of tracking, data processing, analysis, surveillance, and control; 2. Genomic Surveillance: We have or leave behind, in public, traces of DNA which are themselves subject to complex forms of tracking, data processing, analysis, surveillance, and control; 3. Hierarchies of Biotechnical Knowledge: Any disruption to the conditions of 1 and 2 is contingent on different distributions of biotechnical knowledge and tools than are currently dominant. Thus, the hierarchies that cultivate technical mastery of the interface between our public bodies and networked technologies, themselves serve as biotechnologies of control, and as sites of disobedient creativity.

More about his work can be found at: www.anthonymstagliano.com.

CV